LTH Home

Chicago-style Foods Explained with Pictures

Chicago-style Foods Explained with Pictures
  • Forum HomePost Reply BackTop
    Page 2 of 3
  • Post #31 - December 4th, 2019, 6:30 pm
    Post #31 - December 4th, 2019, 6:30 pm Post #31 - December 4th, 2019, 6:30 pm
    Panther in the Den wrote:Seem like he had little tolerance for David’s suggested corrections.



    On the contrary, he modified the elotes and saganaki sections in accordance with David Hammond's post.
  • Post #32 - December 4th, 2019, 7:28 pm
    Post #32 - December 4th, 2019, 7:28 pm Post #32 - December 4th, 2019, 7:28 pm
    Kman wrote:Can't say it's my thing but clearly some people do enjoy a massive load of starch *in* their sandwich so it's scratching some people's itch.


    The Cleveland Polish Boy does the same thing. A couple years ago, I took a road trip that took me both through Pittsburgh and Cleveland and had a chance to try both Primanti Brothers and a Cleveland Polish Boy. In both cases, I thought the fries would be better on the side and detracted from a reasonable deli sandwich and a really good Polish sausage-barbecue sauce-coleslaw concoction.
  • Post #33 - December 4th, 2019, 10:03 pm
    Post #33 - December 4th, 2019, 10:03 pm Post #33 - December 4th, 2019, 10:03 pm
    I know fries in the sandwich is a very Pittsburgh thing. Fries in gyros were all over Greece... But are gyros a sandwich?
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #34 - December 5th, 2019, 7:00 am
    Post #34 - December 5th, 2019, 7:00 am Post #34 - December 5th, 2019, 7:00 am
    JoelF wrote:I know fries in the sandwich is a very Pittsburgh thing. Fries in gyros were all over Greece... But are gyros a sandwich?


    Uh oh ... don't you start! (Seems I've been in too many of these "are hot dogs a sandwich" and "are tacos a sandwich" type discussions. :) ) I personally would say "yes."
  • Post #35 - December 5th, 2019, 10:27 am
    Post #35 - December 5th, 2019, 10:27 am Post #35 - December 5th, 2019, 10:27 am
    Panther in the Den wrote:
    Kman wrote:Can't say it's my thing but clearly some people do enjoy a massive load of starch *in* their sandwich so it's scratching some people's itch.

    I think it might be all that some people can afford?

    In this season of giving please consider donating to organizations that provide for the homeless.

    The cheapest sandwich at Lucky's Sandwich Company is $11, most are $12/$13 with some hitting $14. Not what I would refer to as "affordable" (but also not outrageous) when compared to other offerings around the city but all things are relative I guess. Or did you intentionally leave out my specific reference for some other purpose?
    Objects in mirror appear to be losing.
  • Post #36 - December 5th, 2019, 10:30 am
    Post #36 - December 5th, 2019, 10:30 am Post #36 - December 5th, 2019, 10:30 am
    Binko wrote:
    Kman wrote:Can't say it's my thing but clearly some people do enjoy a massive load of starch *in* their sandwich so it's scratching some people's itch.


    The Cleveland Polish Boy does the same thing. A couple years ago, I took a road trip that took me both through Pittsburgh and Cleveland and had a chance to try both Primanti Brothers and a Cleveland Polish Boy. In both cases, I thought the fries would be better on the side and detracted from a reasonable deli sandwich and a really good Polish sausage-barbecue sauce-coleslaw concoction.


    Exactly my experience. The few times I've tried these I quickly thought to myself "the fillings seem pretty good but these fries really distract and would be much better as a side". Having given this style several tries I can say it's just not for me.
    Objects in mirror appear to be losing.
  • Post #37 - December 5th, 2019, 10:32 am
    Post #37 - December 5th, 2019, 10:32 am Post #37 - December 5th, 2019, 10:32 am
    Binko wrote:
    JoelF wrote:I know fries in the sandwich is a very Pittsburgh thing. Fries in gyros were all over Greece... But are gyros a sandwich?


    Uh oh ... don't you start! (Seems I've been in too many of these "are hot dogs a sandwich" and "are tacos a sandwich" type discussions. :) ) I personally would say "yes."


