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Beer and Cheese Tour of Wisconsin: Monroe to Madison

Beer and Cheese Tour of Wisconsin: Monroe to Madison
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  • Beer and Cheese Tour of Wisconsin: Monroe to Madison

    Post #1 - October 28th, 2006, 10:39 am
    Post #1 - October 28th, 2006, 10:39 am Post #1 - October 28th, 2006, 10:39 am
    A couple weekends ago, as Fall was just announcing itself, we got the hankerin for some beers that are not available in Chicago (and this was BEFORE we knew Bells was pulling out) and headed north of the border.

    Our first destination was Monroe, home of Huber Brewing and the Baumgartner Cheese Shop. On the way to this place we passed through Beloit and noted a few things. 1) Gas was the cheapest of anywhere on our trip at 3.19 per gallon (it was 3.75 in chicago/bucktown at that point). 2) there is a Woodmans, and 3) just outside of town in the way to Monroe, there was a Mennonite Store (Kaufmanns). Don't know if anyone has been. This was missed opportunity #1.

    In Monroe, we headed directly to Baumgartners for a half pint of Huber bock and a limburger sandwich. This comes with red onions on soft rye bread. Slightly pungent. The bite that was balanced nicely by the chili (which had big chunks of tender beef and tomato). A great way to start the day.

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    This was breakfast. Baumgartners is always packed with locals. People of every age fill the tavern in the back. We picked up some 5 year old cheddar on the way out the door, and it comes with instructions on how to keep it in a wonderful old timey font. (These cards may even actually still be PRINTED with a printing press).

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    Sadly, when Griffin was buying his cheese our meter expired and we got stuck with a parking ticket. The cost -- a whopping $2. Payable to a letter box attached to the meter. Too quaint not to pay! We ponied up and supported this little town with beer and strong cheese.

    Also located near Monroe is the original Brennan's (an overgrown farmstand with a selection of cheese and preserves) and the Alp n Dell retail store for Roth Kase cheese.

    From Monroe, we drove north to New Glarus. The brewery was our next destination (New Glarus beers are no longer available in Illinois). For a couple of dollars, you can get a taster set of beers and get to keep the tasting glass. Samples that day were of Yokel, Spotted Cow, Fat Squirrel, and Raspberry Tart. I had forgotten how the Raspberry Tart is a tad more sour and complex than Lindemans. By noon, we had bought our first case of beer.

    ImageImage

    Missed opportunity #2 was that there was probably a good sausage destination in New Glarus that we missed. Between Ruef's Meat Market and Hoesly's we might have found some interesting sausage...

    Our next stop was for lunch outside of Madison at a fine barsto-raunt named Quivey's Grove. The bar is in the old stable and the restuarant in the barn. The woodwork is gorgeous. Split beam rafters and even leather straps around the joints. Pretty cool.

    Plus they have a very nice tap selection of local microbrews and we split a very good sandwich (pork loin with apple cherry sauerkraut, swiss cheese and a cranberry mustard. The side was a dish of garlic smashed potatoes that was a cross between german potato salad and mashed potatoes. Large chunks of red potatoes with garlic and bacon? and sour cream. Wonderful.

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    Once again, we passed over a sausage stop, the Bavaria Sausage Company just down the road, in our haste to make to Quivey's before the end of lunch (turned out not to matter -- the waitress was very friendly and happy to serve us even though they were clearly in between lunch and dinner times).

    For the remainder of the afternoon we wound around the Madison beltway stopping at the better beer stores (Steve's on Mineral Point, Woodman's on Gammon, a quick stop at the Capital Brewery in Middleton, Steve's on University, ending at Riley's in town).

    For a late afternoon snack, we had a oyster po boy on our way into downtown Madison at the New Orleans take out place on Monroe Street. The oysters were tasty, but the bread to seafood ratio was off, and the little fried jewels were overwhelmed by the roll.

    Our second midafternoon snack was at Pel Meni on State Street (around 505), and this was a true hit. The menu is simple -- meat or potato dumplings, spicy or not, $5 per order. We got half meat, half potato, all spicy. They come with free sour cream and slices of soft rye bread. The meat were (of course) better. The spicy sauce was like a curried buffalo sauce (hot sauce, curry and cilantro) and had a real kick to it. I can see how these might become addictive.

