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Going to Fogo De Chao

Going to Fogo De Chao
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  • Going to Fogo De Chao

    Post #1 - August 18th, 2006, 12:12 am
    Post #1 - August 18th, 2006, 12:12 am Post #1 - August 18th, 2006, 12:12 am
    So what are the best things? Don't want to waste time on anything less than great.

    Thanking you all in advance.

    Barbara
  • Post #2 - August 18th, 2006, 6:18 am
    Post #2 - August 18th, 2006, 6:18 am Post #2 - August 18th, 2006, 6:18 am
    My feeling was that nothing in the meat department was actually all that great. Some of it fine, some of it just OK, none of it special. Ironically, the part of the meal that stands out is the--salad bar! (And I'm not a "salad bar person.") It's huger than you can imagine, filled with imaginative and/or well-executed produce-creations and foods from the sea.
  • Post #3 - August 18th, 2006, 7:07 am
    Post #3 - August 18th, 2006, 7:07 am Post #3 - August 18th, 2006, 7:07 am
    bryan wrote:Don't want to waste time on anything less than great.


    riddlemay wrote:Ironically, the part of the meal that stands out is the--salad bar! (And I'm not a "salad bar person.")


    riddlemay is dead-on here. If you dont' want to waste your time on anything less than "great", then I would say don't waste your time on FdC.

    The carved meats are fine, but nothing special in my book.

    The "salad" bar is by far the culinary highlight of the restaurant, but with it's meats, cheeses, and fish, I'd call it more of a buffet-salad-bar-hybrid.

    I would also recommend completely avoiding the starch side dishes that they put on the table.

    Best,
    Michael
  • Post #4 - August 18th, 2006, 7:13 am
    Post #4 - August 18th, 2006, 7:13 am Post #4 - August 18th, 2006, 7:13 am
    I have been there twice now (not by choice the second time), and completely agree with both riddlemay and eatchicago. My only dissent is I actually found the cheese puffs, fried polenta and plantains to be almost the highlight of the meal. Of course, filling up on those certainly doesn't justify the outrageous price, so try and withhold yourself to just a few of each so you can at least feel like you get your money's worth of meats.
    "My doctor told me to stop having intimate dinners for four. Unless there are three other people."

    -Orson Welles-
  • Post #5 - August 18th, 2006, 7:24 am
    Post #5 - August 18th, 2006, 7:24 am Post #5 - August 18th, 2006, 7:24 am
    My favorites are the Picanha and the small sausages. My husband likes the lamb and the beef ribs. Our feeling is that Fogo isn't as good as when it first opened - but maybe that's inevitable - you could say it's a victim of its own success. I've heard people suggest that going there for lunch is a good idea (cheaper, albeit fewer meat offerings) - followed, I'm sure, by a long digestive siesta!

    I think that any slip in quality has to do not with the quality of the meat, but in how well it's prepared, how many cuts are available each night, and in how often they circulate them. That said, I do think it's still the best of the local Brazillian churrascurias, and the drinks and the festive atmosphere make it a fun place, in my book.
  • Post #6 - August 18th, 2006, 7:50 am
    Post #6 - August 18th, 2006, 7:50 am Post #6 - August 18th, 2006, 7:50 am
    I agree with most of above....there is nothing even approaching great (or even above average) meat-wise here...
  • Post #7 - August 18th, 2006, 9:17 am
    Post #7 - August 18th, 2006, 9:17 am Post #7 - August 18th, 2006, 9:17 am
    What I don't understand about these Brazilian steakhouses is the cost. When I was travelling to the Salt Lake City/ Provo area every other month, we would stop in all the Brazilian steakhouse chains and they would run $18-22. The meat was pretty good, not great and the value was really good.

    The ones in Chicago run $40-45. I can't eat THAT much meat ...
  • Post #8 - August 18th, 2006, 9:59 am
    Post #8 - August 18th, 2006, 9:59 am Post #8 - August 18th, 2006, 9:59 am
    I think the sausages and ribs are pretty fine, but that alone does not justify the tariff. However, the amount of top-shelf smoked fish, Italian charcuterie, and hearts of palm and artichoke I consume might. This is clearly an expense-account or every once and a while thing, especially good for lunch and/or for large, diverse groups who can't decide. Also, if the elderly, uptight, or juvenile are involved, it's a buffet, so one can be eating within momemts of walking in the door. This is an often-overlooked but sometimes important fact. And FdC still makes among the best caipirinhas in town, which is faint praise indeed.

