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George Trois-behind Restaurant Michael

George Trois-behind Restaurant Michael
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  • George Trois-behind Restaurant Michael

    Post #1 - November 3rd, 2015, 2:18 pm
    Post #1 - November 3rd, 2015, 2:18 pm Post #1 - November 3rd, 2015, 2:18 pm
    Just read an interesting blurb about Michael Lachowicz's 20 seat "hideaway" in the back of his Winnetka restaurant. Focusing on country french-very traditional- foie, rabbit,game, fromage served on Villeroy& Boch -you get the picture. To enjoy said delights you must choose and prepay $140 (seven courses) or $160 (ten courses). 50 year old wine is sold by the glass. Anyone been there yet? FYI just next door is the new Masarati dealership. :lol:

    64 Green Bay Road
    Winnetka, IL 60093
    847-441-3100
    What disease did cured ham actually have?
  • Post #2 - November 3rd, 2015, 2:50 pm
    Post #2 - November 3rd, 2015, 2:50 pm Post #2 - November 3rd, 2015, 2:50 pm
    From George's website:

    Jackets are required for gentlemen to dine at George Trois.

    Additionally, no denim, hats (for gentlemen) or sleeveless shirts (for gentlemen) will be permitted. Ties for gentlemen are optional.

    ALL COATS ARE REQUIRED TO BE CHECKED WHEN DINING AT GT. (THESE ARE FULLY INSURED)

    First Ima stop off at the Suitery on Dearborn and get a $69 suit (with lapels by Lockheed), then go by George's. Wonder if I should try some of that half-century wine or stick with the new stuff.
  • Post #3 - November 3rd, 2015, 3:18 pm
    Post #3 - November 3rd, 2015, 3:18 pm Post #3 - November 3rd, 2015, 3:18 pm
    Additionally, no denim, hats (for gentlemen) or sleeveless shirts (for gentlemen) will be permitted. Ties for gentlemen are optional.

    Not being a gentleman, I guess I'm out. :cry:

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #4 - November 3rd, 2015, 10:17 pm
    Post #4 - November 3rd, 2015, 10:17 pm Post #4 - November 3rd, 2015, 10:17 pm
    Choey wrote:From George's website:

    Jackets are required for gentlemen to dine at George Trois.

    Additionally, no denim, hats (for gentlemen) or sleeveless shirts (for gentlemen) will be permitted. Ties for gentlemen are optional.

    ALL COATS ARE REQUIRED TO BE CHECKED WHEN DINING AT GT. (THESE ARE FULLY INSURED)

    First Ima stop off at the Suitery on Dearborn and get a $69 suit (with lapels by Lockheed), then go by George's. Wonder if I should try some of that half-century wine or stick with the new stuff.


    I presume what is meant is that men not wear their hats inside - not that they would be turned away if they were wearing hats in transit. I'm fine with this, if that's the case, as IMO only boors wears hats inside. As an Auburn fan, and therefore an anti-University of Alabama fan as can be, I always had tremendous respect for UA coach Bear Bryant (who made the houndstooth hat famous) as he never wore his hat indoors as he considered domed stadiums to be. And not serving men with tank tops? Here here! Thank you. Of course if jackets are required I do wonder how they will know that men aren't wearing sleeveless shirts underneath. :?:
    Objects in mirror appear to be losing.
  • Post #5 - November 4th, 2015, 5:46 am
    Post #5 - November 4th, 2015, 5:46 am Post #5 - November 4th, 2015, 5:46 am
    Elfin wrote:Just read an interesting blurb about Michael Lachowicz's 20 seat "hideaway" in the back of his Winnetka restaurant.