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    Our evening in Madison was spent at the beer destinations, starting at Great Dane which was somewhat dissappointing in their beer selection (nothing very distinctive, so many colors of hoppy water). We headed down the hill to Comeback Inn and Essen House. The Comeback Inn had a great beerlist. And the Essen House had another great beerlist, including TWO doppelbocks. The Comeback Inn has a similar feel to Resi's -- a local German pub. Could have been anywhere in Lancaster/Berks Co PA or Wisconsin. Free popcorn and peanuts and blue collar feel.

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    The Essen House is the restaurant on the other side of a swinging door from the Comeback Inn and it has a great beerhall atmosphere. On this particular weekend night it was very festive. The place was full and rowdy. Alot like a German beer hall, a little more like a German beerhall with some American tourists -- but still very very fun. I got carried away and convinced Griffin we should have dinner here. This was a poor choice.

    The rouladen were described as thin steak and bacon wrapped around sausage. How could you go wrong with that? well they came out looking like two turds on a plate, with cardboard spaeztle and no sauce. The "french onion soup" was barely dishwater. I desparately need to get back to Laschets to settle the cravings this place left in its wake. So don't eat here. But it is a worthwhile stop on a Madison beer tour for BEER.

    Following our little trip to Germany, we headed up the hill for a nightcap at a new place called Maduro. This is a cigar bar with top shelf liquor and the best beer list we saw in Madison. We had a wonderful oak aged Pilgram's Dole from New Holland, and also a Bell's "Hell Hath no Fury" a strong dark belgian ale. A nice end to the evening.

    The next day was the Farmer's Market where we walked around in a circle and bought squash, cheese and sausages. Tasted "ground berries", a tomatillo relative, that had a nutty flavor. Purchased a lovely "bandaged cheddar" and some lamb skin wieners. And rhubarb preserves. And apples. We fortified with a pasty from Myles Teddywedger's Cornish Pasty. Turned out to be like a calzone (rather than a sausage roll). But very good pastry and good filling to pastry ratio (i.e. a lot of filling).

    We then headed out of town toward the airport to stop at the new location of Ale Asylum (largely the old brewing/staff of now defunct Angelic Brewing). The new digs are a slightly too-hip-for-madison warehouse location near the airport. Some good beers can happen here. On this trip, we sampled a few belgian styles which had some good points.

    Further east we stopped at the tasting room of the Tyranena brewery (another warehouse, which in this case is really their bottling plant and warehouse) and were treated to their selection of beers which we cannot get in Illinois. Although we just missed their barleywine, the Rocky's Revenge was a fine brown ale. They also know their hops with beers like Hop Whore and Bitter Woman from Hell. Very nice people at the brewery and the tasting room is clearly a favorite bar for locals. We stayed the night out here at a motel on Rock Lake in town. I didn't realize the intrigue of the area until we got back, but there are supposed to be old indian structures (stone teepees/pyramids) in the lake and at a nearby park (Aztalan).

    On Sunday morning we got up early and made it to Mickey's Dairy Bar (in Madison) before the crowds. It did not disappoint in either food or ambiance. The double smoked bacon was magnificent. We picked up some at Woodmans on our way out of the state (probably not the same brand, but still delicious). Also a reuben omelet that was clearly made with homemade corned beef (big chunks). The couple next to us was squeaky clean, she with red hair and freckles, he a blond with a cleanly pressed packers jersey. In Wisconsin is that proper church attire? From all other indications, they were headed to church after the meal... Definitely a trip back to the 50s. And great food.

    Of course, there is tons we missed on this theme in this short trip. Nearby is another brewery, Lake Louie, that would have been a fine destination as well and is another beer not available in IL to look for.

    We did bring home a fine array of beers and cheeses. We were less successful in the sausage department (especially with finding much in the way of lamb or game/venison). So if anyone can recommend Ruef's Meat Market or Hoesly's or Bavaria Sausage Company, or another one along this route, please chime in! I lobbied to return via Milwaukee but was overruled.

    We will certainly explore these on our next trip, but as always we'd love to have the benefit of others knowledge!