    Also, anyone thinking that 45 bucks for a soup-to-nuts meat fest in River North is outrageously expensive needs to check back in. No way you could come close to that in even the least (nonprime) of the "downtown" steakhouses. Ruth's Chris, Sullivan's, etc.
  • Post #9 - August 18th, 2006, 10:38 am
    Post #9 - August 18th, 2006, 10:38 am Post #9 - August 18th, 2006, 10:38 am
    jlawrence01 wrote:What I don't understand about these Brazilian steakhouses is the cost. When I was travelling to the Salt Lake City/ Provo area every other month, we would stop in all the Brazilian steakhouse chains and they would run $18-22. The meat was pretty good, not great and the value was really good.

    The ones in Chicago run $40-45. I can't eat THAT much meat ...


    Asado in Evanston is in the $25 - $30 range. Some have liked it. Some have not.

    I haven't been to Asado, but I enjoyed my one trip to Fogo. I wouldn't make it a habit at that price, but the food was fine. If you are a fan of meat, it's worth going at least once. And actually, even knowing that the sides are meant to keep you from eating more meat, I thought the plantains and the polenta were both really pretty good.
    Joe G.

    "Whatever may be wrong with the world, at least it has some good things to eat." -- Cowboy Jack Clement
  • Post #10 - August 18th, 2006, 10:41 am
    Post #10 - August 18th, 2006, 10:41 am Post #10 - August 18th, 2006, 10:41 am
    Jeff B is totally right. I went here on an expense-account with about 8 people, and I'm not sure I'd want to go under different circumstances. I found the meats to all be pretty good, nothing spectacular, but probably liked them more than the other posters. You should, however, try each one because the place is all about excess anyway-even if you are paying your own way. One of the more eloquent members of our party described it as "Fogo de Dump" on the way out. I sort of want to try that other Brazilian steakhouse now though, Brazazz, if only for those hilarious poster ads that Ozzie Guillen appears in with the zip-up sportshirt and skewer of beef.
  • Post #11 - August 18th, 2006, 11:02 am
    Post #11 - August 18th, 2006, 11:02 am Post #11 - August 18th, 2006, 11:02 am
    Trampas wrote:I sort of want to try that other Brazilian steakhouse now though, Brazazz, if only for those hilarious poster ads that Ozzie Guillen appears in with the zip-up sportshirt and skewer of beef.


    Those are pretty bad, but even worse... before Brazzazz opened, they had signage in the window announcing what was coming; I continually got a laugh out of one of the photos in the signs. It showed two people seated at a restaurant table in business attire, and the one guy was talking on his cell phone and holding up his finger to his dining companion, as in "just hold on, this phone call is much more important than paying attention to you." This photo was actually reproduced three or four times as the signs repeated around the corner of the building.

    This did not fill me with a sense that Brazzaz was a place I wanted to frequent, but it did make me chuckle.
    Joe G.

    "Whatever may be wrong with the world, at least it has some good things to eat." -- Cowboy Jack Clement
  • Post #12 - August 18th, 2006, 11:05 am
    Post #12 - August 18th, 2006, 11:05 am Post #12 - August 18th, 2006, 11:05 am
    i went to one of the newer competitor's... sal y carvao. i had a good time, it ended up being quite expensive, but that was partly due to the wine (good extensive wine list) and before/after dinner drinks... if i had a choice, i'd prefer to just get one really well prepared piece of meat along with the other goodies i had there, but if that were the case it wouldnt' be a brazillian steakhouse ;p .


    one of the main reasons we picked this place was it seemed very atkins friendly for my dining companion ...(unlimited meats, it doesn't get much better for someone on atkins).

    i really enjoyed the service, though.

    btw, found this article from metromix that compares the two if you're interested ... basically they don't find much of a difference... http://metromix.chicagotribune.com/dini ... 7564.story

    if you go during lunch its a lot cheaper (close to half the price? not to mention you'll be less tempted to spend $200 on drinks at lunch time)... i'd go again for lunch but maybe not dinner.
  • Post #13 - August 18th, 2006, 1:06 pm
    Post #13 - August 18th, 2006, 1:06 pm Post #13 - August 18th, 2006, 1:06 pm
    I didn't think Fogo was that bad. Not somewhere I'd go every week, but not a bad place to have a Festivus of meat. The only complaint I have is that they use so much salt when cooking most of the meat that I actually felt hungover the next day. Yes, it was my first meat-hangover.
    -Josh