    Can you link the blurb or a sample menu? I'm totally fine with jackets and rules and stuff, but if that foie gras isn't sliced right off the lobe, I'm out.
    "We eat slowly and with gusto." - Paul Bäumer in AQOTWF
  • Post #6 - November 4th, 2015, 11:03 am
    Post #6 - November 4th, 2015, 11:03 am Post #6 - November 4th, 2015, 11:03 am
    It was in North Shore mag "The Holiday Issue", page 111. I don't know how to scan, patch, paste, download or whatever is needed to link. I am sorry-always a New Years resolution to learn how to do this and the second to break (diet being number 1). Maybe you can find it through 'modernluxury.com'-the publisher. Otherwise you can pick up freebie copies near NS train stations and some stores. In regard to menu, the article did feature a photo of "Trois Foie" described as "decedent foie gras flight...influenced by three regions of France: Alsace, Burgandy and Perigord". It is "served in a pastry shell with potato, candied onion and bacon salad; chilled over cognac-infused cherries and Marcona almonds; and as a seared medallion over a sandwhich of brioche, truffle and preserved fruit." From the photo each piece looks bite-sized, tasty and very pretty. The only hint of what else is served is"Seafood. Perhaps a trio of game: a breast of squab, a center-cut of venison loin chop and a saddle of rabbit stuffed with bread pudding. Then cheese. And a sweet finish or two" Anything 'Molecular' or burger-centric is out. The "'wine system' ...lets him serve 50 year old bottles of vino by the glass". Lachowicz is quoted" I want to reward all the North Shore diners who have been good to me. They deserve something extraordinary."
    What disease did cured ham actually have?
  • Post #7 - November 5th, 2015, 11:46 am
    Post #7 - November 5th, 2015, 11:46 am Post #7 - November 5th, 2015, 11:46 am
    ronnie_suburban wrote:
    Additionally, no denim, hats (for gentlemen) or sleeveless shirts (for gentlemen) will be permitted. Ties for gentlemen are optional.

    Not being a gentleman, I guess I'm out. :cry:

    =R=


    On the contrary, Ron. Since you're not a gentleman, I would submit that you are entitled to wear denim and a hat and, moreover, entitled to wear a sleeveless shirt, should you so desire. It's not clear, however, what the tie policy is for non-gentlemen. :D
    Gypsy Boy

    "I am not a glutton--I am an explorer of food." (Erma Bombeck)
  • Post #8 - November 5th, 2015, 1:43 pm
    Post #8 - November 5th, 2015, 1:43 pm Post #8 - November 5th, 2015, 1:43 pm
    Look, if the gentleman wants to wear a sleeveless jacket that's fine. But the gentleman's shirt must have sleeves. What's so hard about that? And as long as they have a copy of the overcoat insurance policy rider available for inspection, I'm good with the coat-check policy, too.
  • Post #9 - November 5th, 2015, 1:48 pm
    Post #9 - November 5th, 2015, 1:48 pm Post #9 - November 5th, 2015, 1:48 pm
    And I find the tie option refreshing. I sometimes worry that a tie will seem out of place, or worse, that I will be the object of discrimination based on my neckwear choice. It's reassuring to know that I have the option to wear a tie if I'd like.
  • Post #10 - November 5th, 2015, 1:58 pm
    Post #10 - November 5th, 2015, 1:58 pm Post #10 - November 5th, 2015, 1:58 pm
    JeffB wrote:...I will be the object of discrimination based on my neckwear choice.

    Don't know if it amounts to discrimination, but I definitely get plenty of visual insubordination whenever I wear the agate bolo tie I bought on Etsy.
  • Post #11 - November 5th, 2015, 3:28 pm
    Post #11 - November 5th, 2015, 3:28 pm Post #11 - November 5th, 2015, 3:28 pm
    JeffB wrote:Look, if the gentleman wants to wear a sleeveless jacket that's fine.


    But wouldn't that be considered a vest and thus fall under the restaurant's vest policy?
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #12 - November 5th, 2015, 3:51 pm
    Post #12 - November 5th, 2015, 3:51 pm Post #12 - November 5th, 2015, 3:51 pm
    stevez wrote:
    JeffB wrote:Look, if the gentleman wants to wear a sleeveless jacket that's fine.


    But wouldn't that be considered a vest and thus fall under the restaurant's vest policy?


    And the vests would likely be excluded from the insurance rider - so check at your own risk!
    Twitter: @Goof_2
  • Post #13 - November 5th, 2015, 5:00 pm
    Post #13 - November 5th, 2015, 5:00 pm Post #13 - November 5th, 2015, 5:00 pm
    Gonzo70 wrote:
    stevez wrote:
    JeffB wrote:Look, if the gentleman wants to wear a sleeveless jacket that's fine.