    Monroe
    Baumgartner's Cheese Store and Tavern
    1023 16th Avenue
    Monroe, WI 53566-1764
    (608) 325-6157

    Brennan's
    701 8th Street
    Monroe, WI 53566
    (608) 325-4433

    Alp N Dell
    657 Second Street in Monroe, Wisconsin, 53566

    New Glarus
    New Glarus Brewery http://www.newglarusbrewing.com/
    Cty Trk W & Hwy. 69
    New Glarus, WI 53574
    (608)527-5850

    Madison
    Quivey's Grove
    6261 Nesbitt Road, Madison, WI 53719
    (608) 273-4900

    New Orleans Take Out
    1517 Monroe St, Madison, 53711

    Pel Meni
    5050 State St. Madison

    Myles Teddywedger's Cornish Pasty
    On the corner of State at the Capital Square.

    Mickey Dairy Bar
    1511 Monroe Street Madison

    Essen House/Come Back In http://www.essen-haus.com/essenhaus.htm
    514 East Wilsonstrasse
    Madison, Wisconsin 53703

    Maduro
    http://www.madurocigarbar.com/
    117 E Main St

    Ale Asylum
    3698 KINSMAN BLVD | MADISON WI 53704
    http://www.aleasylum.com/

    Tyranena
    Tyranena Brewing Company LLC http://www.tyranena.com/
    1025 Owen Street
    PO Box 736
    Lake Mills, WI 53551
  • Post #2 - October 28th, 2006, 11:36 am
    Post #2 - October 28th, 2006, 11:36 am Post #2 - October 28th, 2006, 11:36 am
    eerie. I was moving a stack of papers in my office a couple of days ago, and a Baumgartner's mailorder form fell out. It has been sitting on my desk since then. Today, I picked it up and looked at it. I started thinking about Limburger and Huber beer, and how it might be time for a trip to Monroe. After all, due to a recent ailment, I have been neglecting my quota of these 2 important members of the 4 basic food groups (the others being sausage and mustard). Then I logged onto LTH Forum and saw this thread. Just coincidence, or is King Gambrinus sending me a message from beyond the Cheddar Veil? Ahh, the power of cheese (and beer).
  • Post #3 - October 28th, 2006, 11:57 pm
    Post #3 - October 28th, 2006, 11:57 pm Post #3 - October 28th, 2006, 11:57 pm
    griffin's wife wrote:In Monroe, we headed directly to Baumgartners for a half pint of Huber bock and a Limburger sandwich. This comes with red onions on soft rye bread. Slightly pungent.

    Slightly pungent? Slightly pungent? (he says again) It's been 5-years since I last ate a Baumgartners Limburger and onion sandwich and I can still taste the darn thing. I love Baumgartners Limburger almost as much as I love the place in general, but Slightly Pungent. :shock:

    Great round up of places, though next time in the Monroe area I'd suggest a stop at the Mustard Museum in Mount Horeb. The Mustard Museum seem like the type of place you would enjoy.

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #4 - November 1st, 2006, 2:45 pm
    Post #4 - November 1st, 2006, 2:45 pm Post #4 - November 1st, 2006, 2:45 pm
    I've been to busy to post a report on my September trip up to Mineral Point for their Cornish Festival but I recommend a visit to this interesting little town if you're in that area. I also stopped by New Glarus and filled my trunk with beer (several bottles of Belgian Red, one of their best are all that's left, safely locked away and cellared).

    Just about every place in Mineral Point has a pasty on the menu, but the real Cornish visitors seem to approve of Red Rooster's as the best. Here it is as was served at the Cornish Fest. That isn't ketchup, it's a sweet 'chili' sauce (in some parts, especially the U.P. referred to as 'hurry-up sauce') with tinges of cinnamon and allspice.

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    Also in town is the Brewery Creek Inn, which brews some excellent, if basic, beer - an amber, an ale, a porter and a stout, unadorned by any fanciness. It's hours are very limited (they close at 8pm) and are now open only Thurs-Sat in the winter. They've got really good twice-fried Belgian fries and food with a real attention to quality. I've had their tempura battered cod and their excellent bourbon steak.


    The Brewery Creek Inn
    23 Commerce Street

    Red Rooster Cafe
    158 High St.

    Mineral Point, WI
  • Post #5 - November 2nd, 2006, 12:41 pm
    Post #5 - November 2nd, 2006, 12:41 pm Post #5 - November 2nd, 2006, 12:41 pm
    Grififn's wife wrote:
    Missed opportunity #2 was that there was probably a good sausage destination in New Glarus that we missed. Between Ruef's Meat Market and Hoesly's we might have found some interesting sausage...


    Ruef's Meat Market did have an excellent kalberwurst (spelling?). If you ask, they will give you their recipe for cooking it.