    I've started blogging about the Stuff I Eat
  • Post #14 - August 18th, 2006, 3:01 pm
    Post #14 - August 18th, 2006, 3:01 pm Post #14 - August 18th, 2006, 3:01 pm
    There is so much to try at these restaurants that it can be mind and taste numbing.
    And how bad can meat grilled on swords over charcoal, even oversalted, be. Imagine Johnny's Italian sausage times 20. To grouse about the meat is un-American, certainly un-Chicagoan!
    I do like the salad bar stuff and always have some smoked salmon, but remember why you are there. If you want a great salad bar, order just that and save yourself some money.
    I find that mixing all the meats is not satisfying after your first trip. Focus on one or two types. While I like the chicken and sausage and to some extent the pork, my advice is to stick to the higher end meat.
    My favorite, and what I would say is among "the best things," is the lamb. The leg of lamb allows you to pick the doneness and area of the leg you like-my favorite being what the French call the "souris"(sp?), the slightly bulbous piece along the leg bone.
    But my favorite item is the lamb chops. The first time they come out they will probably be overdone. Ask the server for some rare or rarer ones the next time-they'll be back-drink some malbec or another caipirinha (definitely a must have). Last time I was at Sal y Carvao, I had almost exclusively lamb.
    Your asking about what are the best things to have is not an unwise approach-it is very easy to leave the green coaster up and miss items you might have wished you left room for.
  • Post #15 - August 21st, 2006, 4:06 pm
    Post #15 - August 21st, 2006, 4:06 pm Post #15 - August 21st, 2006, 4:06 pm
    The best of the meat dishes I've had at Fogo de Chão is the parmesan crusted pork loin. I'm also a big fan of the sausage. Sadly, Fogo de Chão does not serve chicken hearts, my favorite churrasco treat.

    The pão de queijo (cheese puffs) are just as good as any I have eaten in Brazil, and the polenta is addictive. It is difficult not to fill up completely on these starches.

    For a more authentic experience, ask for a side of farofa (manioc flour fried with salt, spices, and some meat) to sprinkle on or dip your meats into. When you ask for farofa, your server may offer some additional traditional Brazilian sides, like arroz e feijão (rice and beans).

    Don't forget one or several more caipirinhas, or if you don't like cachaça, a caipiroska (vodka) or a caipiríssima (rum).
  • Post #16 - August 21st, 2006, 10:29 pm
    Post #16 - August 21st, 2006, 10:29 pm Post #16 - August 21st, 2006, 10:29 pm
    For those who are unsatisfied with the quality of the meats, you must understand that, in Brazil, the Riodizio is a rather common form of eating.

    Brazil is not a wealthy country. Nor are many Brazilians wealthy.The meat slections represent what those who live in central and southern Brazil consider "soul food". As a matter of fact, it is so common, that I find myself getting bored with southern Brazilian Food during the second week of my trips down. During those visits, I see a constant parade of beef and grilled meats nearly everywhere I go.

    In both place like Rio, Sao Paulo, and Porto Allegre (where Fogo originated), you'll find Churrascarias at various price points, some (the least expensive) offering a choice of only four or five meats for a price of somewhere around $5 to $7 US. One of my favorites in Rio is right at that price point during lunch.

    I think that Fogo gives a good representation of what one might find at a typical upscale churrascaria in one of Brazil's major cities right down to the stroganoffs that you find adorning the salad bar. I think that, Fogo has incredible overhead both for the leasehold improvements that go into their restaurants as well as the fact that they train the gauchos and cooks in Brazil and bring them to the US to serve. That's what you pay for at Fogo.

    But, let's not pooh pooh Fogo for not serving American steakhouse quality fare. It ain't Gibsons. But, it ain't trying to be Gibsons.
  • Post #17 - August 22nd, 2006, 7:19 am
    Post #17 - August 22nd, 2006, 7:19 am Post #17 - August 22nd, 2006, 7:19 am
    eatchicago wrote:I would also recommend completely avoiding the starch side dishes that they put on the table.

