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Restaurants in the era of social distancing

Restaurants in the era of social distancing
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  • Post #211 - May 18th, 2020, 6:44 pm
    Post #211 - May 18th, 2020, 6:44 pm Post #211 - May 18th, 2020, 6:44 pm
    gastro gnome wrote:
    DClose wrote:Daisies is going both a reduced menu to go as well as lasagna kits


    I also liked the look off Daisies' kits, but according to their website, they are no longer doing take-away.

    Out of concern for the health and safety of our staff and patrons we are making the difficult decision to temporarily close our doors until we get the go ahead to reopen for service. The sense of community we have received from not only our Logan Square neighbors but the Chicago dining scene as a whole has been humbling to say the least. We thank everyone who has come out to support us in our transition to a takeout model During this break we are focusing on self care and coming back stronger and better than ever. In the meantime, please consider donating to the staffs go fund me. We look forward to seeing you all on the other side.


    I suspect we'll see a bunch of other places that are new to this model decide to switch up their offering or shut it down entirely depending on how things are going for them.

    Per an email, they're back up and running, with their dinner menu available for contactless carryout from 4-8pm Wednesday thru Saturday. Frustratingly and curiously, not a single link or a phone number is provided in the email. :roll:

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #212 - May 19th, 2020, 7:49 am
    Post #212 - May 19th, 2020, 7:49 am Post #212 - May 19th, 2020, 7:49 am
    Hi- There is a Facebook group called Supporting Evanston Restaurants that somebody started to help out Evanston restaurants during the pandemic, and one of the restaurants that sounds interesting is Spoonfoolery, which is at 2301 W. Greenleaf in Evanston. It is a childrens cooking school which is owned by somebody from India. Because of the pandemic she can not have any cooking classes there, and so she has started offering takeout Indian fusion food. I think you order the food on Wednesdays, and then you pick it up on either Thursday or Friday. I think you get to pick the day. Here is the link to the menu.
    https://www.spoonfoolery.com/indian-fusion-takeout
  • Post #213 - May 20th, 2020, 3:28 pm
    Post #213 - May 20th, 2020, 3:28 pm Post #213 - May 20th, 2020, 3:28 pm
    Gov. J.B. Pritzker on Wednesday announced he would allow bars and restaurants to open for outdoor seating on May 29 when the state is expected to enter its next phase for reopening businesses.

    Pritzker’s gradual reopening plan previously did not allow bars and restaurants to open to dine-in service until phase four, which regions of the state would not hit until late June. However, the governor announced he’s reconsidered that stance after consulting with individuals in the bar and restaurant industry and will allow those establishments to hold outdoor dining only in phase three, which all regions of the state are expected to meet next week.

    “We have to put public health first, and that means the safety of consumers and employees alike, but the epidemiologists now believe that summer offers us an opportunity,” Pritzker said. “Today, I’m announcing an additional option for bars and restaurants interested in resuming operations early, opening for outdoor seating when phase three begins likely for everyone just nine days from now.”

    https://www.chicagotribune.com/coronavi ... story.html
    Never order barbecue in a place that also serves quiche - Lewis Grizzard
  • Post #214 - June 22nd, 2020, 7:55 pm
    Post #214 - June 22nd, 2020, 7:55 pm Post #214 - June 22nd, 2020, 7:55 pm
    I drove past Walker Brothers in Wilmette today, and I noticed they had set up tables for outdoor dining in the parking lot on the north side of the building. They were really widely spaced (maybe 10-12 feet apart), which is great for those of us who are concerned about how much distancing we'll get.
  • Post #215 - June 23rd, 2020, 9:31 am
    Post #215 - June 23rd, 2020, 9:31 am Post #215 - June 23rd, 2020, 9:31 am
    nsxtasy wrote:I drove past Walker Brothers in Wilmette today, and I noticed they had set up tables for outdoor dining in the parking lot on the north side of the building. They were really widely spaced (maybe 10-12 feet apart), which is great for those of us who are concerned about how much distancing we'll get.

