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chicken boti at khan's [Khan BBQ reopened at new location]

chicken boti at khan's [Khan BBQ reopened at new location]
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  • Post #181 - May 28th, 2008, 10:50 pm
    Post #181 - May 28th, 2008, 10:50 pm Post #181 - May 28th, 2008, 10:50 pm
    I'm munching on a piece right now (using MHays as an inspiration, I got to take home the leftovers). When we had it hot, I thought the flavor was coriander-like. Now, having it cold, I can definitely detect notes of thyme.
    Ajowan seeds contain an essential oil which is about 50% thymol which is a strong germicide, anti-spasmodic and fungicide.

    I've also noticed I haven't had any spasms since lunch, so it must work (although I don't think I've ever had a spasm in my life before...)

    Unfortunately, it's not an anti-spazmodic.
  • Post #182 - May 28th, 2008, 11:00 pm
    Post #182 - May 28th, 2008, 11:00 pm Post #182 - May 28th, 2008, 11:00 pm
    The classic use of ajwain in North Indian veg cookery is in ajwain roti though I've never seen this served in restaurants here in the US - it adds a herbal peppery note to the roti. You might ask the chef at Khan's if they can offer that rather than the ajwain chicken if you prefer the regular broasted (though the ajwain version is a pretty common North Indian dish & its nice to see it offered; I'll have to make a trip to sample this).

    Ajwain also crops up in the pastry surrounding samosas (IIRC the samosas at Baba's feature this), part of the spice mix for missy roti (I've never seen this in US restaurants but Kontos makes a semi-acceptable version of this roti & its available at some Devon grocers) & its a common addition to potato dishes, particularly potato paranthas & dry potato curries.
  • Post #183 - May 29th, 2008, 4:22 am
    Post #183 - May 29th, 2008, 4:22 am Post #183 - May 29th, 2008, 4:22 am
    When we were served the "special" chicken, the only way I could come up with to describe the taste that Ajwain added was "green". It had a definite vegital taste to it, and I suppose notes of corriander/thyme would be a good way to describe it, but not exactly. Like GWiv, I much prefer the original flavor to the Ajwain version. It's clearly a case of "if it ain't broken, don't fix it."
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #184 - May 29th, 2008, 5:16 am
    Post #184 - May 29th, 2008, 5:16 am Post #184 - May 29th, 2008, 5:16 am
    As Athena notes ajwain is used in N. Indian savory dishes with pastry/crusts. I like it in pakodas* - (vegetable fritters in a chickpea flour (besan) batter). Ajwain also goes well with shrimp/prawns. I've seen cookbooks that confuse ajwain for, or suggest as its substitute, thyme. It is however very different - ajwain has a minty coolness and a little goes a long way. The thymol content in ajwain is much higher than in thyme - besides thyme contains other essential oils that round out its flavor.

    Clockwise from foreground: ajwain, cumin, celery seed, cardamom, fennel seed click for larger view
    Image

    It would be very interesting in the chicken crust - but I can see it dominating the flavor. If you are not expecting it it may be a bit of a put off, so I do think it would be much better the second time around...

    see also the spice pages entry on ajwain

    *pakodas
    Image Image
  • Post #185 - May 29th, 2008, 6:19 am
    Post #185 - May 29th, 2008, 6:19 am Post #185 - May 29th, 2008, 6:19 am
    While ajwain is used in a number of North Indian preparations, as pointed out by Sazerac, it is not an ingredient that is used much in Pakistani dishes. This addition to the chicken is interesting. They must have used a fair amount to have so radically impacted the final color of the dish. Aesthetically, I prefer the original version.

    In India ajwain is used as a digestive. I've heard reports that a teaspoon or so taken with water relieves even severe heartburn - no chewing required.

    Jyoti
    Jyoti
    A meal, with bread and wine, shared with friends and family is among the most essential and important of all human rituals.
    Ruhlman
  • Post #186 - May 29th, 2008, 9:55 am
    Post #186 - May 29th, 2008, 9:55 am Post #186 - May 29th, 2008, 9:55 am
    stevez wrote:It's clearly a case of "if it ain't broken, don't fix it."

    I didn't see it quite the same way. I do like the standard issue broast chicken better but this seemed to be an instance where the chef was enthusiastically trying to do something special for us and on that level, I really appreciated it.

