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All Inclusives, that *really* have good food?

All Inclusives, that *really* have good food?
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  • All Inclusives, that *really* have good food?

    Post #1 - November 17th, 2008, 4:14 pm
    Post #1 - November 17th, 2008, 4:14 pm Post #1 - November 17th, 2008, 4:14 pm
    All Inclusives, that *really* have good food? Does such a thing exist? or are many of these Tripadvisor people just crazy?

    It's totally not my type of travel, and I'm guessing many people here as well. I'd much rather pay 1/3 the price for lodging and dine as I choose... be able to go to a hole in the wall, etc... so I'm generally opposed to it. But I was recently forced to stay at one in Cozumel due to a wedding... The Cozumel Palace. (The "Palace" resort chain operates a few others--in cancun I believe as well as Playa, and i think on the other coast as well). It was supposed to have been "the best" all inclusive resort in the entire area, and was priced accordingly ($300/night--and that was a large group deal, other places are half in the area). More troubling is Tripadvisor ranked it one of the top 10 luxury resorts in latin america, top 10 travelers choice, top 100 luxury resorts in the world, etc. ... list last year (again, and has in the past as well).

    The resort wasn't that great overall (good service, lacking facilities), but the food.... the food is what I came for.
    And the food was so bad that I feel worthy of doing an anti-PSA against it...

    food... just terrible. the restaurants were only open at night, during the day it was buffet food or a grill. the grill's menu consisted of no mexican food, but rather cheeseburgers and hot dogs. the room service food was OK if you ordered the right things, but a lot of things were severely bad. Many of the entrees came with a side of chips and guacamole. The chips they served were so stale they were almost indedible.

    We made it into one of the two "upscale" restaurants they had... The "Mexican" restaurant had food that was on par with Chi Chi's (not joking)... This is disappointing, given that many people had told me the chef tries to do upscale Mexican preperations, etc... We have much better mexican here in chicago... how can you get bad mexican food in Mexico??? Not sure. I ordered chicken mole, which came out as some sort of lemon pepper sauce chicken, and the chicken wasn't bone in, but rather boneless chicken breast. they didn't have corn tortillas, only flour. We asked for corn tortillas (in Spanish), and they brought us more flour. The buffet did have corn tortillas if you asked them for them. The only other table in the restaurant was a group of really midwestern looking people and they were ooooohing and awwwing and taking pictures at the dessert stand the restaurant came and set up tableside to make their banana's foster. how unexciting! :] we didn't get to try their other restaurant ("The Oriental" restaurant as they call it), but others told us it wasn't very good. There's also an Italian restaurant at night but that's not intended to be upscale, it's all buffet I think.

    we were told the food would be "anything you want" and "top shelf" ... which just wasn't true, no lobster/crab or any seafood other than white fish to be found... tanqueray was the only close to top shelf liquor i found. the wines were all a Mexican house wine they had. The ingredients of everything else were not chosen with much care other than their cost.

    I went with fairly low expectations, but Tripadvisor ranks it fairly decently so I held out hope... This isn't the first time I've totally disagreed with many Tripadvisor reviews, but I have to think that many people on tripadvisor either A) spend so much money they're afraid to complain or B) don't get out enough, apparently.

    ...Has anyone ever stayed at Ceiba Del Mar in Puerto Morelos? I didn't stay there, but last time I was in Puerto Morelos we stopped in to their restaurant and paid for food. And it was actually pretty good. I had a very French prepared salt-encrusted fish that was taken apart tableside
  • Post #2 - November 17th, 2008, 5:00 pm
    Post #2 - November 17th, 2008, 5:00 pm Post #2 - November 17th, 2008, 5:00 pm
    We had a similiar experience at the Iberostar Bavaro in Punta Cana, Dominican Republic. The food was pretty awful with the exception of a massive Paella that they sometimes made on the beach during the day. All of the upscale options with upcharges to match were just as bad. Unfortunately, in the DR you are pretty much stuck in your hotel.

    Several years ago I stayed at the Ritz Carlton Rose Hall in Montego Bay, Jamaica which isnt exclusively all inclusive. The food was very good. We had a meal package and it was worth the extra price.