    But wouldn't that be considered a vest and thus fall under the restaurant's vest policy?


    And the vests would likely be excluded from the insurance rider - so check at your own risk!


    Actually I believe their coat insurance functions like an annuity that only pays out if the diner is fully vested.

    (Sorry moderators, I realize we should be having this discussion in the "LOLZ" forum.)
  • Post #14 - November 6th, 2015, 8:01 am
    Post #14 - November 6th, 2015, 8:01 am Post #14 - November 6th, 2015, 8:01 am
    Actually, let me repeat the OP's query: has anyone been? Though there are enough things about Restaurant Michael that dissuade us from being regulars, we do usually manage at least a visit every year because I think his cooking is worth putting up with the things I dislike. So I'd be very interested in trying out this experiment (for lack of a better word), the more so since it promises to be traditional French cooking. The price strikes me as reasonable and the pics certainly show an attractive room.... (And, quite frankly, given the way a lot of people (IMHO) tend to dress in "nice" restaurants, I don't really have a problem with his effort--even if a little ham-handed--to impose a dress code.
    Gypsy Boy

    "I am not a glutton--I am an explorer of food." (Erma Bombeck)
  • Post #15 - December 31st, 2018, 8:20 am
    Post #15 - December 31st, 2018, 8:20 am Post #15 - December 31st, 2018, 8:20 am
    My wife and I had a fantastic anniversary meal at Georges Trois last night. If you have great memories of meals at Le Francais or Le Perroquet, you can go here and re-experience traditional French cooking at the highest level.

    The setup: The "restaurant" is a small room inside Michael's. It has 6 or 7 tables. The door to the main restaurant is kept closed, so you are in a very quiet secluded area.

    The ambiance: This is old school. It's quiet but not stuffy. Men are required to wear jackets. Chef Lachowicz comes out and greats every table, and then personally serves every course except for one of the desserts. What I particularly like is that they do not turn tables. They have a few seatings, but that is just to spread out when people come. Our 12 course meal started at 6:00 and finished at 9:30. Lot's of time between courses to relax and talk. It is a full evening's entertainment.

    The food: no molecular gastronomy (which I love), and no unusual flavor combinations where you go "who would of thought of that!" But excellent ingredients, attention to detail, and top of the line old school French cooking. Last night's menu featured Perigord truffles in most of the course. We liked the portion sizes because at the end we were full, but not overstuffed. Lot's of small portions of very intensely flavored food. I had to get a second piece of bread to that I could sop up every drop of every sauce. Mostly meat, seafood and starch; very little vegetable.

    So sum up: a quiet room, a leisurely pace, and food that was just damn delicious. For a special occasion, I'd go back in a heartbeat.
  • Post #16 - April 18th, 2019, 1:14 pm
    Post #16 - April 18th, 2019, 1:14 pm Post #16 - April 18th, 2019, 1:14 pm
    George Trois reopens, along with new Aboyer and Silencieux; reservations now available
    http://www.chicagotribune.com/dining/ct ... story.html
    Never order barbecue in a place that also serves quiche - Lewis Grizzard
  • Post #17 - April 23rd, 2019, 2:38 pm
    Post #17 - April 23rd, 2019, 2:38 pm Post #17 - April 23rd, 2019, 2:38 pm
    Email received this morning:

    Okay everyone, we made it! This is going to be a short but very important communication. The Restaurants are gorgeous, and the designer and contractors delivered far beyond my expectations, you will not recognize where you are once you walk through these doors,
    ABSOLUTLY STUNNING WORK!
    Reservations for Aboyer, Silencieux & George Trois are now available! Aboyer's first night of dinner service is Wednesday May 1. Silencieux's first night is the very next day, Thursday May 2 and George Trois joins the party that Saturday, May 4! I would like to personally welcome you all back, I promise, you have been missed! I cannot wait to introduce you to the new restaurants I've built for you and as a bonus, a 12-seat bar for you to enjoy providing the finest craft cocktail and wine programs in the suburbs of Chicago. These programs in fact, are as strong and well thought out as anything you will find in the city. I have built an urban outpost. Now you'll be able to enjoy everything you would have to drive to find and it's in your own backyard! I'm including the menus that will be launched on the dates above. I am excited to show you our new restaurants!