    Well gyros are clearly a sandwich since many places selling them offer them as just that on their menus - one can typically order the "gyros sandwich" or the "gyros plate". Now a *plate* is definitely not a sandwich. :lol:
    Objects in mirror appear to be losing.
  • Post #38 - December 5th, 2019, 10:56 am
    Post #38 - December 5th, 2019, 10:56 am Post #38 - December 5th, 2019, 10:56 am
    I had literally stumbled upon Primanti's years ago while in Pitt and very hungry at the time. This was before they became "famous." So I knew nothing about them and actually had a beer to see what type of food crossed by my path before I ordered. I refused to let them put those beautiful fries on my sandwich. They obliged and the meal was great. I don't get the fries on sammy part. To each their own though.
  • Post #39 - December 5th, 2019, 11:43 am
    Post #39 - December 5th, 2019, 11:43 am Post #39 - December 5th, 2019, 11:43 am
    Puckjam wrote:I had literally stumbled upon Primanti's years ago while in Pitt and very hungry at the time. This was before they became "famous." So I knew nothing about them and actually had a beer to see what type of food crossed by my path before I ordered. I refused to let them put those beautiful fries on my sandwich. They obliged and the meal was great. I don't get the fries on sammy part. To each their own though.


    This is a digression, but, it's not just sandwiches, right? I recall ordering a grilled chicken Caesar salad in Pittsburgh a few years back and was surprised, after removing about a pound of shredded mozzarella from the top, to find a full serving of french fries under the grilled chicken breast but on top of the lettuce. It seems like a more general "fries with everything rule".
  • Post #40 - December 5th, 2019, 12:29 pm
    Post #40 - December 5th, 2019, 12:29 pm Post #40 - December 5th, 2019, 12:29 pm
    Kman wrote:
    Binko wrote:
    Kman wrote:Can't say it's my thing but clearly some people do enjoy a massive load of starch *in* their sandwich so it's scratching some people's itch.


    The Cleveland Polish Boy does the same thing. A couple years ago, I took a road trip that took me both through Pittsburgh and Cleveland and had a chance to try both Primanti Brothers and a Cleveland Polish Boy. In both cases, I thought the fries would be better on the side and detracted from a reasonable deli sandwich and a really good Polish sausage-barbecue sauce-coleslaw concoction.


    Exactly my experience. The few times I've tried these I quickly thought to myself "the fillings seem pretty good but these fries really distract and would be much better as a side". Having given this style several tries I can say it's just not for me.


    I am not a fan in general of the carb-on-carb style of sandwich. However, the best Polish Boy I had in Cleveland was also the cheapest and simplest, from Mt. Pleasant BBQ on Kinsman Ave. Still, I think I ate the majority of the fries off the top before digging into the Polish.
    Ronnie said I should probably tell you guys about my website so

    Hey I have a website.
    http://www.sandwichtribunal.com
  • Post #41 - December 5th, 2019, 2:28 pm
    Post #41 - December 5th, 2019, 2:28 pm Post #41 - December 5th, 2019, 2:28 pm
    Can't believe someone else from around here is familiar with Mt. Pleasant BBQ. Absolutely my favorite Greasehouse in Cleveland. Not only do they serve the classic Polish Boy (deep fried Polish sausage topped with slaw, fries, and BBQ Sauce), they also offer a Polish Boy Deluxe (aka PB Deluxe), which adds pulled pork to the party. It is an unholy mess and quite tasty.