    It's been many years since I've had it. It was an excellent sausage -- milder and more finely ground than most bratwurst, but with a nice flavor.
    Last edited by George R on November 3rd, 2006, 11:25 am, edited 1 time in total.
    Where there’s smoke, there may be salmon.
  • Post #6 - November 3rd, 2006, 9:46 am
    Post #6 - November 3rd, 2006, 9:46 am Post #6 - November 3rd, 2006, 9:46 am
    Another good sausage stop in Monroe is Zuber's Sausage Kitchen. Zuber's makes a fantastic, garlicky Landjaeger (ala the late, great Joe the sausage King).
    Pairs of Zuber's Landjaegers can often be found at the cash registers of many southern Wisconsin gas stations.

    Zuber's Sausage Kithchen
    512 18th Ave
    Monroe,Wis
    (608) 329-6500
  • Post #7 - December 1st, 2006, 1:33 pm
    Post #7 - December 1st, 2006, 1:33 pm Post #7 - December 1st, 2006, 1:33 pm
    Hi - I'm the owner of Ruef's Meat Market and happened upon this forum while surfing. I'm sorry you missed the opportunity to stop in during your roadtrip G.W. but wanted to let you know you can stop in virtually by visiting our website at www.ruefsmeatmarket.com and we can ship any of our smoked products to you - including our landjaegers which - no offense JSM - I'll put up against Zubers (or anybody elses') in the blind Pepsi taste challenge any day of the week!

    Sorry George R. but we can't ship kalberwurst (it's a fresh sausage and consequently wouldn't survive the trip.)

    Anyway, I don't mean to intrude with a bunch of blatant marketeering, but feel free to contact me if you would like to know anything about our products. There's email links all over the website.

    Incidentally, out of all those beers you sampled, which ones ranked on top? (I gotta route for the home town New Glarus brews but I'm curious to hear a less biased opinion :wink: )

    One last note - might I suggest that if any of you are ever in New Glarus (again), be sure to have lunch or dinner at The Glarner Stube (tiny little restaurant at 518 1st street - just 3 doors down from our store) - far and away the best food in town!! Be sure to try the Roesti - fried shredded potatoes with swiss cheese and onions in them - absolutely to die for!
  • Post #8 - December 1st, 2006, 3:38 pm
    Post #8 - December 1st, 2006, 3:38 pm Post #8 - December 1st, 2006, 3:38 pm
    bruef,

    Welcome. I was just checking out your website and the sausages look great. All I have to do is find a way to escape town for a couple of days and I'll get a chance to try your kalberwurst (and others).

    griffin's wife,

    Great post; many thanks. Somehow, I had missed it when you first posted but enjoyed it today.

    Antonius
    Alle Nerven exzitiert von dem gewürzten Wein -- Anwandlung von Todesahndungen -- Doppeltgänger --
    - aus dem Tagebuch E.T.A. Hoffmanns, 6. Januar 1804.
    ________
    Na sir is na seachain an cath.
  • Post #9 - December 2nd, 2006, 3:46 pm
    Post #9 - December 2nd, 2006, 3:46 pm Post #9 - December 2nd, 2006, 3:46 pm
    bruef wrote:
    we can't ship kalberwurst (it's a fresh sausage and consequently wouldn't survive the trip


    For anyone who will be visitng New Glarus I recommend bringing along a cooler. Fill it with kalberwurst and some ice for the trip home. You won't regret it.
    Where there’s smoke, there may be salmon.
  • Post #10 - December 2nd, 2006, 10:30 pm
    Post #10 - December 2nd, 2006, 10:30 pm Post #10 - December 2nd, 2006, 10:30 pm
    Just back from a day trip to pick up a ham from the holidays (Lena Maid Meats, under the water tower in Lena, IL, absolutely the best of the non country ham style I've ever had, note this is an uncooked smoked ham).

    As Lena is just south and west of Monroe, we decided on an early supper at Baumgartners. My limburger sandwich came with a mint on top:-) I am nostalgic about this part of the country, my paternal family is from thereabouts, I had an aunt who owned and leased several farms in the area (German Valley, Davis) as well as a number of cousins who farmed when I was growing up (Cedarville, Orangeville) all of whom sold their milk to dairies in Monroe. Going "up to Monroe" was a trip of some importance, however, I guess crossing state lines used to mean more:-)

    I read somewhere that Monroe is the last place in the country to produce limburger, which is a sad commentary. It's really not that strong a cheese, compared to some of the soft-ripened European cheeses now readily available around the country, but...