    One exception might be cruise ships. We had pretty good food on the Zuiderdam, a Holland America ship, not exactly fine dining but some of the dinners were very well put together. I have heard that the Crystal line has very nice food. I have also heard that the food on Carnival and other less upscale lines is glorified gruel.
  • Post #3 - November 17th, 2008, 5:01 pm
    Post #3 - November 17th, 2008, 5:01 pm Post #3 - November 17th, 2008, 5:01 pm
    I tried an all-inclusive south of Playa del Carmen (because the conference was there) and the food was horrible... seriously horrible... I was tempted to catch fish that were schooling in the lagoon, just go off resort by a few feet and roast my own fish... it was that bad...
  • Post #4 - November 17th, 2008, 5:23 pm
    Post #4 - November 17th, 2008, 5:23 pm Post #4 - November 17th, 2008, 5:23 pm
    Mike and I go to Cozumel every year. Even though he has options at the Palace family of all-inclusives, we always get our own accomodations. The first year we rented a condo and shopped at the nearby supermarket.

    In my opinion, Cozumel has some stellar restaurants and at reasonable prices which makes all-inclusives more expensive in our books!

    I generally think all inclusives are good for non-adventurous eaters, or people with weaker stomachs!
  • Post #5 - November 17th, 2008, 9:27 pm
    Post #5 - November 17th, 2008, 9:27 pm Post #5 - November 17th, 2008, 9:27 pm
    dddane wrote:All Inclusives, that *really* have good food? Does such a thing exist? or are many of these Tripadvisor people just crazy?


    Your experience reminds me of my one and only cruise ten or fifteen years ago.

    The food was pretty decent - reminded me of a first rate college cafeteria. Generally, that would be "good enough." However, when the cruise line advertises "Cruising Italian Style" and the pasta is overcooked and much of the food is uninspired, it is pretty depressing, especially at the price.

    I want nothing to do with another trip where all the meals are included.
  • Post #6 - November 17th, 2008, 9:35 pm
    Post #6 - November 17th, 2008, 9:35 pm Post #6 - November 17th, 2008, 9:35 pm
    I think the TripAdvisor reviews are a valuable reminder of what passes for "good food" with most people.
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  • Post #7 - November 17th, 2008, 10:20 pm
    Post #7 - November 17th, 2008, 10:20 pm Post #7 - November 17th, 2008, 10:20 pm
    This is probably not going to help you, but some of the best all-inclusive food I've had has been at:

    http://www.konavillage.com/ (Big Island, Hawaii)

    http://www.pearlresorts.com/raiateahawa ... l/main.php (Tahiti)

    http://www.paraisodelabonita.com/ (Mayan Riviera)

    The problem: the average room night at these three places is about $800, and the only way I was able to stay at any is because I was setting up contracts for an event planning company.

    Foodies are much better off doing Puerto Vallarta on your own (see many posts in "Beyond Chicagoland") or Aruba, which has a dine-around program at the various island steakhouses. A good balance between a la carte and all-inclusive is a partial mealplan at a really good resort. Gourmets I worked with liked:

    http://www.lacasaquecanta.com/ (Zihuatanejo)

    http://www.oneandonlyresorts.com/flash.html (navigate through to Palmilla, Los Cabos, though Los Cabos bores me out of my mind)

    http://www.tikaye.com/ (St. Lucia)

    If you can stomach a split between a more social resort in your big coast city and then a totally-captive all-inclusive way back from civilization, former clients raved about these two in Mexico (just not for the only stop on your trip, or you might get cabin fever)

    http://www.verana.com/ (downcoast from PV)

    http://www.hotelito.com/ (inland from PV)

    Finally, I have to plug Trinidad since I was blown away last year. There are fantastic Indo-Caribbean (Indo as in curry, mon) mealplans (in very rustic surroundings, at the end of broken roads on an island with terrible inland infrastructure) at:

    http://www.asawright.org/

    http://www.acajoutrinidad.com/

    I still dream about the fresh-baked bread, scotch bonnet salsa, dhal, and ginger-garlic-squash soup at Asa Wright. Every single thing there is made from as scratch as you can imagine (like, things pulled off trees or dug up from the ground on premises). Not fancy, just good.

    Again, not true all-inclusives with activities and booze (though Asa Wright includes birding hikes and rum punch), but just a list of accessible places that either I or foodie clients have really liked as food destinations as much as culture / relaxation.