    Buddy

    Mt. Pleasant BBQ
    12725 Kinsman Rd.
    Cleveland, OH 44120
    (216) 561-8722
  • Post #42 - December 5th, 2019, 2:51 pm
    Post #42 - December 5th, 2019, 2:51 pm Post #42 - December 5th, 2019, 2:51 pm
    Primanti's what can I say? Decent sandwich without the fries. I grok the backstory; filling workers' bellies yada yada yada. I am not a fan of carbs on carbs; seems a little shtetle, a food mish-mash born out of need that somehow became a regional favorite. Point being; Manhattan and the boroughs do something similar. When I seamless from whatever bodega I get a s-load of crappy moist fries alongside my lamb on rice, gyro, burger, whatever. They are akin to packing peanuts and go directly into the trash. Not "added value," more "crap."
    Being gauche rocks, stun the bourgeoisie
  • Post #43 - December 5th, 2019, 5:01 pm
    Post #43 - December 5th, 2019, 5:01 pm Post #43 - December 5th, 2019, 5:01 pm
    French fry sandwiches are one thing; potato chip (or crisp) sandwiches are a whole other.

    https://www.theguardian.com/food/2019/dec/05/how-to-eat-a-crisp-sandwich?CMP=fb_gu&utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Facebook&fbclid=IwAR2UUu9SDQ5FyznZcl88dhmR4l7R5DDJf_0MpahJCKUJXgbKHmohyI5mOl8#Echobox=1575554446
    "Don't you ever underestimate the power of a female." Bootsy Collins
  • Post #44 - December 5th, 2019, 5:34 pm
    Post #44 - December 5th, 2019, 5:34 pm Post #44 - December 5th, 2019, 5:34 pm
    Certainly, none of these can compare with a Pixy Stix/Cap’n Crunch combo.
    https://youtu.be/a77zylQKNEw
  • Post #45 - December 5th, 2019, 8:04 pm
    Post #45 - December 5th, 2019, 8:04 pm Post #45 - December 5th, 2019, 8:04 pm
    BuddyRoadhouse wrote: they also offer a Polish Boy Deluxe (aka PB Deluxe), which adds pulled pork to the party. It is an unholy mess and quite tasty.


    Which is also served as a "Polish Girl" at other Cleveland joints. I was going to say that this was the only case I remember of a "feminine"-named version of a dish being the more "gilded" one, but then I remembered the croque monsiuer vs the croque madame.
  • Post #46 - December 7th, 2019, 11:32 am
    Post #46 - December 7th, 2019, 11:32 am Post #46 - December 7th, 2019, 11:32 am
    Binko wrote:
    BuddyRoadhouse wrote: they also offer a Polish Boy Deluxe (aka PB Deluxe), which adds pulled pork to the party. It is an unholy mess and quite tasty.


    Which is also served as a "Polish Girl" at other Cleveland joints. I was going to say that this was the only case I remember of a "feminine"-named version of a dish being the more "gilded" one, but then I remembered the croque monsiuer vs the croque madame.


    Interesting point about the more gilded "male" versions of dishes, such as the Mother in Law at Fat Johnnies compared to the Father in Law, which is the same "sandwich" with added cheese; at A&W, I the only difference between Mama Burger and Papa Burger (and for that matter, Baby Burger) is size.
    "Don't you ever underestimate the power of a female." Bootsy Collins
  • Post #47 - December 13th, 2019, 11:14 am
    Post #47 - December 13th, 2019, 11:14 am Post #47 - December 13th, 2019, 11:14 am
    Some french fry sandwiches from Al's Italian Beef's Secret Menu.

    Veggie Burger
    Burger. Substitute fries for burger patty

    The Al's Poor Boy
    Gravy bread with fries on it

    https://www.dnainfo.com/chicago/2015052 ... -watering/

    “... can be ordered at any of Al’s #1 Italian Beef’s Chicago spots and other franchise locations.”
    "Very good... but not my favorite." ~ Johnny Depp as Roux the Gypsy in Chocolat
  • Post #48 - December 13th, 2019, 6:31 pm
    Post #48 - December 13th, 2019, 6:31 pm Post #48 - December 13th, 2019, 6:31 pm
    Panther in the Den wrote:Some french fry sandwiches from Al's Italian Beef's Secret Menu.

    Veggie Burger
    Burger. Substitute fries for burger patty

    The Al's Poor Boy
    Gravy bread with fries on it

    https://www.dnainfo.com/chicago/2015052 ... -watering/

    “... can be ordered at any of Al’s #1 Italian Beef’s Chicago spots and other franchise locations.”