    =R=
    Gardening is a bloodsport --Meghan Kleeman

    Why don't you take these profiteroles and put them up your shi'-ta-holes? --Jemaine & Bret

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #187 - May 29th, 2008, 10:31 am
    Post #187 - May 29th, 2008, 10:31 am Post #187 - May 29th, 2008, 10:31 am
    I agree with Ron. He was obviously very excited to have us try his new variation on the broasted chicken.
  • Post #188 - May 29th, 2008, 3:16 pm
    Post #188 - May 29th, 2008, 3:16 pm Post #188 - May 29th, 2008, 3:16 pm
    ronnie_suburban wrote:
    stevez wrote:It's clearly a case of "if it ain't broken, don't fix it."

    I didn't see it quite the same way. I do like the standard issue broast chicken better but this seemed to be an instance where the chef was enthusiastically trying to do something special for us and on that level, I really appreciated it.

    =R=



    In the sense that it was a special dish prepared for us, I really appreciate the effort. I don't want to come off as ungrateful. I still like the original recipe much better, though. Hopefully, next time the chef wants to grace us with a lagnaippe, he'll bring our some goat chanps. :wink:
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #189 - July 17th, 2008, 8:12 am
    Post #189 - July 17th, 2008, 8:12 am Post #189 - July 17th, 2008, 8:12 am
    I had a chance to visit Chicago last week and decided to check out Devon Ave. It was a glorious day for such an adventure. The goal was to walk up and down Devon, eating as much as I could hold, and then buying more to take home. Foodie or glutton...your choice. I used many of the recommendations that have been put on this board. Tried samosas, mango drink, nann, Indian sweets. When one shop owner heard about my quest, he insisted that I go to Chopal for the Chili Chicken (I loved it). I also thought the naan at Chopal was outstanding. I got some fun groceries at the Patel Bros. grocery. Tried out a couple of the packaged snacks. The one I really liked was Moong Dal. It was billed as a "gram" snack. What does that mean? The final stop was at Khan's BBQ. Mr. Khan wasn't in attendance. I got the chicken boti and garlic naan. When my sister tried to order just some naan, the man taking the order pulled out a photo of that "chow hound" guy, and informed my sister that she had better get some real food or she would be missing out. Note: I did not see the LTH certificate. So while my sister and I waited for our carryout we took the time to soak in all in. One patron (which I believe was mentally challenged, but who knows) was waiting for his food, and suddenly starting pounding the table yelling for his food. Just before he got his food, he started crying. That really seemed to motivate the kitchen staff. In the kitchen I was fascinated by watching them run the meats up the metal rods and hanging them over the fire. I was amazed at how little time they required to cook. Next I went and checked out the bathrooms. Very nice. I'd like to ask what the little red plastic pitchers next to each toilet are for, but I'm afraid of the answer. Back to waiting for the food, I enjoyed with awe and wonder the crystal chandelier and glass chandelier. Finally....the food. This was my one disappointment of the day, and it was entirely my fault. The chicken was tender, moist and beautifully charred. However, I should have asked them to scale down the spice (fire) for me. After a few bites, I couldn't eat it. For those of you who can "take it" I tip my hat to you. There was a day when I couldn't get enough of anything. However, my body now lets me know when and how much is enough. So too with the garlic naan. The naan was loaded (and I mean loaded) with garlic. Again my body could not take it. So maybe someday I'll be back, and have a chance to order more appropriately for me. Thanks to all you good people who have given so many wonderful suggestions for a trip down Devon Ave.
  • Post #190 - July 17th, 2008, 8:37 am
    Post #190 - July 17th, 2008, 8:37 am Post #190 - July 17th, 2008, 8:37 am
    razbry wrote:Finally....the food. This was my one disappointment of the day, and it was entirely my fault. The chicken was tender, moist and beautifully charred. However, I should have asked them to scale down the spice (fire) for me.

    It sounds like it was a great day and I admire your fortitude. I just love that our town is filled with food-rich neighborhoods, like Devon Avenue.

    I ate dinner at Khan last night and thought it was wonderful but I did notice right away that it was a bit more fiery than I remember it typically being. For me, that was actually good thing but it was definitely noticeable. I also noticed what appeared to be several first-timers in the restaurant, which is probably attritbutable to this recent piece in the Reader, in which LTH contributor Mike Sula chose Khan BBQ as the Best Restaurant in Chicago for 2008.

    Thanks, razbry, for sharing your adventure with us.

    =R=
    Gardening is a bloodsport --Meghan Kleeman

    Why don't you take these profiteroles and put them up your shi'-ta-holes? --Jemaine & Bret

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #191 - July 17th, 2008, 10:31 am
    Post #191 - July 17th, 2008, 10:31 am Post #191 - July 17th, 2008, 10:31 am
    Gram is simply the general term for any number of legumes (such as, in this case, mung beans).
  • Post #192 - July 17th, 2008, 3:02 pm
    Post #192 - July 17th, 2008, 3:02 pm Post #192 - July 17th, 2008, 3:02 pm
    I also noticed what appeared to be several first-timers in the restaurant, which is probably attritbutable to this recent piece in the Reader, in which LTH contributor Mike Sula chose Khan BBQ as the Best Restaurant in Chicago for 2008.