    If anyone here knows of a true gourmet all-inclusive (like one of the Dorados, Barcelos, or Rius, which occasionally bubble up in lists like this) based on recent personal experience, I'd love to hear about it.
  • Post #8 - November 20th, 2008, 10:59 am
    Post #8 - November 20th, 2008, 10:59 am Post #8 - November 20th, 2008, 10:59 am
    Interesting topic in that I am booked at Excellence Rivera Cancun (Actually in Puerto Moreles) for Christmas week.

    The reviews on Trip Advisor were an influencing factor as well as a couple we know who stayed there during the summer and, knowing we are "foodies" told us we would LOVE the food!

    We'll see...

    http://www.excellence-resorts.com/all-inclusive-resorts/riviera-cancun-mexico/cancun-overview.htm
    "Your custard pie, yeah, sweet and nice
    When you cut it, mama, save me a slice"
  • Post #9 - November 20th, 2008, 12:39 pm
    Post #9 - November 20th, 2008, 12:39 pm Post #9 - November 20th, 2008, 12:39 pm
    This place has great food, great service, great rooms, etc.

    As an added bonus, there are trails where you can walk to here and enjoy some reciprocal priveleges.

    I would add that the entire area (North Sound) has a number of fabulous resorts, including what many people consider the world's greatest resort.
  • Post #10 - November 20th, 2008, 2:00 pm
    Post #10 - November 20th, 2008, 2:00 pm Post #10 - November 20th, 2008, 2:00 pm
    DMChicago wrote:Interesting topic in that I am booked at Excellence Rivera Cancun (Actually in Puerto Moreles) for Christmas week.

    The reviews on Trip Advisor were an influencing factor as well as a couple we know who stayed there during the summer and, knowing we are "foodies" told us we would LOVE the food!

    We'll see...

    http://www.excellence-resorts.com/all-inclusive-resorts/riviera-cancun-mexico/cancun-overview.htm


    I stayed there on my honeymoon at this time last year. I thought it was average to above average food. Nothing that will knock your socks off, but certainly not offensive or repulsive. The Mexican restaurant was probably my least favorite and the Japanese the best. The buffets for breakfast and lunch were good. They had a mixture of local specialties (chilaquiles, nopales, cochanita pibil) along with American. They would cook eggs any style or omlettes fresh for you if you didn't want the pre-made buffet eggs.

    One of the plusses was the stocking of the mini-fridge every day with cans of Mexican Coke, Sprite and Snickers. I brought back about a 6 pack of Mexican soda.

    They had shuttles that would take you into Puerto Morelos if you wanted to go. We chose not to, because our Spanish is non-existent and just didn't feel comfortable not being able to talk or understand people.

    All in all that is a great resort. The entertainment staff is awesome. Some of the shows at night are a little cheesy, but I had a great time. I would definitely recommend it.
  • Post #11 - November 20th, 2008, 2:47 pm
    Post #11 - November 20th, 2008, 2:47 pm Post #11 - November 20th, 2008, 2:47 pm
    This might be outdated information (as the company has changed drastically over the past decade), but about 10 years ago I stayed at a Club Med in the Bahamas. The food was very good at the high points and merely "good" at the low points.

    There was a staff bread baker who had a presentation every evening at dinner of at least 10 or 12 different excellent freshly baked breads.

    There was one night where dinner was grilled swordfish steaks, cut to order directly from the whole swordfish (which was caught that day) laying on ice right before you at the buffet. I wish I had a photo of it. It was quite a sight.

    There were quite a few other meals that I enjoyed that week, but the bread was certainly the standout for me.

    Best,
    Michael
  • Post #12 - November 20th, 2008, 4:17 pm
    Post #12 - November 20th, 2008, 4:17 pm Post #12 - November 20th, 2008, 4:17 pm
    I have to respond to the poster who called Carnival food gruel...
    About a year ago, I took a week long Carribean cruise with a group of 10 teenage girl scouts and moms
    on a larger ship(blanking on which one).
    While I will easily admit the buffet offerings were nothing special,
    The sit down dinners served in the dining rooms were surprisingly good.
    We chose Carnival primarily for price, so I wasn't expecting much, and I was very pleasantly surprised.
    Food was carefully prepared, beautifully plated, perfectly seasoned,
    and cooked as ordered ,(no small thing to get medium rare when you order it IMHO)
    IF you wanted to try both apps all you had to do was ask...
    Servers could not have been more gracious,
    and everything was delicious, with many of the entrees being what I would consider to be fairly "upscale"
    I was really surprised, because I really wasn't expecting much.
    Maybe it just goes to show that you can have different experiences in different places at different times...
    "If you reject the food, ignore the customs, fear the religion and avoid the people, you might better stay home."
    ~James Michener
  • Post #13 - November 21st, 2008, 8:37 am
    Post #13 - November 21st, 2008, 8:37 am Post #13 - November 21st, 2008, 8:37 am
    the wimperoo wrote: I thought it was average to above average food. Nothing that will knock your socks off, but certainly not offensive or repulsive.