    Highland Park location is also outside in Port Clinton square.
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #216 - June 24th, 2020, 8:06 am
    Post #216 - June 24th, 2020, 8:06 am Post #216 - June 24th, 2020, 8:06 am
    According to a release from the mayor’s office, the new dining areas, which will go into effect over the weekend, are:

    Balmoral Avenue on both sides of Clark Street in Andersonville;
    Chinatown Square at Archer Avenue between Wentworth and Princeton avenues in Chinatown.
    Taylor Street, from Loomis Street to Ashland Avenue in the Little Italy neighborhood.
    Oliphant Avenue from Northwest Highway to an alley just north of the Northwest Highway in Edison Park.
    And sidewalk dining on 75th Street between Indiana and Calumet avenues in the Chatham neighborhood.

    https://www.chicagotribune.com/coronavi ... story.html
    Never order barbecue in a place that also serves quiche - Lewis Grizzard
  • Post #217 - June 27th, 2020, 9:53 am
    Post #217 - June 27th, 2020, 9:53 am Post #217 - June 27th, 2020, 9:53 am
    HI,

    A report from the front:

    Last week I was supposed to meet my cousin at Barnaby's in Northbrook. The plan was to pick up a pizza, then head over to my home. It was cancelled and rescheduled to this week.

    Yesterday was the first day one could eat inside a restaurant. If we could eat-in, then we would stay otherwise it was pick up and go home. Barnaby's was open for dining-in. If lunch time was any indication, there is not much enthusiasm about eating in.

    We ordered our food with everyone mask-on, got our plates and utensils to wait for our number.

    We sat in the raised area in the front with nobody near us by at least 30 feet. By being near the door, we did see people coming and going. When not eating, we preferred to be mask-on.

    There was no cheese and crackers available.

    There was no bussing of the table. Dishes piled up and sat. No water service, though I don't remember if water was served or topped off earlier.

    There were so few customers, they nowhere near approached 25% seating.

    Driving home, I passed the commuter parking lot in Highland Park. There were very few cars present. Downtown Highland Park had many parking spots free. Prior to all this, finding parking in Highland Park was an endless headache. Not now and goodness knows when it may be.

    Regards,
    CAthy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #218 - June 27th, 2020, 4:13 pm
    Post #218 - June 27th, 2020, 4:13 pm Post #218 - June 27th, 2020, 4:13 pm
    So today I had my first pandemic food service Nope Nope Nope.
    Stopped at Wendy's in Zion for quick cheap food, hand a sawbuck to the cashier at the drive-up window then notice her mask is below her nose. I'm about to just complain but deal with it when the person handing her orders also has her nose sticking out. So I say, "forget it, just give me my money back, you folks aren't sanitary." She has to get a manager to void the order, which takes several minutes, and SHE's hanging out of her mask too. At that point I almost drove off without getting my refund. I'm telling her that her staff is unsanitary and she's saying she didn't know because she's in the back room. Sheesh.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #219 - July 4th, 2020, 3:03 pm
    Post #219 - July 4th, 2020, 3:03 pm Post #219 - July 4th, 2020, 3:03 pm
    I was curious what El Ideas had on offer for curbside these days, so I popped over to the site and discovered, as far as I can tell, that curbside is ... done? They have reservation links for tables and also to get the entire restaurant to yourself (lol, why not just have a donation button?), and that's all you see when you click "curbside delivery." I guess maybe the window of carryout opportunity has closed as places start to open up again, but while I get it I also think it's a little short-sighted. Not only are many not really comfortable going out again any time soon, no matter what "phase" we've hit, but it wouldn't take much bad news to pull the state back to a previous stage/phase again. I understand if it's really too much trouble, but continuing curbside meals (no matter the restaurant) seems to me a good idea until the coast is totally clear.

    As far as fine dining goes, for example, it looks like Alinea has kept carryout an option even as it opens up some semblance of dining, but I have no idea how long that is going to last (or if they will continue to devise new meals). I think I saw that all the One Off restaurants are planning to end special service curbside as well. Anyway, is this a new trend?

    Editing to add: Though you know, the more I think about it I suppose the more I understand. They weren't offering their full menus for takeout before and now they are, or at least the restaurants that traditionally had takeout before presumably are once again, so there is always that option. Still, I like the idea of family meal packages and rotating special offerings available for curbside. It actually enticed me to try some new places or travel outside of my (former) usual rotation of destinations.
  • Post #220 - July 5th, 2020, 1:26 pm
    Post #220 - July 5th, 2020, 1:26 pm Post #220 - July 5th, 2020, 1:26 pm
    Bittersweet return to Dolo. Everything on point. Ordered in advance, got there and couldn't get past the vestibule, staff wearing masks and gloves... only thing missing was my eating partner stevez. We'd probably been there 20 times.
    Image
    "In pursuit of joys untasted"
    from Giuseppe Verdi's La Traviata
  • Post #221 - July 6th, 2020, 8:50 am
    Post #221 - July 6th, 2020, 8:50 am Post #221 - July 6th, 2020, 8:50 am
    From the National Restaurant News daily newsletter:

