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Elizabeth Restaurant--Opening in September

Elizabeth Restaurant--Opening in September
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  • Post #241 - February 19th, 2019, 7:18 am
    Post #241 - February 19th, 2019, 7:18 am Post #241 - February 19th, 2019, 7:18 am
    Chicago Chef of Michelin-Starred Elizabeth Is Coming to Michigan’s Upper Peninsula

    https://detroit.eater.com/2019/2/18/182 ... -elizabeth
    Hors D'oeuvre: A ham sandwich cut into forty pieces.
    - Jack Benny
  • Post #242 - April 1st, 2019, 11:07 am
    Post #242 - April 1st, 2019, 11:07 am Post #242 - April 1st, 2019, 11:07 am
    Julia Child inspo menu seriously impressed me after the Harry Potter-themed one, which was good-far-from-great.

    Wine pairing was much better than what I’ve had at Elizabeth previously. On the light & sweet side, lots of natural/natural-leaning wines. Loved it.

    Hard to do a ‘highlights’ that doesn’t end up being most of the meal, because this was as consistent as I’ve experienced at Elizabeth, and what that means is almost nothing stood out. I was basically happy end-to-end. Anyway, this is some of what I got:

    Bouillabaisse, served cold, with a large, nice piece of fish (amberjack, I think) rolled up. Delicious. Served in the same dragon egg dish from HP menu.

    Profiteroles filled (stuffed to overflowing almost!) with a warm chicken liver mousse and topped with some mushroom, idk, char, were surprisingly delicious. The mushroom on top was so good I was eating the crumbs off my plate. Came with a cute little truffle bite.

    There was a green potato leek soup and I would have happily just had a big bowl of that and a loaf of bread for $25 and called it a meal. It was so good! Only complaint was that it was tasting menu-sized. I wanted so much more! Think the green color came from green onion tops? Had some wine, lots of cream.

    I tend to like Eliz’s bread course and this was no different. Tasting menus without bread courses bum me out. Happily, it seems like Chef likes her bread and it won’t be going anywhere!

    Two proteins: lobster thermidor and duck l’orange. Lobster was a little salty but really kind of just wonderful. Duck was served two ways (breast and confit-on-bone). Confit was forgettable (and I love duck confit!) but breast was done wonderfully. I’m not sure why, but the duck course was kind of huge, and I would have preferred less duck and a third protein, but I think its size will help to make sure no one leaves hungry.

    Only two desserts, a little puff filled with apples (titled a tarte tatin, but upside down) and topped with vanilla cream and a single, small cookie. Very sadly light on dessert. Both were good, but it’s a tarte and a thumbprint cookie and this is a great restaurant, they weren’t going to mess these things up and I needed a little more dessert to end the night.

    Menus, generally, are a gripe I have with Elizabeth—please print me a menu! I know maybe a lot of people don’t care for them, but I love a reminder of a great dinner. The bathrooms at Smyth have some great menus framed and I aspire to, someday, do something with some of my menus. Sadly, Elizabeth will never appear on my bathroom wall it seems.
    Last edited by Guyb on April 18th, 2019, 1:53 pm, edited 1 time in total.
  • Post #243 - April 1st, 2019, 7:44 pm
    Post #243 - April 1st, 2019, 7:44 pm Post #243 - April 1st, 2019, 7:44 pm
    They used to do very nice printed menus, now they email them to you after the meal.
    I too love their bread course, but at least once I've felt like I'd have gone home hungry if not for the bread.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #244 - June 9th, 2019, 8:03 pm
    Post #244 - June 9th, 2019, 8:03 pm Post #244 - June 9th, 2019, 8:03 pm
    Went today for the Game of Thrones Brunch, just wonderful. Each course was named for a location in the stories (but I've forgotten dinner)

    First course was Fleabottom: an oat porridge with some of the best yogurt I've ever had, and candied strawberries (I think).

    Second course was Castle Black, and more lunch: kale and asparagus salad with truffle vinaigrette and picked rutabaga and pearl onion; black bread with cultured butter (her bread is always awesome), and French onion soup (really good, enough bread in the soup that it's really thick).

    Third course was Winterfell: nettle and ramp pasta with pea shoots, Jonah crab, sunny side up egg and house smoked jowl bacon. Almost carbonara, great food.

    Last course I can't remember the location: spice babka (made with their croissant dough but maybe a little light on filling), and a lingonberry compote.

    Always delightful, not much surprising but perfect in execution and service.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #245 - July 18th, 2019, 3:19 pm
    Post #245 - July 18th, 2019, 3:19 pm Post #245 - July 18th, 2019, 3:19 pm
    Ex-Next chef Jenner Tomaska’s residency starts today in Lincoln Square

    https://chicago.eater.com/2019/7/17/206 ... oln-square
    Hors D'oeuvre: A ham sandwich cut into forty pieces.
    - Jack Benny
  • Post #246 - October 28th, 2019, 2:56 pm
    Post #246 - October 28th, 2019, 2:56 pm Post #246 - October 28th, 2019, 2:56 pm
    At the New Yorker's website, Helen Rosner praises Iliana Regan’s memoir “Burn the Place,” the first food book to be long-listed for the National Book Award since “Julia Child and More Company,” in 1980 . . .

    at newyorker.com, Helen Rosner wrote:In 2008, after nearly a decade or so fighting her way up through Chicago’s restaurant trenches, the chef Iliana Regan quit her job at Alinea—the Sistine Chapel of American culinary modernism—to open a farmers’-market stall selling homemade tortillas and from-scratch ranch dressing. One Sister, as she called the endeavor, was a hodgepodge of ambitious apartment homesteading: buttermilk fermenting on a shelf, mushrooms (the good kind) unfurling in the humidity of her bathroom. In “Burn the Place,” her brutal and luminous memoir, Regan writes, “Mom wasn’t excited about the milk curdling in the pantry or the mushrooms growing in the shower, but she was glad I wasn’t stumbling in drunk out of my goddamned mind every night. I was still drinking, of course. But this other passion, to pursue my ideas, was beginning to change me.”

    “Burn the Place” Is a Thrilling, Disquieting Memoir of Addiction and Coming of Age

    =R=
    Gardening is a bloodsport --Meghan Kleeman

    Why don't you take these profiteroles and put them up your shi'-ta-holes? --Jemaine & Bret

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #247 - October 29th, 2019, 12:06 pm
    Post #247 - October 29th, 2019, 12:06 pm Post #247 - October 29th, 2019, 12:06 pm
    Thanks for sharing this review Ronnie:
    “Burn the Place” Is a Thrilling, Disquieting Memoir of Addiction and Coming of Age

    My library will have this book Nov. 18 and I''m fourth in line...

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