    I admit, I am somewhat intrigued by the Chicago-style poutine on that page sold as "gypsy fries." I'm not sure it would go better than a proper beef sandwich after a hard night of drinking, but I'm happy to give it a shot one day.
  • Post #49 - December 16th, 2019, 8:07 pm
    Post #49 - December 16th, 2019, 8:07 pm Post #49 - December 16th, 2019, 8:07 pm
    All this fry talk reminds me of something. I think a strong case can be made for the fries themselves being a distinctive Chicago style specialty. I never saw a fry cutter mounted on the wall before I moved to Chicago, and I had only ever had double cooked fries at Belgian pubs. Here the fresh cut, double cooked, browned and crispy fries are all over the place and almost a given at many fast food stands. Chicago is an unusually great french fry city, maybe even the best in the country.
    Image
  • Post #50 - December 19th, 2019, 10:03 pm
    Post #50 - December 19th, 2019, 10:03 pm Post #50 - December 19th, 2019, 10:03 pm
    oh shit I finally clicked on the link and read the article and dude stole the Mother-In-Law photo from my website! My photo, with my plate and my tablecloth. It says right on the site that it's fine to use my photos if you give credit and link back to the site, and he couldn't even be bothered to do that. Though he probably grabbed it right off a Google Image Search without even checking the source.

    The original is at https://www.sandwichtribunal.com/2017/1 ... er-in-law/
    Ronnie said I should probably tell you guys about my website so

    Hey I have a website.
    http://www.sandwichtribunal.com
  • Post #51 - December 19th, 2019, 11:02 pm
    Post #51 - December 19th, 2019, 11:02 pm Post #51 - December 19th, 2019, 11:02 pm
    Re: theft.

    This list has been reconfigured, so now the first item mentioned is the Atomic Cake. Reading it, I thought it sounded familiar, and quickly found that it was cribbed from a piece by Louisa Chu from 2017:

    https://www.chicagotribune.com/dining/craving/ct-chicago-atomic-cake-food-0315-20170310-story.html
    "Don't you ever underestimate the power of a female." Bootsy Collins
  • Post #52 - December 20th, 2019, 12:07 am
    Post #52 - December 20th, 2019, 12:07 am Post #52 - December 20th, 2019, 12:07 am
    JimTheBeerGuy wrote:oh shit I finally clicked on the link and read the article and dude stole the Mother-In-Law photo from my website! My photo, with my plate and my tablecloth.

    David Hammond wrote:Reading it, I thought it sounded familiar, and quickly found that it was cribbed from a piece by Louisa Chu from 2017:

    What a putz, and the stuff from L Chu is verbatim.
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #53 - December 20th, 2019, 6:52 am
    Post #53 - December 20th, 2019, 6:52 am Post #53 - December 20th, 2019, 6:52 am
    You'd think a "History Journal" would be familiar with the concept of citing sources.
    Ronnie said I should probably tell you guys about my website so

    Hey I have a website.
    http://www.sandwichtribunal.com
  • Post #54 - December 20th, 2019, 8:00 am
    Post #54 - December 20th, 2019, 8:00 am Post #54 - December 20th, 2019, 8:00 am
    We were back in CDMX recently and encountered Klein's Deli, home of the fried salami and french fry taco:

    Image
  • Post #55 - December 20th, 2019, 9:38 am
    Post #55 - December 20th, 2019, 9:38 am Post #55 - December 20th, 2019, 9:38 am
    spinynorman99 wrote:We were back in CDMX recently and encountered Klein's Deli, home of the fried salami and french fry taco:

    Those look oddly good.
    -Mary
  • Post #56 - December 20th, 2019, 10:21 am
    Post #56 - December 20th, 2019, 10:21 am Post #56 - December 20th, 2019, 10:21 am
    Fun game you can play: spot the plagiarism. Dr. Gale's paragraphs about Malort are lifted word-for-word, without attribution, from Wikipedia (known as a rock solid source for historians everywhere); cf. the history section of the entry:

    [url]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeppson%27s_Malört[/url]