    Michael,

    Oh, I don't know about that, at least as it concerns the crisp fried polenta sticks. Hot, crisp, crunchy, nicely dusted with parmesan cheese, these little corn bombs are quite addictive. Fried bananas are good, but certainly can be missed, but I do love the little polenta sticks.

    Far as meat recommendations go for Bryan, I like the Costela (beef ribs), Linguica (sausage) , Alcatra (top sirloin) and Corderio (lamb), but you really should try anything that you find visually appealing. It's a little like dim sum in that you can take a look at the item before making a decision. My absolute can't miss items are the smoked salmon and Belgian endive on the salad bar, though the endive was missing my last time there, crisp polenta sticks and the Costela, be sure to ask for a rib.

    Fogo is a fun place, as has been said, good with a mixed group or those who wish to get right into the business of eating. I always have a nice time when I go, usually with a group where someone else chose the restaurant, but it's not necessarily someplace I'd suggest.

    The only slight problem I have with Fogo is cost, no, not the $48 or so dollars for the meal, but total cost. By the time one has a few drinks, shares a bottle of wine and a dessert, tax, tip, it's typically within spiting distance of $100, which, if one is in the mood for meat, could be put to better use at Morton's, David Burke, Gene & Georgetti's etc.

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #18 - August 22nd, 2006, 8:45 pm
    Post #18 - August 22nd, 2006, 8:45 pm Post #18 - August 22nd, 2006, 8:45 pm
    G Wiv wrote:
    eatchicago wrote:I would also recommend completely avoiding the starch side dishes that they put on the table.

    Michael,

    Oh, I don't know about that, at least as it concerns the crisp fried polenta sticks. Hot, crisp, crunchy, nicely dusted with parmesan cheese, these little corn bombs are quite addictive. Fried bananas are good, but certainly can be missed, but I do love the little polenta sticks.

    Enjoy,
    Gary


    Ha! I'm with Gary :)

    I know they're there to fill ya up, but I almost enjoy the sides more than the meats. I especially like the cheese bread, and will eat them even when I am bursting. I also think the Brazilian places do a great job with fried bananas, very mushy-good.

    On price, I'd note that Brazzzzzzzzzz has a lunch special for about 1/2 price (and Fogo has a goood lunch deal as well). You lose only a bit on the salad bar, but overall, lunch is the time to go.

    Rob
    Think Yiddish, Dress British - Advice of Evil Ronnie to me.
  • Post #19 - August 22nd, 2006, 10:02 pm
    Post #19 - August 22nd, 2006, 10:02 pm Post #19 - August 22nd, 2006, 10:02 pm
    Went to Fogo De Chao. This report comes after a day of digestion and rest. Which you will sorely need after this place.

    Firstly, wow, what a beautiful room. Very modern. Cool lighting fixtures and the waterfall against the south wall was lovely. The salad bar was a thing of beauty. Actually makes me wish more restaurants would bring this old dinasaur back - if they would bring it back in this manner. The choices were amazing but I stuck to the advice of not filling up on it. I had some very fresh greens and two slices of beefsteak tomato, and an artichoke heart, a piece of smoked salmon w/ a very nice creamy basil sauce. But the variety was astounding and I could see how you could overdo this easily.

    Secondly, I've rarely experienced service both so excellent, yet so frenzied. When you turned your little coaster over to the "yes, bring me meat" green, they just kept-a-comin'. Many of the gauchos (darling outfits - who knew Brazilian cowboys were gay? Ang Lee should make a movie) seemed terribly disappointed when you refused anything. Amusing, but slightly off-putting. But the other waiters, wearing regulation black and white, were most helpful. They would ask if you cared for a particular cut, and shortly the gaucho would bring it to you.

    Thirdly, the meat, the meat and more meat. I counted about 14? different choices. I tried the following: Picanha - prime sirloin, quite good; Filet Mignon, asked for rare, got medium -eh; Alcatra - top sirloin, this was my favorite, extremely tender and flavorfull and dead on rare as I like my beef; Corderio - leg of lamb, I like salt, but wow, this was way too salty.

    My sister tried the Linguica - pork sausage, said they were nothing to right home about; Frango - chicken breasts in bacon, said they were boring, also chicken legs, said they were dry. She described the beef ribs as "like brisket, but not in a good way". She too prefered the Pichanha and the Alcatra the best. My friend tried many of the pork offerings, his favorite being the lomba which was pork loin sprinkled w/ parmesan. He also found the lamb too salty.