    We took the back route from Lena to Monroe, up through Winslow. On the way you pass Torkelson's Dairy, which makes a good muenster cheese, but even better, will sell you still warm cream at the store if you bring your own bottle. Sadly, the cheese store was closed, but when we passed by there were dairy trucks entering and leaving with the evening's milk.

    A beautiful ride through what my godmother used to call "God's Country." Except for the hour delay at the O'Hare toll booth, time well spent.
  • Post #11 - December 5th, 2006, 10:16 pm
    Post #11 - December 5th, 2006, 10:16 pm Post #11 - December 5th, 2006, 10:16 pm
    G Wiv wrote:I love Baumgartners Limburger almost as much as I love the place in general, but Slightly Pungent. :shock:


    Well, it was strong enough that I was glad to have the chili to cut the intensity, but it certainly wasn't the incredibly stinky cheese I come to imagine from watching the the "Little Rascals".
  • Post #12 - December 14th, 2006, 6:57 am
    Post #12 - December 14th, 2006, 6:57 am Post #12 - December 14th, 2006, 6:57 am
    As is so often the case with this kind of stuff, limburger has an undeserved reputation for being much worse than it actually is thanks to the media and the like. Yes it has a "scent" to it (which people usually over-react to because they expect it to smell like you fell into a septic tank) but it's really tasty. My only problem with it is that I can only handle eating a small amount because it's very rich.
    And yes, the Chalet Cheese Co-op in Monroe is the only limburger factory in the states. I actually think that's kind of cool myself - mostly due to home-town pride but also because it's one of the few products in this country that hasn't been usurped and sterilized and homogenized (no pun intended) by huge corporations and conglomerates.
  • Post #13 - December 14th, 2006, 9:30 am
    Post #13 - December 14th, 2006, 9:30 am Post #13 - December 14th, 2006, 9:30 am
    bruef wrote:One last note - might I suggest that if any of you are ever in New Glarus (again), be sure to have lunch or dinner at The Glarner Stube (tiny little restaurant at 518 1st street - just 3 doors down from our store) - far and away the best food in town!! Be sure to try the Roesti - fried shredded potatoes with swiss cheese and onions in them - absolutely to die for!
    Thanks for the Rösti tip. When I had a job that would take me to Switzerland often, I would eat Rösti 3 times a day if I could. My Swiss co-workers used to tease me about my fixation on the dish. Upon arrival, my first dinner was always Züricher Geschnetzels mit Rösti (not exactly health food). I have tried making the dish here at home, but the texture is never quite right. It is a simple recipe, but I must be missing some trick.

    Another thing I miss from Switzerland, especially this time of year, is Basler Leckerli, the honey and spice cookies from Basel. Is there a bakery in New Glarus that sells these treats?
  • Post #14 - December 15th, 2006, 1:04 pm
    Post #14 - December 15th, 2006, 1:04 pm Post #14 - December 15th, 2006, 1:04 pm
    bruef wrote:As is so often the case with this kind of stuff, limburger has an undeserved reputation for being much worse than it actually is thanks to the media and the like.

    ..... it's one of the few products in this country that hasn't been usurped and sterilized and homogenized (no pun intended) by huge corporations and conglomerates.


    I suspect these two issues are related. The undue negative rep that popular media has given to limburger probably has something to do with big corporations not having an interest in mass producing psuedo versions that are only similar in name, like the ubiquitous "cheddar".
    On the other hand, that same rep is also probably responsible for the lack of additional sources of real limburger which while good news for Monroe, also has some obvious downsides in terms of availability.
  • Post #15 - December 19th, 2006, 6:28 pm
    Post #15 - December 19th, 2006, 6:28 pm Post #15 - December 19th, 2006, 6:28 pm
    Last weekend was spent boozing through this region, or slightly north. I thought I’d build upon what’s been previously written here. (Many of these places have also been covered in various posts around the board.)

    Plans started with “Let’s visit Taliesin (Frank Lloyd Wright’s place in Spring Green), and then see what else we can find in the area.” Only after booking the B&B did we find out that, for the most part, Taliesin is closed in the winter months. Didn’t matter. There was plenty to do.