    Stay tuned for some really obvious first-timers from a maximally improbable publication.
    Watch Sky Full of Bacon, the Chicago food HD podcast!
    New episode: Soil, Corn, Cows and Cheese
    Watch the Reader's James Beard Award-winning Key Ingredient here.
  • Post #193 - July 19th, 2008, 11:39 pm
    Post #193 - July 19th, 2008, 11:39 pm Post #193 - July 19th, 2008, 11:39 pm
    Stopped by tonight around 7ish and got seated immediately. If there's a "Reader Effect," either it was short-lived or it's attuned to the "Pitchfork effect."

    Skipped my usual chanp for the seekh kabob--good, but nowhere near the goat chops. I had the same reaction to the aloo when I passed up my lentils for it. However, the Boti was the best I've had at the restaurant--perfectly cooked, balanced spice profile. The Boti has always been memorable, but tonight it felt perfect.
  • Post #194 - July 20th, 2008, 8:34 am
    Post #194 - July 20th, 2008, 8:34 am Post #194 - July 20th, 2008, 8:34 am
    Mike G wrote:Stay tuned for some really obvious first-timers from a maximally improbable publication.

    Covergirls and laddies? :wink: I have to admit, I'm amusedly curious which demographic that blurb will bring...
  • Post #195 - July 21st, 2008, 1:09 pm
    Post #195 - July 21st, 2008, 1:09 pm Post #195 - July 21st, 2008, 1:09 pm
    razbry wrote: I'd like to ask what the little red plastic pitchers next to each toilet are for, but I'm afraid of the answer. .


    :mrgreen: I laughed so hard i had to close my office door! I'll share the secret. . .

    The red pitcher you saw is called a "lowta". It is used by Muslims, pursuant to religious requirements, to cleanse their privates with water after using the bathroom. . err. .#1 or #2.

    If you've ever been to a Muslim friend's house, you'll usually see a watering pot in the bathroom. . .more paranoid types like my brother hide them under the sink. .lol. If you ever want to see your Muslim friend squirm, pull the jug out from under his sink at a party, or if he's flirting with someone, and say. "HEY - WHAT'S THIS JUG DOING IN YOUR BATHROOM?!" :oops: The look on his face will have more lasting power than a Frank Gehry creation.:mrgreen:

    The practice may seem peculiar to some, but its actually quite logical. . and refreshing. lol :P .

    And it makes it all the more easier for a man like me to wear white boxerbriefs with absolute impunity.

    Now I have to ask. . . are you glad you asked the question? :wink:
  • Post #196 - July 21st, 2008, 5:31 pm
    Post #196 - July 21st, 2008, 5:31 pm Post #196 - July 21st, 2008, 5:31 pm
    Ghazi wrote:The red pitcher you saw is called a "lowta". It is used by Muslims, pursuant to religious requirements, to cleanse their...


    Wow. The stuff I learn from this forum always surprises and humbles me... I had no idea... Never even heard of the practice...
  • Post #197 - July 21st, 2008, 6:52 pm
    Post #197 - July 21st, 2008, 6:52 pm Post #197 - July 21st, 2008, 6:52 pm
    Interestingly, certain traditional Hindu communities have the same practice as well.
  • Post #198 - July 21st, 2008, 7:38 pm
    Post #198 - July 21st, 2008, 7:38 pm Post #198 - July 21st, 2008, 7:38 pm
    And to think that the French need to install an entire second appliance to get the job done.
  • Post #199 - July 22nd, 2008, 7:13 am
    Post #199 - July 22nd, 2008, 7:13 am Post #199 - July 22nd, 2008, 7:13 am
    jimwdavis wrote:And to think that the French need to install an entire second appliance to get the job done.


    Is that what that's for! Oh, my . . .
    "The fork with two prongs is in use in northern Europe. In England, they’re armed with a steel trident, a fork with three prongs. In France we have a fork with four prongs; it’s the height of civilization." Eugene Briffault (1846)
  • Post #200 - July 23rd, 2008, 3:38 pm
    Post #200 - July 23rd, 2008, 3:38 pm Post #200 - July 23rd, 2008, 3:38 pm
    Thank you Ghazi...I am glad I asked the question! The world is rich with all sorts of things to learn and laugh about!
  • Post #201 - July 23rd, 2008, 4:03 pm
    Post #201 - July 23rd, 2008, 4:03 pm Post #201 - July 23rd, 2008, 4:03 pm
    Ghazi,

    I had assumed they were washing their feet, which sometimes the uninformed think is the end-use of the 2nd appliance in a French bathroom. :wink:

    Do you take extra towels into the stall for drying? Maybe this would explain why we see signs advising not to flush anything down the toilet in ethnic toilets. While toilet paper is acceptable, the extra drying towels are not made to dissolve nicely and do clog up the plumbing.