    "A team at JP Morgan undertook extensive analysis of credit card data and consumer spending habits over the past few months and overlaid that data on top of the new infection case tracker maintained by Johns Hopkins University. Keep in mind this database is one of the most frequently cited by the media, public health officials and policy makers. What the JP Morgan analysts found was quite disturbing. They were able to draw a direct correlation between the amount and frequency of in-restaurant spending and rates of new infections, and conversely, they found that the higher supermarket spending in a given region, the lower the infection rates. In short, the research showed that supermarkets were demonstrably safer and inferred that those who stayed at home to eat were facing lower risks. The study went on to say that in-restaurant spending was the single biggest predictor in a rise in new infections. Not good."

    https://www.nrn.com/operations/opinion- ... rust-issue

    Here is a link to the study:

    https://www.jpmorgan.com/jpmpdf/1320748725329.pdf
  • Post #222 - July 6th, 2020, 10:48 am
    Post #222 - July 6th, 2020, 10:48 am Post #222 - July 6th, 2020, 10:48 am
    jlawrence01 wrote:From the National Restaurant News daily newsletter:

    "A team at JP Morgan undertook extensive analysis of credit card data and consumer spending habits over the past few months and overlaid that data on top of the new infection case tracker maintained by Johns Hopkins University. Keep in mind this database is one of the most frequently cited by the media, public health officials and policy makers. What the JP Morgan analysts found was quite disturbing. They were able to draw a direct correlation between the amount and frequency of in-restaurant spending and rates of new infections, and conversely, they found that the higher supermarket spending in a given region, the lower the infection rates. In short, the research showed that supermarkets were demonstrably safer and inferred that those who stayed at home to eat were facing lower risks. The study went on to say that in-restaurant spending was the single biggest predictor in a rise in new infections. Not good."

    https://www.nrn.com/operations/opinion- ... rust-issue

    Here is a link to the study:

    https://www.jpmorgan.com/jpmpdf/1320748725329.pdf



    Wow! The impact of this pandemic is incredible.
    Ava-"If you get down and out, just get in the kitchen and bake a cake."- Jean Strickland

    Horto In Urbs- Falling in love with Urban Vegetable Gardening
  • Post #223 - July 6th, 2020, 11:02 am
    Post #223 - July 6th, 2020, 11:02 am Post #223 - July 6th, 2020, 11:02 am
    While in restaurant dining may be an excellent predictor of new infections, there is no evidence that restaurant dining is an inherent cause of increased infections. This goes under the statistical rubric “correlation does not imply causation”.

    In this case it could easily be a matter of increased infections and increased dining both being due to a populace that is less concerned, and therefore less careful, about suffering from Covid-19. In other words, infections and restaurant dining are correlated not because of a causal relationship, but because they share a common cause - a lax population.

    Unfortunately, most people finding out about the correlation will immediately assume causation.
  • Post #224 - July 6th, 2020, 12:02 pm
    Post #224 - July 6th, 2020, 12:02 pm Post #224 - July 6th, 2020, 12:02 pm
    scottsol wrote:While in restaurant dining may be an excellent predictor of new infections, there is no evidence that restaurant dining is an inherent cause of increased infections. This goes under the statistical rubric “correlation does not imply causation”.

    In this case it could easily be a matter of increased infections and increased dining both being due to a populace that is less concerned, and therefore less careful, about suffering from Covid-19. In other words, infections and restaurant dining are correlated not because of a causal relationship, but because they share a common cause - a lax population.

    Unfortunately, most people finding out about the correlation will immediately assume causation.


    I'm not sure what the point of your post is, but at best it seems misinformed...and flat-out dangerous at worst. Just because correlation does not always equal causation does not mean correlation should be ignored. Plus, direct causation studies and experiments are often very difficult, impossible, and/or unethical to conduct as a pandemic is raging. Correlation studies are often the best/most ethical option (and whether the cause is "dining in," lax diners who just prefer to dine in, or something else we're not thinking of....the end result is the same: more people get infected in enclosed spaces.

    Somewhat related: I just finished a three week stay in the upper peninsula. We ate one meal out (on a patio); two visits to a brewery with beer garden; and a few drive-through/takeout meals (obviously, the majority of our meals were prepared at our (temporary) home).

    The one meal out, I'd take back...and the restaurant did a pretty great job. There was at least 5 to 10 feet between us and other tables. No physical menus (QR codes were posted on the tables). Our server always wore a mask, and we wore masks when not at the table. Still, it just didn't feel worth it. The food was okay (slightly elevated bar food); but I was anxious the whole time. It wasn't worth the money/anxiety.