    First stop was in the charming town of Mt. Horeb, best known for its Norwegian heritage, which means trolls everywhere – cruise down the “trollway” to interact more of these guys than I’ve ever seen since peering into my sister’s bedroom in the early 1960s.

    Dinner was at The Grumpy Troll – reasonably good pub food, surprisingly impressive brews, including a couple of Rye beers, and a very big IPA (although I’d argue with them calling one of their beers an Imperial Stout when it's 6.7% ABV).

    Image

    Mt. Horeb (apparently the name is a biblical reference) is also well known as the home of the Mustard Museum, which has been previously discussed here.

    The unassuming storefront on the main drag:
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    Just one Wall O’ Mustard in the museum (which contains over 5,000 varieties):
    Image

    In addition, over 500 varieties are available – with many available for tasting – in the gift shop. Don’t tell my siblings what they’re getting for Christmas.
    Image

    Just down the street, a local bar offers truth (albeit misspelled) in advertising:
    Image

    From Mt. Horeb, we ventured down to New Glarus – a Swiss community with one of the country’s great microbreweries, which has also been discussed previously on the board. The current brewery, which will in time be used only for their specialty beers (ground was broken last May for a new, larger brewery/visitors’ center):
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    Interestingly, New Glarus is one of the very few of this country’s commercial breweries to do a decoction mash. Brew kettles:
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    If you’re in the area, run, don’t walk, to stock up on their limited edition Enigma ale. Brewed with wild yeasts and whole cherries, matured in oak, it’s a cross between a Belgian sour brown (i.e. Flanders) ale and a Kriek. Rich, intense … it’s a beer to contemplate. Slowly. With other beer aficionados. People with whom you can speak in hushed tones. Not recommended to have in hand as you’re mowing the lawn next spring (they’ll probably be sold out by then anyway).

    One more stop – at Wollersheim Winery in Prairie du Sac. A beautiful, frustrating place. The grounds are impressive, with buildings dating back to the mid-1800s. If only the wines were good. Vines grown on the grounds are all French hybrids – their Chardonnay, Pinot Noir and other classical varietals are made from grapes purchased elsewhere – mostly from Washington, we were told. Classical varieties were fine, but better wines at lower prices are available elsewhere, IMHO. The Prairie Fumé, which I assumed would be based on Sauvignon Blanc, was actually a Seyval Blanc, although it wasn’t bad – it did have the sweet start-slightly bitter finish that you might find in a Vouvray. Overall, though, I went in (probably over-optimistically) expecting Napa County, and finding Berrien County.

    Image

    But the B&B was an amazingly well-restored historic home in the area is in the little town of Mazomanie … Walking Iron. Four rooms, all with two-person whirlpool baths; the owners spent many years painstakingly bringing the property back to its original 1865 appearance.

    Walking Iron Bed & Breakfast

    Image

    One note – based on one visit, the good-sounding restaurant two blocks away is worth skipping.

    But the area is definitely worth a visit — even when Taliesin is closed.
  • Post #16 - July 7th, 2008, 9:36 am
    Post #16 - July 7th, 2008, 9:36 am Post #16 - July 7th, 2008, 9:36 am
    For Gary and all you other Limburger fans, you should probably know about the Bayreisher Bergstiger Kase from Kutter's:

    http://www.kuttercheese.com/

    They do business by mail, too. It's a *very* nice limburger, smooth, tasty, and just precisely stinky enough. Kutter's aged cheddars are very nice too. Good people to do biz with.

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #17 - August 4th, 2009, 2:47 pm
    Post #17 - August 4th, 2009, 2:47 pm Post #17 - August 4th, 2009, 2:47 pm
    Two other fantastic beer experiences in Madison are the Rathskeller in the UW Memorial Student Union. It overlooks beautiful Lake Mendota and can be beat on a spring or summer evening. Also the outdoor beer garden at the Capital Brewery in Middleton right off the beltway and University Avenue, 15 minute west of downtown.
  • Post #18 - August 5th, 2009, 8:28 am
    Post #18 - August 5th, 2009, 8:28 am Post #18 - August 5th, 2009, 8:28 am
    Of course THE best and most fantastic beer experience is in Madison this Saturday: Great Taste of the Midwest.

    Usually 100 – 125 brewers, each with 3 – 6 different beers…..pure beer geek heaven.