    We were given rice; black beans; mashed potatoes w/ cheese, bacon and scallion; fried bananas; fried polenta sticks sprinkled w/ parmesan; chimchurri sauce and the falofal? A mix of stuff I found a little dull and the the very delicious cheesey popover-like rolls. I liked the polenta, the mashers and the popovers the best. The chimchurri was described as "spicy" - apparently someone w/ extra senstive taste buds gave it that description - I've had spicier mild salsa.

    To drink: caipirinhas, red wine, and when I saw someone having a coke in a little bottle I ordered one to sadly discover it wasn't a cane sugar coke. Boo.

    We were comped a flan, which I had one bite of - "it's wafer thin", and made my way home. Good, but GWiv has it right, as usual. Were I to spend that kind of money (which, thankfully, I did not, I was a guest), I would go to an upper end steak house. Although that salad bar would make a very, very respectable meal.

    Thank you all for your help. Hope this report was helpful too.
  • Post #20 - May 17th, 2007, 8:28 am
    Post #20 - May 17th, 2007, 8:28 am Post #20 - May 17th, 2007, 8:28 am
    Some visitors from DC wanted to try Brazzaz last night and I thought I would warn you all about the salt levels..........I love my salt....feta, olives, capers...bring it on! But the salty rump roasts and skewers of chicken wings and sausages had me swigging agua like I'd just run a marathon!

    Everyone agreed the meat was nice and tender but WAY too salty. The handsome gauchos swirled in with more chicken, sausages and garlic steak than any human could possibly consume. The beef and pork ribs made it to the table once.

    In all fairness.....the salad bar was a delight.......they even had oysters on the halfshell. The best part of the meal? The Caipirinha!
  • Post #21 - May 17th, 2007, 9:18 am
    Post #21 - May 17th, 2007, 9:18 am Post #21 - May 17th, 2007, 9:18 am
    I get a kick out of the fact that the belgian endive has been singled out for praise. At Fogo, we call the endive "stomach wipes" - the internal moist towelettes for the gut. You can always fit that last extra bit of fatty garlic steak in if you have a few cleansing leaves to follow.

    I rank Brazzaz highest, followed by Fogo, followed by Sal.
  • Post #22 - May 17th, 2007, 10:10 am
    Post #22 - May 17th, 2007, 10:10 am Post #22 - May 17th, 2007, 10:10 am
    funghi wrote:Everyone agreed the meat was nice and tender but WAY too salty.
    Agreed. We had the same experience last summer. There's a reason why Brazzaz always has coupons - it's just not that good to warrant the full price. The sides and salad bar are not as good as FdC. We won't be returning.
  • Post #23 - July 25th, 2009, 11:37 am
    Post #23 - July 25th, 2009, 11:37 am Post #23 - July 25th, 2009, 11:37 am
    LTH,

    Haven't been to Fogo in a while, but came across these pics. My favorite bite at Fogo is the crispy, salty, fatty, meaty beef ribs.

    Fogo de Chao Beef Ribs

    Image
    Image

    As the boneless section of beef rib was moving toward my plate words to the effect of "gimme dat bone" were already out of my mouth.

    Nicely rare Top Sirloin

    Image

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #24 - July 25th, 2009, 2:46 pm
    Post #24 - July 25th, 2009, 2:46 pm Post #24 - July 25th, 2009, 2:46 pm
    G Wiv wrote: The only slight problem I have with Fogo is cost, no, not the $48 or so dollars for the meal, but total cost. By the time one has a few drinks, shares a bottle of wine and a dessert, tax, tip, it's typically within spiting distance of $100, which, if one is in the mood for meat, could be put to better use at Morton's, David Burke, Gene & Georgetti's etc.

    Enjoy,
    Gary



    I humbly disagree. I would much rather spend $100 bucks at Fogo than at a "classic" steakhouse. More variety, no need to choose between a cut of meat, and most importantly hard-core salad/antipasta bar and side dishes other than spinach dumped into cream, steamed asparagus and other crap that the I've had better renditions of in hospital cafeterias. Maybe I haven't eaten at the best steakhouses in the city, but compared to where I have eaten (Gibsons, Chicago Chop House, Sullivans, Capital Grille) Fogo blows them away.
    "By the fig, the olive..." Surat Al-Teen, Mecca 95:1"
  • Post #25 - July 25th, 2009, 4:20 pm
    Post #25 - July 25th, 2009, 4:20 pm Post #25 - July 25th, 2009, 4:20 pm
    Habibi wrote:I humbly disagree.

