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  • Post #31 - September 9th, 2010, 2:56 pm
    Post #31 - September 9th, 2010, 2:56 pm Post #31 - September 9th, 2010, 2:56 pm
    Jim I walked over to Cochon Butcher one night had the house made Muffaletta, then to Drago's at the riverwalk for some oysters killer, and had a drink at the bar at August! That was a Trifecta!!!
    Do You Know What It Means To Miss New Orleans?...........Louis Armstrong
  • Post #32 - September 9th, 2010, 2:59 pm
    Post #32 - September 9th, 2010, 2:59 pm Post #32 - September 9th, 2010, 2:59 pm
    jhawk1 wrote:Jim I walked over to Cochon Butcher one night had the house made Muffaletta, then to Drago's at the riverwalk for some oysters killer, and had a drink at the bar at August! That was a Trifecta!!!



    that Cochon Butcher menu looks top notch, all thouse house made meats. Drago's is also on my list. Looks like I am doing pretty good so far with the list I am putting together. Its good to get feedback, confirmation.

    thanks for any tips.

    How was the walking around there solo? Im not a night owl so I wont be walking solo that late at night, and I am still pretty fast from my track days. :D
  • Post #33 - September 9th, 2010, 3:19 pm
    Post #33 - September 9th, 2010, 3:19 pm Post #33 - September 9th, 2010, 3:19 pm
    jimswside wrote:
    jhawk1 wrote:Jim I walked over to Cochon Butcher one night had the house made Muffaletta, then to Drago's at the riverwalk for some oysters killer, and had a drink at the bar at August! That was a Trifecta!!!



    that Cochon Butcher menu looks top notch, all thouse house made meats. Drago's is also on my list. Looks like I am doing pretty good so far with the list I am putting together. Its good to get feedback, confirmation.

    thanks for any tips.

    How was the walking around there solo? Im not a night owl so I wont be walking solo that late at night, and I am still pretty fast from my track days. :D


    Most of the places that you've mentioned, with the exception of Commander's, are in the French Quarter/River/CBD areas so you shouldn't be running from anything my friend. When you go to Commander's, check out the graveyard right by there (assuming it didn't wash away post-Katrina). There's nothing like NOLA cemetaries...Might not want to be wandering too much farther afield than that though over there (or should I say, than dat :P )
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #34 - September 9th, 2010, 3:26 pm
    Post #34 - September 9th, 2010, 3:26 pm Post #34 - September 9th, 2010, 3:26 pm
    Jim, I think we mentioned before, take advantage of the St Charles Street street cars. They can take you out within walking distance to Commander's Palace, to the zoo and many sights of the old historic homes. Pasqual's Manale, which we loved, was 2 blocks off the street car line at Napoleon and you can also go directly to Cameilla's Grille which is on the bend when the street cars turn and go up Carollton Ave. You shouldn't need to run.... us two old ladies did fine at night in these areas! The street cars run about every 20-30 minutes back and forth until late at night and are safe.
  • Post #35 - September 9th, 2010, 4:20 pm
    Post #35 - September 9th, 2010, 4:20 pm Post #35 - September 9th, 2010, 4:20 pm
    jimswside wrote:I didnt have Cochon on the list til' I checked out their menu and philosophy.

    Now they have to be at the top of my list for at least one visit. I have also printed a menu for Cochon Butcher whiose menu is just as amazing to me.


    I'd definitely recommend Cochon. If you're going to be there on a weekday, I'd suggest stopping by for a late lunch, say 1:30 or so (they are open through the afternoon & it's usually a lot more mellow environment than during dinner, which can get packed and loud).
    I exist in Chicago, but I live in New Orleans.
  • Post #36 - September 9th, 2010, 4:23 pm
    Post #36 - September 9th, 2010, 4:23 pm Post #36 - September 9th, 2010, 4:23 pm
    Last I was there, the streetcar didn't run up Carrolton any more. The end of the line was the curve in front of Camilia Grill. It might have changed by now, but I wouldn't count on it.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #37 - September 9th, 2010, 6:17 pm
    Post #37 - September 9th, 2010, 6:17 pm Post #37 - September 9th, 2010, 6:17 pm
    stevez wrote:Last I was there, the streetcar didn't run up Carrolton any more. The end of the line was the curve in front of Camilia Grill. It might have changed by now, but I wouldn't count on it.