    D.
  • Post #19 - August 5th, 2009, 8:36 am
    Post #19 - August 5th, 2009, 8:36 am Post #19 - August 5th, 2009, 8:36 am
    dodger wrote:Of course THE best and most fantastic beer experience is in Madison this Saturday: Great Taste of the Midwest.

    Usually 100 – 125 brewers, each with 3 – 6 different beers…..pure beer geek heaven.

    D.
    Yeah, except that the tickets sell out super-early, so this info sadly can do nothing more than make some of us sad that we're not going!

    :(
    Ronna
  • Post #20 - August 5th, 2009, 8:50 am
    Post #20 - August 5th, 2009, 8:50 am Post #20 - August 5th, 2009, 8:50 am
    The Mustard Museum is moving to Middleton FYI.
    i used to milk cows
  • Post #21 - August 5th, 2009, 9:08 am
    Post #21 - August 5th, 2009, 9:08 am Post #21 - August 5th, 2009, 9:08 am
    I agree with you REB. But I have gone to this event many times. I have always seen people there with extra tickets to sell. These are not scalpers, just people trying to sell tickets at face.

    The Friday before the fest, Capital Brewery has a big party at their outdoor garden. Very often people try to sell tickets at that time. Before the fest opens while waiting in the line, there are people selling then too.

    I know there is some risk to going there without a ticket, but I believe it is worth it.

    D.
  • Post #22 - August 5th, 2009, 9:22 am
    Post #22 - August 5th, 2009, 9:22 am Post #22 - August 5th, 2009, 9:22 am
    dodger wrote:I agree with you REB. But I have gone to this event many times. I have always seen people there with extra tickets to sell. These are not scalpers, just people trying to sell tickets at face.

    The Friday before the fest, Capital Brewery has a big party at their outdoor garden. Very often people try to sell tickets at that time. Before the fest opens while waiting in the line, there are people selling then too.

    I know there is some risk to going there without a ticket, but I believe it is worth it.

    D.
    Good tips, thanks. If only Madison weren't 2 1/2 hours away as I'd be less than happy to drive up there only to turn around and head back to Chicago!

    Ronna
  • Post #23 - August 5th, 2009, 6:42 pm
    Post #23 - August 5th, 2009, 6:42 pm Post #23 - August 5th, 2009, 6:42 pm
    REB wrote:
    dodger wrote:I agree with you REB. But I have gone to this event many times. I have always seen people there with extra tickets to sell. These are not scalpers, just people trying to sell tickets at face.

    The Friday before the fest, Capital Brewery has a big party at their outdoor garden. Very often people try to sell tickets at that time. Before the fest opens while waiting in the line, there are people selling then too.

    I know there is some risk to going there without a ticket, but I believe it is worth it.

    D.
    Good tips, thanks. If only Madison weren't 2 1/2 hours away as I'd be less than happy to drive up there only to turn around and head back to Chicago!

    Ronna


    Turn back? No no. Saturday in Madison is the day of the most fabulous farmers market in the country. You can easily spend hours perusing and gathering a picnic, then head to gorgeous view at the free-access rooftop of Monona Terrace to enjoy your bounty. Then there are beautiful lakes in which to kayak, and some wonderful restaurants at which to have dinner. If you can't tell, I love Madison.
    ...defended from strong temptations to social ambition by a still stronger taste for tripe and onions." Screwtape in The Screwtape Letters by CS Lewis

    Fuckerberg on Food
  • Post #24 - August 5th, 2009, 7:34 pm
    Post #24 - August 5th, 2009, 7:34 pm Post #24 - August 5th, 2009, 7:34 pm
    Kennyz wrote:
    REB wrote:
    dodger wrote:I agree with you REB. But I have gone to this event many times. I have always seen people there with extra tickets to sell. These are not scalpers, just people trying to sell tickets at face.

    The Friday before the fest, Capital Brewery has a big party at their outdoor garden. Very often people try to sell tickets at that time. Before the fest opens while waiting in the line, there are people selling then too.

    I know there is some risk to going there without a ticket, but I believe it is worth it.

    D.
    Good tips, thanks. If only Madison weren't 2 1/2 hours away as I'd be less than happy to drive up there only to turn around and head back to Chicago!