    These are my expectations going in...
    "Your custard pie, yeah, sweet and nice
    When you cut it, mama, save me a slice"
  • Post #14 - December 29th, 2008, 8:55 am
    Post #14 - December 29th, 2008, 8:55 am Post #14 - December 29th, 2008, 8:55 am
    DMChicago wrote:
    the wimperoo wrote: I thought it was average to above average food. Nothing that will knock your socks off, but certainly not offensive or repulsive.



    These are my expectations going in...



    Well, my expectations were almost met. The food is average at best. A few items that are good to very good but most dishes are overcooked and under seasoned. The menu descriptions sound great but the execution just doesn't match. On the plus side, decent cognac was available. A glass of cognac can round out a good meal but it takes two or three to dull the memory of a bad one...
    "Your custard pie, yeah, sweet and nice
    When you cut it, mama, save me a slice"
  • Post #15 - February 13th, 2024, 2:46 pm
    Post #15 - February 13th, 2024, 2:46 pm Post #15 - February 13th, 2024, 2:46 pm
    I'm at Excellence Punta Cana this week, also based on reviews that its food is better.

    From what I we've seen in 24 hours, no up charges (other than Valentine's packages). Unlike a similar-sized Jamaican resort a few years back, lots of local seafood including lobster. The only restaurant that needs a reservation is the (singular) teppanyaki table at their pan-Asian restaurant, Spice. We are there last night and the food was very good: dragon roll, shrimp nem (Vietnamese summer roll), kung pao shrimp, and grouper spicy basil. The only complaint is that while the fish was beautifully cooked, it was neither spicy nor basil but for a single tiny leaf. Other things have been spicy though. Breakfast and lunch buffets have a lot of variety (smoked salmon had a very sweet cure). Going to try French tonight, I think, although that has a no-shorts dress code.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #16 - February 13th, 2024, 4:00 pm
    Post #16 - February 13th, 2024, 4:00 pm Post #16 - February 13th, 2024, 4:00 pm
    Years ago Marriott would grant "all-inclusive" benefits for a daily upcharge per person at certain locations. We got wristbands and could go to any restaurant on the premises and order food/drinks poolside. Since everyone else was paying ala carte and their restaurants had to be competitive the food was pretty good. No idea if it's still an option, we ran it through their guest services office.
  • Post #17 - February 14th, 2024, 6:11 pm
    Post #17 - February 14th, 2024, 6:11 pm Post #17 - February 14th, 2024, 6:11 pm
    More from Excellence Punta Cana.

    The past two nights have been better: their French place served a very good bouillabaisse and scallops, a little less pleased with the French onion soup (onions undercooked). Tonight lobster tails at Lobster House were excellent, lobster bisque and Crab Cake very good, grilled octopus a little bland.

    If there's a fatal trend, it's a seeming lack of garlic. Tacos at lunch were seasoned well but I'd expect garlic flavor. It was light on the kung pao the other night too.

    I'll keep updating.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #18 - February 19th, 2024, 7:42 pm
    Post #18 - February 19th, 2024, 7:42 pm Post #18 - February 19th, 2024, 7:42 pm
    All in all, Excellence Punta Cana's food was pretty good. Not destination dining, but everything enjoyable. They need a heavier hand with garlic and chilis, but we didn't get bored.

    I do like that All-Ins, like cruises, serve relatively small portions, meaning that you can order an app or two, soup or salad, main, and desert without feeling too indulgent (the guy at the adjacent table at The Lobster House ordered just a lobster dish (a tail), then ordered another). The exception was at The Grill (their steakhouse): the Argentinian Mixed Grill should have been labeled as for multiple people, as it had a modest sized steak, a similar stature pork chop, and airline chicken breast, and a sausage.

    High points were that they had no upcharges except for better wines or special events (Valentine's Day romantic dinner), no dinner buffet except for their Monday Dominican feast, no reservations needed except for the singular teppanyaki table.