    It was running up Carrolton Memorial Day weekend so maybe there was simply a temporary closure?
  • Post #38 - September 10th, 2010, 7:14 am
    Post #38 - September 10th, 2010, 7:14 am Post #38 - September 10th, 2010, 7:14 am
    thanks for the tips.

    Camelia Grill isnt really on my list at this point.(that could change), they specialize in breakfast right? I really dont do breakfast.
  • Post #39 - September 10th, 2010, 7:32 am
    Post #39 - September 10th, 2010, 7:32 am Post #39 - September 10th, 2010, 7:32 am
    jimswside wrote:thanks for the tips.

    Camelia Grill isnt really on my list at this point.(that could change), they specialize in breakfast right? I really dont do breakfast.


    the Grill is an anytime spot--don't miss it. The beef vegetable soup and grilled ham and cheese sandwich, followed by apple pie ala mode was my favorite comfort food in college. And it hasn't changed a bit. Burgers and fries are great. Shay will love the place (everyone sits at long curvy counter watching the cooks). I've never been anywhere like it.
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #40 - September 10th, 2010, 8:36 am
    Post #40 - September 10th, 2010, 8:36 am Post #40 - September 10th, 2010, 8:36 am
    jimswside wrote:thanks for the tips.

    Camelia Grill isnt really on my list at this point.(that could change), they specialize in breakfast right? I really dont do breakfast.


    They serve breakfast, but burgers (and the great staff) are the reasons to go. That and the home made pie which they heat up for you right on the flattop.

    Image

    Image

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    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #41 - September 10th, 2010, 8:58 am
    Post #41 - September 10th, 2010, 8:58 am Post #41 - September 10th, 2010, 8:58 am
    stevez wrote:
    jimswside wrote:thanks for the tips.

    Camelia Grill isnt really on my list at this point.(that could change), they specialize in breakfast right? I really dont do breakfast.


    They serve breakfast, but burgers (and the great staff) are the reasons to go. That and the home made pie which they heat up for you right on the flattop.



    i am now very very (adopted) homesick :(
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #42 - September 10th, 2010, 12:49 pm
    Post #42 - September 10th, 2010, 12:49 pm Post #42 - September 10th, 2010, 12:49 pm
    I went to Cochon over Memorial Day and it was outstanding. My friend owns Stein's Deli, which apparently is a big chef's hangout, so we were not only comped, but the bartender brought us 3 different "moonshines" from behind the bar. :shock:
  • Post #43 - September 10th, 2010, 12:51 pm
    Post #43 - September 10th, 2010, 12:51 pm Post #43 - September 10th, 2010, 12:51 pm
    I second (third) the recommendation for Camelia Grill. As others have noted, it is more than just a breakfast place, and is a neat place that should not be missed.

    I would consider adding Brightsen's to the mix for your solo dinner or even an early dinner with your family. I really enjoyed Commander's, but had one of my best meals ever at Brightsen's. IMO, Pascal's Manale was unimpressive and I would not be in a hurry to go back there. On the other hand, Brightsen's would be at or near the top of my list.

