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Crave Kabob, New Skokie Middle Eastern

Crave Kabob, New Skokie Middle Eastern
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  • Crave Kabob, New Skokie Middle Eastern

    Post #1 - September 13th, 2020, 1:49 pm
    Post #1 - September 13th, 2020, 1:49 pm Post #1 - September 13th, 2020, 1:49 pm
    Crave Kabob replaces striving to mediocre West of Edens. Open less than a week as of this post. Bright cheerful, friendly service, seems to be going for a Pita Inn/Chipotle quick counter service take-out, dine-in vibe.

    I tried my Middle Eastern benchmarks, hummus and falafel. Enjoyed the hummus, smooth, nicely presented, maybe a little too much lemon juice. Falafel ~fine~ herby, crisp, though slightly dense and not fresh from the fryer. Pita room temp, sliced in half, nothing special.

    They had doogh/ayran, which I love, though it was $2.95, a little on the high side. Tahini sauce came with the falafel, though when I asked for hot sauce the friendly smiling clerk said .75c. I asked if it was house-made and said, .75c for a small container it should be terrific. One of the guys cooking, maybe manager or owner, said no charge. Its house made and tasty, but .75c for a small plastic container is a bit over the top.

    Mainly Middle Eastern with a smattering of Greek menu items. Three autodoners cranking out Shawarma and gyros. Clean, friendly, outdoor and indoor seating, attention to health regs, all employees were wearing masks. Lots of parking.

    I'll be back to try kabobs, Shawarma and a salad or two. Though Crave Kabob is not in the same league as Skokie Grill so it may be a while until I return. The one thing Crave Kabob has over Skokie Grill is speed, low impact time wise Crave is the choice. I could see stopping on the way to Fresh Farms or Costco, just up the street. And it sure beats McD's just a few hundred feet to the South.

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    Seating area is about three times size shown.
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    Crave Kabob
    7240 Niles Center Road
    Skokie, IL 60077
    847-393-7111
    http://www.cravekabob.com

    Second location:
    Crave Kabob
    1521 W Madison St
    Chicago, IL 60607
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #2 - September 13th, 2020, 2:47 pm
    Post #2 - September 13th, 2020, 2:47 pm Post #2 - September 13th, 2020, 2:47 pm
    Looks decent enough. Thanks for posting, Gary. So close to my office. If I ever go back, CK will be on my short list.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #3 - September 13th, 2020, 8:06 pm
    Post #3 - September 13th, 2020, 8:06 pm Post #3 - September 13th, 2020, 8:06 pm
    I tried the new Crave Kabob this week as well. I ordered the large humus with chicken shawarma. Too my shock as Gary mentioned they would not add tahini or hot sauce to my order without charging me extra. The humus was very smooth although a little bland for my taste and chicken shawarma was decent and very fresh tasting.

    I would recommend trying the newly opened Jarasa Kabob in Skokie which opened a couple weeks ago on Dempster for similar food but in my opinion taste a little better than Crave Kabob.
  • Post #4 - September 13th, 2020, 8:36 pm
    Post #4 - September 13th, 2020, 8:36 pm Post #4 - September 13th, 2020, 8:36 pm
    Technically, Crave replaced the short lived and mediocre Su taquería el rey del taco which replaced the mediocre West of Edens. 8)
    Never order barbecue in a place that also serves quiche - Lewis Grizzard
  • Post #5 - September 14th, 2020, 10:00 am
    Post #5 - September 14th, 2020, 10:00 am Post #5 - September 14th, 2020, 10:00 am
    polster wrote:I would recommend trying the newly opened Jarasa Kabob in Skokie which opened a couple weeks ago on Dempster for similar food but in my opinion taste a little better than Crave Kabob.


    I'll add a few good words for Jarasa Kabob, which I tried about a week ago. I went for the Kufta kabob dinner, and it was reasonably priced and pretty good. I thought the sides that I chose were the stars of the meal, really good tabbouleh with a clear lemon flavor, and silky smooth hummus with fresly added olive oil. The garlic sauce really improved the Kufta, which I thought middle of the road in terms of seasoning. I will certainly return to try more of their menu.

    But what I cannot understand is how a small region of Skokie can support the number of restaurants in the same market niche ("Middle Eastern"). I can easily walk to Kabul House, Zad, Jarasa Kabob, Larsa's ( whose chicken kifta kabob is the house benchmark! ) and have a short drive to Skokie Grill and Pita Inn. I have a slightly longer drive to Libinais, which is admittedly excellent.

    I understand that there are differences between Assyrian, Israeli, Iranian, Lebanese, etc. But this still appears to me to be an over saturated market - I cannot figure out how all of these places can survive.
  • Post #6 - September 14th, 2020, 10:14 am
    Post #6 - September 14th, 2020, 10:14 am Post #6 - September 14th, 2020, 10:14 am
    rfleisch1 wrote:I understand that there are differences between Assyrian, Israeli, Iranian, Lebanese, etc. But this still appears to me to be an over saturated market - I cannot figure out how all of these places can survive.


    I had the same reaction several years ago about the area near my office downtown (roughly Sears Tower adjacent). We had BenjYehuda, I Dream of Falafel, Nesh, Roti, Naf Naf, Mezza all within a few blocks, and I'm probably missing one or two. Nearly all have survived. People like it.
  • Post #7 - September 14th, 2020, 10:19 am
    Post #7 - September 14th, 2020, 10:19 am Post #7 - September 14th, 2020, 10:19 am
    Of course the (daytime) population density downtown is (was) far, far greater than anywhere in Skokie.
  • Post #8 - September 14th, 2020, 10:54 am
    Post #8 - September 14th, 2020, 10:54 am Post #8 - September 14th, 2020, 10:54 am
    rfleisch1 wrote:
    polster wrote:I understand that there are differences between Assyrian, Israeli, Iranian, Lebanese, etc. But this still appears to me to be an over saturated market - I cannot figure out how all of these places can survive.


    I always wondered the same thing with Thai food on Western Avenue. The density of Thai restaurants on Western Avenue doesn't seem like they can support the customer base but somehow they are all surviving.
  • Post #9 - September 14th, 2020, 11:10 am
    Post #9 - September 14th, 2020, 11:10 am Post #9 - September 14th, 2020, 11:10 am
    Then again, this type of thinking would lead one to believe that the China Town restaurants couldn’t survive.
  • Post #10 - September 14th, 2020, 11:45 am
    Post #10 - September 14th, 2020, 11:45 am Post #10 - September 14th, 2020, 11:45 am
    Ethnic dining destinations have existed for over a century, so that's not puzzling, it's just that there doesn't seem to be an organic evolution occurring for certain trends. There's no "hot dog row" for example.
  • Post #11 - September 28th, 2020, 1:51 pm
    Post #11 - September 28th, 2020, 1:51 pm Post #11 - September 28th, 2020, 1:51 pm
    polster wrote:I would recommend trying the newly opened Jarasa Kabob in Skokie which opened a couple weeks ago on Dempster for similar food but in my opinion taste a little better than Crave Kabob.

    100% agreement from this corner. Went for lunch with the bride and Jarasa Kabob kicks Crave Kabob right in the baba. :) Similar food, similar ordering system, similar physical layout, quality, price, couple of steps above. Jarasa Kabob post coming in the next day or so.
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow

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