    I drank a lot more than I normally do... which meant 1-2 per day instead of per month (wine or a cocktail at dinner, a frozen drink by the pool). I'm probably not getting my value out of All-Ins because of that.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #19 - February 21st, 2024, 2:05 pm
    Post #19 - February 21st, 2024, 2:05 pm Post #19 - February 21st, 2024, 2:05 pm
    JoelF wrote:
    I drank a lot more than I normally do... which meant 1-2 per day instead of per month (wine or a cocktail at dinner, a frozen drink by the pool). I'm probably not getting my value out of All-Ins because of that.


    We were recently at the Royalton Riveria in Cancun. 10 families: 26 boys in the group 21-28 as well as 6 girls in the same age group plus the parents and other assorted friends. I think we had about 60 people total. We were there January 11-January 18 and watched the NFL playoffs for three days in the sports bar. On Monday January 15, lets just say our group ate the sports bar out of chicken wings, fireball, patron, and modelo. We had to go to another bar in the complex to finish the games that day.

    The food was decent to good at this place. Nothing real adventurous was served there.
    I am sure they lost money on us just on booze alone. The kids ate and drank all day and all nite each day we were there. I think room service, bar service, or the wait staff near our swim up rooms delivered booze and food around the clock. The kids rooms had several bottles of Rum chata, fireball, Jack Fire, and patron/don julio along several cases of modelo delivered at 9am, 3pm, and 11pm every day. This along with the vodka, coke, club soda, pizzas, chicken stips and burgers.

    We pretty much had standing reservations each nite at the Steakhouse or Carribean Seafood Grill due to the size and participation level of our group. Again the young men did not disappoint. My 3 sons ate every meal at the steakhouse and at every dinner each ordered a ribeye, a strip, and 2 lobster tails.
  • Post #20 - February 21st, 2024, 3:19 pm
    Post #20 - February 21st, 2024, 3:19 pm Post #20 - February 21st, 2024, 3:19 pm
    mrbrowncanmoo wrote:My 3 sons ate every meal at the steakhouse and at every dinner each ordered a ribeye, a strip, and 2 lobster tails.

    All well and good but, unless you are the CEO of Kroger, how in the name of dear sweet Carol Channing's Ghost, do you afford to feed them at home?
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #21 - February 21st, 2024, 4:10 pm
    Post #21 - February 21st, 2024, 4:10 pm Post #21 - February 21st, 2024, 4:10 pm
    mrbrowncanmoo wrote:I think room service, bar service, or the wait staff near our swim up rooms delivered booze and food around the clock.

    Just to give you an idea, we took nothing out of the mini bar until we were leaving, when we grabbed the two packages each of peanuts and Oreos for the plane.

    We might have drunk the complimentary bottle of wine (can't carry it on the plane, airlines don't give a free checked bag to the Caribbean), but there's no corkscrew in the room.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #22 - February 22nd, 2024, 8:51 am
    Post #22 - February 22nd, 2024, 8:51 am Post #22 - February 22nd, 2024, 8:51 am
    G Wiv wrote:
    mrbrowncanmoo wrote:My 3 sons ate every meal at the steakhouse and at every dinner each ordered a ribeye, a strip, and 2 lobster tails.

    All well and good but, unless you are the CEO of Kroger, how in the name of dear sweet Carol Channing's Ghost, do you afford to feed them at home?


    They were extremely gluttonous at an all inclusive. The good news is all but 1 live on their own and pay their own food bills! However, when they were younger the challenge was keeping food in the house. I mean they drank two gallons of milk and a large box cereal daily. On top of it they are big men. All 6'3-6'5 and all 200-225lbs. They are the smallest 20 somethings in our family! I think my bride had a room at Aldi and Costco since she was there so much.
  • Post #23 - February 22nd, 2024, 10:25 am
    Post #23 - February 22nd, 2024, 10:25 am Post #23 - February 22nd, 2024, 10:25 am
    mrbrowncanmoo wrote:
    G Wiv wrote:
    mrbrowncanmoo wrote:My 3 sons ate every meal at the steakhouse and at every dinner each ordered a ribeye, a strip, and 2 lobster tails.

    All well and good but, unless you are the CEO of Kroger, how in the name of dear sweet Carol Channing's Ghost, do you afford to feed them at home?