    I was talking to a friend who advised in Filipino households there will be a cup next to the toilet. It is used for the same reason as a red jug, just don't use it to gargle.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #202 - July 23rd, 2008, 4:19 pm
    Post #202 - July 23rd, 2008, 4:19 pm Post #202 - July 23rd, 2008, 4:19 pm
    How delightfully appetizing this discussion has become.
  • Post #203 - November 2nd, 2008, 5:59 pm
    Post #203 - November 2nd, 2008, 5:59 pm Post #203 - November 2nd, 2008, 5:59 pm
    (cleaning out the storage card on my camera, I stumbled across this)
    Image
    (now where are the pictures of my kids?)

    -ramon
  • Post #204 - November 2nd, 2008, 7:24 pm
    Post #204 - November 2nd, 2008, 7:24 pm Post #204 - November 2nd, 2008, 7:24 pm
    That, my friend, is classic! I hope this thread never dies. :mrgreen:
  • Post #205 - December 27th, 2008, 7:57 am
    Post #205 - December 27th, 2008, 7:57 am Post #205 - December 27th, 2008, 7:57 am
    Ghazi wrote:That, my friend, is classic! I hope this thread never dies. :mrgreen:

    I was thinking of starting a new thread with this post for that very reason. ;)

    Friday at post holiday 2pm Devon Ave was a madhouse, normally heavy traffic and difficult parking moving into the impossible zone, but we had house guests from Michigan to whom I had sung the praises of Chicken Boti and Daal Palak, plus we were meeting with friends for post holiday tale telling, so an audible to less congested environs was not an option.

    Niece and nephew were familiar with IndoPak, the kids not at all, though 16-year-old Kelsey showed superior LTH chops as she dug into Daal, Chicken Boti and Goat Qhorma with gusto. Her spice adverse brother a little more hesitant sticking with requested mild Broast Chicken and Khans meaty moist Tandori Chicken.

    Post Holiday Repast

    Image

    Kelsey, Sultan Ahmed, Dave

    Image

    Khan was Win, Win, Win a chance to trade holiday war stories with friends, introduce niece/nephew X2 to something new and delicious as always Boti, Broast and Daal.

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #206 - February 2nd, 2009, 3:39 am
    Post #206 - February 2nd, 2009, 3:39 am Post #206 - February 2nd, 2009, 3:39 am
    Thinkin' of taking out some saucy goodness (and maybe one of those chicken dishes or two ;)) from Khan, and I was wondering how to ask for the slightly spicy green yogurt-y sauce that goes with the standard opening salad, whether there or at Usmania, Sabri Nehari, etc. Maybe bundle that with daal palak and some naan to rock my biryani leftovers at home, but I don't want to fumble a phone order over the salad dressing. Any help with the name(s) here?

    --Dan

    P.S. Only read about the pulled-pork event earlier this month just now, but congrats to Gary and the team on what read (and definitely looked) like a great BBQ outing.
  • Post #207 - February 2nd, 2009, 5:05 am
    Post #207 - February 2nd, 2009, 5:05 am Post #207 - February 2nd, 2009, 5:05 am
    Ask for "raita" or green chutney.
    "By the fig, the olive..." Surat Al-Teen, Mecca 95:1"
  • Post #208 - February 2nd, 2009, 11:15 am
    Post #208 - February 2nd, 2009, 11:15 am Post #208 - February 2nd, 2009, 11:15 am
    Habibi wrote:Ask for "raita" or green chutney.

    In my experience, Khan's always includes the raita in a take-out order, along with the lettuce, onions, and cukes balled up in some foil.
  • Post #209 - February 2nd, 2009, 11:25 am
    Post #209 - February 2nd, 2009, 11:25 am Post #209 - February 2nd, 2009, 11:25 am
    ask for extra raita. khan's raita is among the best... does anyone have parking tips around that area?
  • Post #210 - February 2nd, 2009, 12:25 pm
    Post #210 - February 2nd, 2009, 12:25 pm Post #210 - February 2nd, 2009, 12:25 pm
    MBK wrote:ask for extra raita. khan's raita is among the best... does anyone have parking tips around that area?

    MBK-

    Look back to page 5 of this thread for parking tips. There are a series of posts from December 19, 2007 that discuss this issue.
    -Mary

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