    Habibi,

    Don't get me wrong, I like Fogo, but on a once a year or less basis. The problem, at least in comparison to a top tier steak house such as David Burke's Primehouse, is meat quality and salt buildup. Fogo uses good quality meat, I'd guess upper end choice, but when I am spending $100 per person for meat in a restaurant'd rather have top of the line dry age prime beef. My other 'problem' with Fogo's meat is it is very salty, though I admittedly have a low tolerance for salt, and by the end of the meal I'm feeling like a side of salmon being cured for lox.

    Yes, Fogo is fun, the salad bar terrific, drinks are good, if a little expensive, the joint jumps and service is smooth as silk stockings. All in all if left to my own devices I would rather be dining at Primehouse than Fogo.

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #26 - July 25th, 2009, 6:43 pm
    Post #26 - July 25th, 2009, 6:43 pm Post #26 - July 25th, 2009, 6:43 pm
    I suspect the salt is a business decision. Honestly, I've never been to Fogo, but I have been to Texas de Brazil many times. I suspect their business model is the same. The drinks are way over priced. The high salt makes you want to drink more. Kind of like free pretzels at a bar. It's the only place I ever just order water with my meal.
  • Post #27 - July 25th, 2009, 6:44 pm
    Post #27 - July 25th, 2009, 6:44 pm Post #27 - July 25th, 2009, 6:44 pm
    Habibi wrote:
    G Wiv wrote: The only slight problem I have with Fogo is cost, no, not the $48 or so dollars for the meal, but total cost. By the time one has a few drinks, shares a bottle of wine and a dessert, tax, tip, it's typically within spiting distance of $100, which, if one is in the mood for meat, could be put to better use at Morton's, David Burke, Gene & Georgetti's etc.

    Enjoy,
    Gary



    I humbly disagree. I would much rather spend $100 bucks at Fogo than at a "classic" steakhouse. More variety, no need to choose between a cut of meat, and most importantly hard-core salad/antipasta bar and side dishes other than spinach dumped into cream, steamed asparagus and other crap that the I've had better renditions of in hospital cafeterias. Maybe I haven't eaten at the best steakhouses in the city, but compared to where I have eaten (Gibsons, Chicago Chop House, Sullivans, Capital Grille) Fogo blows them away.


    I'm with Habibi. Also:

    The best Fogo de Chao dinner I've had was the bistecca alla fiorentina at Mado.
  • Post #28 - July 26th, 2009, 7:09 am
    Post #28 - July 26th, 2009, 7:09 am Post #28 - July 26th, 2009, 7:09 am
    I like Fogo de Chao for all the reasons everybody likes it, which is why we go once a year (around the holidays--not the high ones), but the meat itself has seldom sent me into paroxysms of delight. The variety is wonderful, the whole concept makes for a fun evening, and everything is good enough (in my opinion) to justify the price tag, but if you were to strip away everything and just blindfold me in a quiet room with some Fogo meat on my plate and a knife and fork, none of it would rise to the level of "best I ever had" or even close. I'm always slightly disappointed by the actual meat at Fogo--the reality always underdelivers on the orgasmic promise of all-the-meat-in-the-world--although not enough to put me off my feed.

    As for salt levels, the saltiness could be purpose-built (as midas suspects) to make you order more drinks, but I always suspect a simpler reason at any restaurant saltiness happens, which is that whoever was responsible knew the food wouldn't taste like much (or might even taste bad) without it.
  • Post #29 - August 3rd, 2009, 3:09 pm
    Post #29 - August 3rd, 2009, 3:09 pm Post #29 - August 3rd, 2009, 3:09 pm
    went here again for my birthday on Saturday. Good as always :)

    they even made me a birthday flan!

    Image
  • Post #30 - August 3rd, 2009, 3:40 pm
    Post #30 - August 3rd, 2009, 3:40 pm Post #30 - August 3rd, 2009, 3:40 pm
    I haven't been to Fogo de Chao in a few years. But my recollection is that the lunch is about half the price of the dinner, and the only difference between the two is that the salmon platter is only available at dinner. Things could be different now, of course.

    I liked going for lunch, in any case, because it gave me many more hours to digest before going to bed.

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