    They were extremely gluttonous at an all inclusive. The good news is all but 1 live on their own and pay their own food bills! However, when they were younger the challenge was keeping food in the house. I mean they drank two gallons of milk and a large box cereal daily. On top of it they are big men. All 6'3-6'5 and all 200-225lbs. They are the smallest 20 somethings in our family! I think my bride had a room at Aldi and Costco since she was there so much.


    I was gonna say that rent at the resort might be a deal compared to your food bill :p
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #24 - February 22nd, 2024, 12:13 pm
    Post #24 - February 22nd, 2024, 12:13 pm Post #24 - February 22nd, 2024, 12:13 pm
    When our kids were college-age the all-inclusive deal worked to our advantage on frozen alcoholic drinks and fish tacos poolside. Our boys had significant tolerance threshholds and sizable bladders - at least when we were paying.
  • Post #25 - February 23rd, 2024, 1:16 pm
    Post #25 - February 23rd, 2024, 1:16 pm Post #25 - February 23rd, 2024, 1:16 pm
    spinynorman99 wrote:When our kids were college-age the all-inclusive deal worked to our advantage on frozen alcoholic drinks and fish tacos poolside. Our boys had significant tolerance threshholds and sizable bladders - at least when we were paying.


    That sums it up perfectly!! My kids were taught to order what they want when we are out. I would not take them to a place we as a family could not afford. They still order that way and every once in a blue moon will pick up a tab!!!

    As for the all inclusive it was a fun and relatively affordable trip with a huge extended family. Plus it was awesome to miss subzero weather. We all ate and drank too much! The question remains would I do it again? I would if the price were right,
  • Post #26 - February 27th, 2024, 12:38 pm
    Post #26 - February 27th, 2024, 12:38 pm Post #26 - February 27th, 2024, 12:38 pm
    Three data points from the last few years:

    Occidental at Xcaret, Riviera Maya had unlimited peak-fresh guacamole at every meal, which by Chicago prices made the whole trip a great value, not even factoring additional package options which include the excellent regional fare at the Xcaret eco-archaeological park next door with highly specialized ingredients including insects, smoked foods, moles, and game meats.

    Tanque Verde, outside Tucson, was rock-solid with scratch cooking and prickly pear margaritas. It was simpler fare with some Cowboy Kent Rollins-like styling both on the trail and in the dining hall. It had even been recommended among Chicago chefs looking for a break.

    Lalandia at Legoland, Billund, Denmark (some packages all-inclusive, others not) had the worst institutional food I have ever seen or imagined, with "Mexican," "Italian," and "American" options each worse than the last. The drinks other than the European beers were also weak and artificial. Loved the waterpark and Danish design accommodations at least. Avoid the extended stay offers and hit the nearby supermarket for excellent dairy products, fish, and vegetables to use in your kitchenette.
  • Post #27 - March 9th, 2024, 2:43 pm
    Post #27 - March 9th, 2024, 2:43 pm Post #27 - March 9th, 2024, 2:43 pm
    Santander wrote:The problem: the average room night at these three {all inclusive} places is about $800...

    Agree, Mrs Willie & myself do not drink near the amount of alcohol when we were younger and on vaca so all inclusive, besides the food quality/choice issues, is just not of value to us. We haven't stayed at an all inclusive in many years as they are not how we like to travel and are not a value to us.

    Some dear friends are heading to Cancun in 1.5 weeks and convinced us to join them. We agreed but stated outright we'd only spend two nights at an all inclusive with them.

    United had award tickets at only 6,000 award miles per leg from ORD-CUN-ORD, so we are flying on a terrific redemption. I redeemed some hotel points for 4 nights at an IHG property. Then the last two nights we are spending at the Grand Moon Palace at $1,000 per night (I about had a heart attack paying that rate but these are great friends so we'll spend the two nights with them). Grand Moon Palace is supposed to be a very good all inclusive, will report back on the food/booze choices.
    I did absolutely nothing and it was everything I thought it could be.
  • Post #28 - March 9th, 2024, 8:33 pm
    Post #28 - March 9th, 2024, 8:33 pm Post #28 - March 9th, 2024, 8:33 pm
    We'd started at Moon Palace Cancun a few years ago - not the Grand half but we did spend a day on that half by sitting in on their timeshare-ish club presentation. There's only a couple restaurants available only to the Grand side, in general they were pretty good at all their spots (the Excellence in Punta Cana I described above was better though). We used Costco to book Moon Palace - it was a lot less than $1000/night, and included a fair amount of resort credit for excursions.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang

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