    Ronna


    Turn back? No no. Saturday in Madison is the day of the most fabulous farmers market in the country. You can easily spend hours perusing and gathering a picnic, then head to gorgeous view at the free-access rooftop of Monona Terrace to enjoy your bounty. Then there are beautiful lakes in which to kayak, and some wonderful restaurants at which to have dinner. If you can't tell, I love Madison.
    Fortunately, we already have plans to drive to Madison at the end of the month. And, we're timing the trip so that we take advantage of the Dane County market.

    Care to recommend a Friday night restaurant? I've read a bunch of reviews and am concerned that Harvest and L'Etoile won't stand out given the great locally-focused restaurants we have here. We're happy, of course, to dine somewhere more casual.

    Ronna
  • Post #25 - August 5th, 2009, 7:54 pm
    Post #25 - August 5th, 2009, 7:54 pm Post #25 - August 5th, 2009, 7:54 pm
    Ronna,

    I like both Harvest and L'Etoile quite a bit, but you are right to think that they won't necessarily stand out among the best places in Chicago. That said, they are excellent restaurants with great cooks and a strong commitment to sourcing and serving the best local ingredients. Though they may not "stand out," I'd return to each place without hesitation, as they're just really good restaurants.

    Sadly, one of my favorite restaurants of all time - the former Deb & Lola's - has been long closed since I stopped living in Madison. Another of my favorites, however, is still around: the super-casual Lao Laan Xang. Keeping in mind that my last visit was a couple of years ago, I have powerfully positive memories of the Laotian food here. Especially the complex, deep broths used to make the soups, and the intense, hold-no-punches spicing of all the dishes.

    Kenny
    ...defended from strong temptations to social ambition by a still stronger taste for tripe and onions." Screwtape in The Screwtape Letters by CS Lewis

    Fuckerberg on Food
  • Post #26 - August 5th, 2009, 7:58 pm
    Post #26 - August 5th, 2009, 7:58 pm Post #26 - August 5th, 2009, 7:58 pm
    Kennyz wrote:Ronna,

    I like both Harvest and L'Etoile quite a bit, but you are right to think that they won't necessarily stand out among the best places in Chicago. That said, they are excellent restaurants with great cooks and a strong commitment to sourcing and serving the best local ingredients. Though they may not "stand out," I'd return to each place without hesitation, as they're just really good restaurants.

    Sadly, one of my favorite restaurants of all time - the former Deb & Lola's - has been long closed since I stopped living in Madison. Another of my favorites, however, is still around: the super-casual Lao Laan Xang. Keeping in mind that my last visit was a couple of years ago, I have powerfully positive memories of the Laotian food here. Especially the complex, deep broths used to make the soups, and the intense, hold-no-punches spicing of all the dishes.

    Kenny
    Thanks, Kenny!
  • Post #27 - August 5th, 2009, 8:36 pm
    Post #27 - August 5th, 2009, 8:36 pm Post #27 - August 5th, 2009, 8:36 pm
    Debbie and I liked the food and philosophy at L'etoile quite a bit, but we always found it just a bit self-absorbed, as if all the staff were quite pleased with themselves...

    One of our all-time faves was Bandung. Simple, elegant, no pretensions.

    There are lots of good reasons to go to Mad-city, eh?! :)

    Geo

    Bandung Indonesian Restaurant
    www.bandungrestaurant.com

    600 Williamson St # M
    Madison, WI 53703-4509
    (608) 255-6910
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #28 - August 31st, 2011, 10:46 am
    Post #28 - August 31st, 2011, 10:46 am Post #28 - August 31st, 2011, 10:46 am
    griffin's wife wrote:Our next stop was for lunch outside of Madison at a fine barsto-raunt named Quivey's Grove. The bar is in the old stable and the restuarant in the barn. The woodwork is gorgeous. Split beam rafters and even leather straps around the joints. Pretty cool.

    Plus they have a very nice tap selection of local microbrews and we split a very good sandwich (pork loin with apple cherry sauerkraut, swiss cheese and a cranberry mustard. The side was a dish of garlic smashed potatoes that was a cross between german potato salad and mashed potatoes. Large chunks of red potatoes with garlic and bacon? and sour cream. Wonderful.


    Madison
    Quivey's Grove
    6261 Nesbitt Road, Madison, WI 53719
    (608) 273-4900



    nice find, thanks for posting about your visit.

    Quivey's Grove made for a nice lunch after a few hours enjoying the beer garden @ New Glarus Brewery. I snapped some pics of this scenic property, ill get em' up when I have time.

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