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #18 - April 23rd, 2019, 6:02 pm
    Post #18 - April 23rd, 2019, 6:02 pm Post #18 - April 23rd, 2019, 6:02 pm
    Happy to say that the menus for all three restaurants look very promising.
    "All great change in America begins at the dinner table." Ronald Reagan

    http://midwestmaize.wordpress.com
  • Post #19 - December 9th, 2019, 1:11 am
    Post #19 - December 9th, 2019, 1:11 am Post #19 - December 9th, 2019, 1:11 am
    Brunch at Aboyer yesterday was very good.
    Four of us had a very nice time and by the time we left, the Aboyer space was pretty much filled.
    Entrees ranged from pancakes to Eggs Benedict with lobster.
    https://static1.squarespace.com/static/ ... 6-2019.pdf
    I had Rabbit & Sage Sausage for an appetizer and entree was Croque Madame.
    The Toast for the Croque was the best piece of Toast I have ever eaten.
    Chicken was reported excellent with Morels.
    Pancakes and Eggs Benedict with Lobster, Excellent.
    Everything was hot right from the kitchen, no luke warm anything that was cooked.
    We did take a look at the George Trois space and it certainly looks like a nice quiet spot for fine dining and the dining restrictions do not present a problem for me.
    Michael did visit.
    Very unobtrusive staff!
    Overall, excellent with no problems noted by those of us that checked coats.
    Certainly a continuation on a modern approach to fine French Dining.
    -Richard
    1413FCD7-B313-4289-873C-F20BCEE81F46.jpeg
  • Post #20 - December 30th, 2019, 9:53 pm
    Post #20 - December 30th, 2019, 9:53 pm Post #20 - December 30th, 2019, 9:53 pm
    Excellent dinner at Silencieux. It's an $85 pre-fixe, for which you get a choice of one of 7 or 8 starters (upcharge for the caviar), 7 or 8 entries and 3 or 4 desserts. With the gougeres opener, excellent bread service, and truffle at the end, it's plenty of food.

    The meal was what I've always gotten from this chef: top notch, traditional, French cooking. There are no innovations or unusual dishes, but I pretty much want to lick the last drop of sauce off the plate.
  • Post #21 - September 16th, 2021, 2:27 pm
    Post #21 - September 16th, 2021, 2:27 pm Post #21 - September 16th, 2021, 2:27 pm
    Really just had to smile at the content and tone of an email I received earlier today from Chef Michael and Aboyer . . .

    in an email, Chef Michael Lachowicz wrote:Beginning TONIGHT!!! Sergio, Miguel & I have re-engineered the menu at Aboyer to fit a more traditional, Bistro/Brasserie feel and it is quite spectacular on all fronts. But the most exciting and anticipated part of the new format is the introduction of "Les Classiques Michael". And yes, absolutely call this a comeback because that is exactly what it is. Real Rocky III, eye of the tiger kinda stuff. This section is all about the signature dishes of "Restaurant Michael" and the cooking that brought it such acclaim. The best part is that Miguel and I are the ones who were creating all of these dishes 17 years ago and we are both still here to present them to you all, anew. The Classiques will be on a rotating format so each month new (classic) dishes will appear. Come and see what made us a North Shore phenomenon and experience what you will not be able to find anywhere else!

    Just love seeing someone who's always tinkering and so fired up about their work. :)

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #22 - September 18th, 2021, 5:39 pm
    Post #22 - September 18th, 2021, 5:39 pm Post #22 - September 18th, 2021, 5:39 pm
    A chef buddy in common swears it's the best French food in Chicago.
    "In pursuit of joys untasted"
    from Giuseppe Verdi's La Traviata
  • Post #23 - September 18th, 2021, 7:05 pm
    Post #23 - September 18th, 2021, 7:05 pm Post #23 - September 18th, 2021, 7:05 pm
    Jazzfood wrote:A chef buddy in common swears it's the best French food in Chicago.