    Finally, I would exercise a little caution when walking (particularly alone and at night) in the neighborhoods outside of the French Quarter and CBD. While NOLA is not any more "dangerous", per se, than many of the Chicago neighborhoods that some LTH'ers frequent, it's always been my understanding that the neighborhoods can change quickly, even just a few blocks from the St. Charles streetcar line. My friend who went to Tulane advised me to exercise caution when going outside of the Quarter at night, and I felt it wise to heed his advice. Everyone has his or her own personal tolerance level for bad neighborhoods, so maybe you will be fine with it. Personally, when in doubt, I would take a cab (or have the restaurant call you a cab). Just my 2 cents - don't mean to offend anyone.
  • Post #44 - September 10th, 2010, 12:54 pm
    Post #44 - September 10th, 2010, 12:54 pm Post #44 - September 10th, 2010, 12:54 pm
    Jim, you might feel that your daughter is a bit young for this, but my sister's kids really enjoyed the WWII Museum. They learned a LOT, and months later are still quizzing me on my WWII knowledge. Now THAT's something today's educational system doesn't yield much any more.
    "Your swimming suit matches your eyes, you hold your nose before diving, loving you has made me bananas!"
  • Post #45 - September 10th, 2010, 3:09 pm
    Post #45 - September 10th, 2010, 3:09 pm Post #45 - September 10th, 2010, 3:09 pm
    Ron A. wrote:I would consider adding Brightsen's to the mix for your solo dinner or even an early dinner with your family. I really enjoyed Commander's, but had one of my best meals ever at Brightsen's. IMO, Pascal's Manale was unimpressive and I would not be in a hurry to go back there. On the other hand, Brightsen's would be at or near the top of my list.


    I couldn't agree with you more - Brigtsen's is my favorite restaurant in New Orleans, bar none.

    Pascal's Manale does have an excellent raw bar which I visit with some frequency, but I haven't dined there in years after a few lackluster experiences.
    I exist in Chicago, but I live in New Orleans.
  • Post #46 - September 10th, 2010, 3:13 pm
    Post #46 - September 10th, 2010, 3:13 pm Post #46 - September 10th, 2010, 3:13 pm
    I've enjoyed the oysters at both Felix's and Acme, and had exceptionally memorable meals at Emeril Lagasse's restaurants Emeril's and Nola. First on my list for my next visit to New Orleans is K-Paul's.
    "Your swimming suit matches your eyes, you hold your nose before diving, loving you has made me bananas!"
  • Post #47 - September 10th, 2010, 3:15 pm
    Post #47 - September 10th, 2010, 3:15 pm Post #47 - September 10th, 2010, 3:15 pm
    Katie wrote:I've enjoyed the oysters at both Felix's and Acme, First on my list for my next visit to New Orleans is K-Paul's.



    K-Paul, Commanders, Felix, and Acme are definites. Felix and Acme probably more than one visit each.
  • Post #48 - September 10th, 2010, 3:26 pm
    Post #48 - September 10th, 2010, 3:26 pm Post #48 - September 10th, 2010, 3:26 pm
    BR wrote:
    stevez wrote:Last I was there, the streetcar didn't run up Carrolton any more. The end of the line was the curve in front of Camilia Grill. It might have changed by now, but I wouldn't count on it.

    It was running up Carrolton Memorial Day weekend so maybe there was simply a temporary closure?


    Yeah, if by "temporary" you mean "for about three years post Katrina".

    After the storm, the National Guard came in with bulldozers to clear all the fallen Live Oak trees which were blocking St. Charles Avenue & Carrollton and they plowed them up onto the streetcar tracks, pretty much destroying them in the process. This, combined with heavy damage to the overhead wires caused by falling limbs, meant that they basically had to completely rebuild the streetcar lines (tracks and wiring) which took some time - a LOT more time than one would think, but they certainly had their hands full. They started with the section between the CBD and Lee Circle, then made it as far out as Napoleon Ave, then to Carrollton, but it seemed to take forever to get that last section between the Riverbend (St. Charles & Carrollton) and Claiborne up and running.
    I exist in Chicago, but I live in New Orleans.
  • Post #49 - September 10th, 2010, 5:11 pm
    Post #49 - September 10th, 2010, 5:11 pm Post #49 - September 10th, 2010, 5:11 pm
    ChiNOLA wrote:
    Ron A. wrote:I would consider adding Brightsen's to the mix for your solo dinner or even an early dinner with your family. I really enjoyed Commander's, but had one of my best meals ever at Brightsen's. IMO, Pascal's Manale was unimpressive and I would not be in a hurry to go back there. On the other hand, Brightsen's would be at or near the top of my list.