    Okay, now I've got to let this go, though I'm pretty sure we've located only a few of the unnamed sources for this odd, odd listing.
    "Don't you ever underestimate the power of a female." Bootsy Collins
  • Post #57 - December 20th, 2019, 10:48 am
    Post #57 - December 20th, 2019, 10:48 am Post #57 - December 20th, 2019, 10:48 am
    Or maybe I won't let this go just yet. I'll be on WGN with Dane Neal tonight from 7-11, and I will be talking about Chicago original foods (as well as fish boils, archaeology at Montpelier, whale watching and other random topics), so perhaps I will bring up the disservice performed by sites such as Dr. Gale's, which promulgate false information, resist correction and plagiarize the works of others. I have no wish to be mean or vindictive, but I feel this is an issue worth addressing.
    "Don't you ever underestimate the power of a female." Bootsy Collins
  • Post #58 - December 20th, 2019, 11:22 am
    Post #58 - December 20th, 2019, 11:22 am Post #58 - December 20th, 2019, 11:22 am
    The GP wrote:
    spinynorman99 wrote:We were back in CDMX recently and encountered Klein's Deli, home of the fried salami and french fry taco:

    Those look oddly good.


    Nothing odd about it, from my perspective.
  • Post #59 - December 20th, 2019, 11:38 am
    Post #59 - December 20th, 2019, 11:38 am Post #59 - December 20th, 2019, 11:38 am
    G Wiv wrote:
    JimTheBeerGuy wrote:oh shit I finally clicked on the link and read the article and dude stole the Mother-In-Law photo from my website! My photo, with my plate and my tablecloth.

    David Hammond wrote:Reading it, I thought it sounded familiar, and quickly found that it was cribbed from a piece by Louisa Chu from 2017:

    What a putz, and the stuff from L Chu is verbatim.

    Dr Neil Gale, PhD stole a photo from me too, without asking or attributing. I thought about telling him take it down, but decided it wasn't worth the trouble.

    David Hammond wrote:Okay, now I've got to let this go, though I'm pretty sure we've located only a few of the unnamed sources for this odd, odd listing.

    There's lots more outright plagiarism. Not to worry though, it's okay.

    Dr Neil Gale, PhD wrote:Because this Journal is a not-for-profit and is not academically funded, plagiarism is a non-issue.

    WTF?
    Last edited by Rene G on December 21st, 2019, 1:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.
  • Post #60 - December 20th, 2019, 11:23 pm
    Post #60 - December 20th, 2019, 11:23 pm Post #60 - December 20th, 2019, 11:23 pm
    Rene G wrote:
    David Hammond wrote:Okay, now I've got to let this go, though I'm pretty sure we've located only a few of the unnamed sources for this odd, odd listing.

    There's lots more outright plagiarism.

    Some examples . . .

    Atomic Cake

    Dr Neil Gale wrote:The Atomic Cake has been the centerpiece of choice at birthday celebrations and other rites of passage, from first to last, for generations of Chicagoans on the South Side. Born in the optimistic Atomic Era for which it is named, and coupled with the baby boom, it's no wonder it became an iconic birthday cake. Yet, perhaps because of a geographic and generational divide, many Chicagoans have never heard of it.

    "You start with, a layer of banana cake topped with a banana filling, with Bavarian cream custard and freshly sliced bananas," says Calumet Bakery owner Kerry Moore. "Then you put on a layer of yellow cake topped with a strawberry filling, with fresh sliced strawberries in glaze and strawberry cream. Then you put on a layer of chocolate cake with fudge on top. You ice it up, more times than not with whipped cream, but some people like buttercream, and that's it."

    Louisa Chu in Chicago Tribune wrote:The Atomic Cake has been the centerpiece of choice at birthday celebrations and other rites of passage, from first to last, for generations of Chicagoans on the South Side. Born in the optimistic Atomic Era for which it is named, and coupled with the baby boom, it's no wonder it became an iconic birthday cake. Yet, perhaps because of a geographic and generational divide, many Chicagoans have never heard of it.

    What is this cake?

    "You start with, a layer of banana cake topped with a banana filling, with Bavarian cream custard and fresh sliced bananas," says Calumet Bakery owner Kerry Moore. "Then you put on a layer of yellow cake topped with a strawberry filling, with fresh sliced strawberries in glaze and strawberry cream. Then you put on a layer of chocolate cake with fudge on top. You ice it up, more times than not with whipped cream, but some people like buttercream, and that's it."