    Okay, then. When are we going?

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #24 - September 19th, 2021, 10:04 am
    Post #24 - September 19th, 2021, 10:04 am Post #24 - September 19th, 2021, 10:04 am
    I'd be interested to know how Alain940 ranks his favorite French restaurants now.
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #25 - December 5th, 2021, 9:09 am
    Post #25 - December 5th, 2021, 9:09 am Post #25 - December 5th, 2021, 9:09 am
    Aboyer is pretty awesome. Birthday dinner, price means putting retirement off for a bit, but the service is top notch and the food even better.

    Butternut squash soup was a little sweet but a fried goat cheese raviolo brings it home. More goat cheese and terrific vinaigrette on a salad.
    Bread service may be $9 but was four pieces each of two kinds of bread (the rosemary olive bread had a ridiculously crisp, fine crust, the baguette a little more solid) with butter and tomato tapenade.

    Mains were both from the Michael Classiques: venison with huckleberries, sweet potato, chestnut puree and a truly awesome red wine demi glace sauce (perhaps a bit too much sweet overall, it needed a spicy, savory side); and grilled quail stuffed with truffle risotto, a similar sauce with more truffle.

    Finished with coffee, tea, and chocolate souffle.
    Last edited by JoelF on December 6th, 2021, 2:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #26 - December 6th, 2021, 12:27 pm
    Post #26 - December 6th, 2021, 12:27 pm Post #26 - December 6th, 2021, 12:27 pm
    LOL at terrified vinaigrette. What did you do to it?
  • Post #27 - December 6th, 2021, 2:13 pm
    Post #27 - December 6th, 2021, 2:13 pm Post #27 - December 6th, 2021, 2:13 pm
    bungalowgirl wrote:LOL at terrified vinaigrette. What did you do to it?

    Corrected. Stupid swipe-style phone keyboard. It's tremendously faster than finger-typing when it gets it right, but one really needs to proofread.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #28 - February 20th, 2022, 10:24 am
    Post #28 - February 20th, 2022, 10:24 am Post #28 - February 20th, 2022, 10:24 am
    After at least a decade of occasional visits to the front of the house at Restaurant Michael (now Aboyer)... I finally splurged with good friends to experience fine dining at George Trois, especially because of the currently featured Truffle Menu.

    This was pinnacle fine dining!

    I've always known that Chef Lachowicz had astonishing skills as chef/owner. But this has to be the North Suburban equivalent of the best Chicago's high end restaurants (Oriole, Elizabeth, Alinea et. al.) can offer.

    The menu can be seen at their website, https://georgetroisgroup.com/george-trois. I can say that having experienced meals from Bayless, Trotter, and Achatz in my dining past, this was superior to most of my prior degustation experiences. Every course save the final dessert featured truffles, in one form or another, with precise and artistic plating, and complex flavors in every dish. Particularly outstanding were two main courses, the lobster and rouget served with truffle jus, and the A5 Wagyu steak and Wagyu Raviolo served with slices of Perigord truffle.

    Wine service was also exceptional, with great attention paid to the matching of wines to food. Particularly excellent was an Alsatian white from Marcel Deiss, matched to a fantastic foie gras preparation.

    I rarely dine at this rarefied level these days, but if one is going to splurge, a trip to Winnetka to visit George Trois is completely justified.
  • Post #29 - June 2nd, 2022, 1:59 pm
    Post #29 - June 2nd, 2022, 1:59 pm Post #29 - June 2nd, 2022, 1:59 pm
    With totally new George Trois and Aboyer, chef Michael Lachowicz ‘cut away the fear’ and got back to cooking the food he loves.

    https://www.chicagotribune.com/dining/c ... story.html

    In April, chef Michael Lachowicz took to Facebook to announce a “seismic change” at both of his acclaimed restaurants in suburban Winnetka, Aboyer and George Trois.
“A catapult-like thrust forward is required,” he wrote, with a “complete disregard for tire companies, aristocratic, N.Y. culinary royalty or ratings of any kind aside from the complete happiness and satisfaction of each and every one of my treasured guests.”
    Never order barbecue in a place that also serves quiche - Lewis Grizzard

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