    Beer garden was nice, but it was never very crowded (10 to 20 feet between tables). Barkeeps wore masks...but patrons sitting at the bar were not. Still, it was nice to sit outside, and all pints were only $3 each at all times.

    Takeout/drive-through. I was continually impressed and will continue to do these. Workers consistently had masks on everywhere, and took steps to minimize contact.

    Long story short, I'm a long way from dining in a room that isn't mine.
  • Post #225 - July 6th, 2020, 12:33 pm
    Post #225 - July 6th, 2020, 12:33 pm Post #225 - July 6th, 2020, 12:33 pm
    While in restaurant dining may be an excellent predictor of new infections, there is no evidence that restaurant dining is an inherent cause of increased infections. This goes under the statistical rubric “correlation does not imply causation”.

    I think that is either accidentally or purposely missing the point. The point is correlation.

    In this case it could easily be a matter of increased infections and increased dining both being due to a populace that is less concerned, and therefore less careful, about suffering from Covid-19. In other words, infections and restaurant dining are correlated not because of a causal relationship, but because they share a common cause - a lax population.

    If you are a lawyer or aggrieved (i.e., infected) consumer looking for someone in the restaurant business to sue, you will be disappointed that what we see here is only correlation, not causation. Everyone else should take the correlation very seriously. There are many situations in which correlation is no less serious for not shedding light on causation.

    Indeed, you have put your finger on the cause: a lax population.
    "Your swimming suit matches your eyes, you hold your nose before diving, loving you has made me bananas!"
  • Post #226 - July 6th, 2020, 8:50 pm
    Post #226 - July 6th, 2020, 8:50 pm Post #226 - July 6th, 2020, 8:50 pm
    Katie wrote:I think that is either accidentally or purposely missing the point. The point is correlation.


    From the quoted NRN newsletter:

    In short, the research showed that supermarkets were demonstrably safer....

    Well, that’s simply wrong. What we know is that hot spot states are demonstrably more dangerous.
    Last edited by scottsol on July 6th, 2020, 9:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.
  • Post #227 - July 6th, 2020, 9:06 pm
    Post #227 - July 6th, 2020, 9:06 pm Post #227 - July 6th, 2020, 9:06 pm
    jellob1976 wrote:I'm not sure what the point of your post is, but at best it seems misinformed...and flat-out dangerous at worst. Just because correlation does not always equal causation does not mean correlation should be ignored.


    I have little doubt that restaurants in hot spot states tend to be rather dangerous. Not so much because restaurants are especially dangerous, but because both the customers and proprietors in those states are not adhering to safe practices. I remember a video of an unmasked waitress in Texas hugging an unmasked customer. It is probably also true that in a hot spot state it is more likely that some of the other diners will be infected.

    If a restaurant follows the best practices and enforces those practices by their customers they should be reasonably safe. Perhaps not as safe as not dining out at all, but not a death trap.
  • Post #228 - Today, 7:47 am
    Post #228 - Today, 7:47 am Post #228 - Today, 7:47 am
    I think, at least as I understand it, that study failed or was unable to distinguish between dining in, pick-up and delivery, which are pretty significant distinctions. They strictly looked at restaurant credit card scans.

    Re: supermarkets, considering those are among the few businesses that have stayed, well, busy throughout this ordeal, it's kind of remarkable they have not yet been proven sites of significant transmission. Some hypotheses I've encountered note that people generally do not spend much time in supermarkets (vs bars and restaurants), they do not remain stationary, and the size of the stores allows for greater air flow and circulation. Also, as I understand it the likelihood of contracting Covid from packaging and the like is small, compared to through the air/airborne particulates when in close proximity to a carrier.

    Drove up to WI for a beer-run boondoggle with my daughter yesterday, and most places (including Woodman's) seemed to be masked up and adhering to at the least common sense guidelines. But we stopped at the Brat Stop on the way back, and none of the employees were wearing masks, including the servers in the dining area (where naturally none of the diners were wearing masks, but also were not distanced). Needless to say, it did not make me comfortable or confident, but at least we (and other shoppers) were not made to feel like weirdos for wearing masks.
  • Post #229 - 36 minutes ago
    Post #229 - 36 minutes ago Post #229 - 36 minutes ago
    Your experience at the Brat Stop is typical of most places up here. Maybe in the city of Milwaukee, they are a bit more careful, but outside of the city your experience is very typical. Goofy times.

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