    Breaded Steak

    Dr Neil Gale wrote:This sandwich is an Italian feast on a roll. It originated on the South Side of Chicago and continues to be one of our city's favorite sandwiches. Slices of beef are simply breaded and deep-fried, dipped into a marinara sauce, then placed in a dinner roll. The steak is usually topped with mozzarella cheese, sweet peppers and/or hot or mild giardiniera. There is nothing refined about the Chicago-Style Breaded Steak Sandwich. This flavorful sandwich is gooey, messy, and filling.

    Great Chicago Italian Recipes wrote:A breaded steak sandwich is an Italian feast on a roll. It originated on the Southside of Chicago and continues to be one of our favorite sandwiches. It is definitely right up there with our Chicago-Style Beef Sandwich and Deep Dish Pizza.

    Thin slices of beef are simply breaded and deep fried, dipped into a marinara sauce, placed in a dinner roll. Then the steak is usually topped with mozzarella cheese, sweet peppers and/or hot or mild giardinaira. It is a flavorful sandwich that is very rich and fulfilling.

    There is nothing refined about the Chicago-Style Breaded Steak Sandwich. It is gooey and messy but oh so delicious.


    Chicken Vesuvio

    Dr Neil Gale wrote:The origins of the Italian-American dish are unknown, but some suggest it might have been popularized by the Vesuvio Restaurant, which operated at 15 East Wacker Drive, Chicago, in the 1930s. Other food historians have suggested that variants of Chicken Vesuvio can be found among the chicken dishes of the traditional cuisines of southern Italy.
    Chicken Vesuvio is a dish made from chicken on the bone and wedges of potato sauteed with garlic, oregano, white wine, and olive oil, then baked until the chicken's skin becomes crisp. The casserole is often garnished with a few green peas for color, although some more modern variations may omit some of these. In Chicago, one also often finds the technique applied to other foods, like "steak Vesuvio," "pork chops Vesuvio," or even just "Vesuvio potatoes."

    Wikipedia wrote:Chicken Vesuvio, a specialty of Chicago, is an Italian-American dish made from chicken on the bone and wedges of potato sauteed with garlic, oregano, white wine, and olive oil, then baked until the chicken's skin becomes crisp. The casserole is often garnished with a few green peas for color, although some more modern variations may omit some of these.

    In Chicago, one also often finds the technique applied to other foods, like "steak Vesuvio", "pork chops Vesuvio", or even just "Vesuvio potatoes".

    The origins of the dish are unknown, but some suggest it might have been popularized by the Vesuvio Restaurant, which operated at 15 E. Wacker Drive, Chicago, in the 1930s. Other food historians have suggested that variants of Chicken Vesuvio can be found among the chicken dishes of the traditional cuisines of southern Italy.


    Giardiniera

    Dr Neil Gale wrote:Giardiniera ("jar-din-air-ah") wasn't invented in Chicago. It originated in Italy, where it means mixed pickles. This fiery mix contains some combination of pickled chiles, celery, cauliflower, carrots, and olives submerged in oil. Giardiniera adds instant heat, crunch, and acid to many of our city's iconic foods, including Italian beef and sausages, Italian subs and deep-dish pizza.

    Nick Kindelsperger in Chicago Tribune wrote:Everyone understands the risk of handing a Chicagoan ketchup, so what's the right condiment to pass? That's easy. Giardiniera. (Say it with me, "jar-din-air-ah.") It's the quintessential Chicago condiment, one that's as brazen and boisterous as the city itself.

    This fiery mix contains some combination of pickled chiles, celery, cauliflower, carrots and olives submerged in oil. Like an edible exclamation point, giardiniera adds instant heat, crunch and acid to many of our city's iconic foods, including Italian beefs, Italian subs and deep-dish pizza.
    . . .
    As important as it is here, giardiniera wasn't invented in Chicago. It originated in Italy, where it means mixed pickles.

    There are more examples, but I think you get the idea.

Contact

About

Team

Advertize

Close

Chat

Articles

Guide

Events

more