    I couldn't agree with you more - Brigtsen's is my favorite restaurant in New Orleans, bar none.

    Pascal's Manale does have an excellent raw bar which I visit with some frequency, but I haven't dined there in years after a few lackluster experiences.


    Thirds on Brightsen's over Pascal Manale's if you are choosing between the two (or any of several other options--I was never a Manale's fan either!!)

    Additionally, I'll throw out there that Acme and Felix's are fun but VERY touristy in my opinion (and VERY crowded at all hours). Cooter Brown's in the garden district (close to the zoo, Camelia Grill and Brightsen's by the way) has oysters just as good, much less expensive and in an atmosphere that, knowing you, you'll enjoy very much. Since you're there for a fair amount of time, I think you will have plenty of time for both the traditional tourist side of NOLA (the quarter), as well as some of the more neighborhood, real NOLA experiences.
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #50 - September 10th, 2010, 8:59 pm
    Post #50 - September 10th, 2010, 8:59 pm Post #50 - September 10th, 2010, 8:59 pm
    Well everyone knows how much I love cooter browns! Give me a fresh shucked dozen, then a Radiator special, Half Shrimp and Half Oyster Po-Boy with melted mixed cheese, dressed, yes that is Heaven. Add in a cold one from the over 400 beer selection and call this place a real gem! Tulane kids partying, biker guys and regular folks watching a game and that is why I love cooters.Yes a real neighborhood joint . However I love the pulse and energy in the Quarter at Felix's and ACME. Standing at either oyster bar having the shuckers talk trash to each other and a few tourists who are piping off, just eating oysters as fast as they can shuck them until you give and can't eat anymore is awful cool as well. So I love both! Jim you love the food already and you will love this trip!
    DB
    Last edited by jhawk1 on September 11th, 2010, 10:07 am, edited 1 time in total.
    Do You Know What It Means To Miss New Orleans?...........Louis Armstrong
  • Post #51 - September 10th, 2010, 9:15 pm
    Post #51 - September 10th, 2010, 9:15 pm Post #51 - September 10th, 2010, 9:15 pm
    The only things I could add are Cassamentos is great. Also you should have at least one drink at the Roosevelt Hotel. I always make at least one stop there.
  • Post #52 - September 13th, 2010, 10:08 am
    Post #52 - September 13th, 2010, 10:08 am Post #52 - September 13th, 2010, 10:08 am
    For anybody that comes searching later . . .

    Cooter Brown's
    509 South Carrollton Avenue
    New Orleans, LA 70118-1005
    (504) 866-9104
    Objects in mirror appear to be losing.
  • Post #53 - September 14th, 2010, 7:32 am
    Post #53 - September 14th, 2010, 7:32 am Post #53 - September 14th, 2010, 7:32 am
    Thanks Kman!
    Do You Know What It Means To Miss New Orleans?...........Louis Armstrong
  • Post #54 - September 16th, 2010, 9:24 am
    Post #54 - September 16th, 2010, 9:24 am Post #54 - September 16th, 2010, 9:24 am
    Had a late lunch at Cochon yesterday, and there are a couple of changes to the menu which are worth mentioning.

    First is the addition of a crabmeat stuffed roasted tomato appetizer, which was excellent.

    Second, they reworked their "rabbit and dumplings" entree. It's now called "smoked rabbit and greens with cornbread dumplings" and is a substantial improvement over the earlier version. It's still served in a small iron skillet, but you can really taste the smokiness of the rabbit, and it has greens, turnips, squash, and onions in it where before it was more of a nondescript cream sauce based prep (kinda like a pot pie). I also prefer the cornbread dumplings to the more plain vanilla ones they used before.

    Also had the "Boss Hog" coctail with moonshine, vodka, and, of all things, fresh watermelon juice. Very refreshing on a hot day.

    Needless to say, Cochon still gets a big thumb's up from me.
    I exist in Chicago, but I live in New Orleans.
  • Post #55 - September 16th, 2010, 4:07 pm
    Post #55 - September 16th, 2010, 4:07 pm Post #55 - September 16th, 2010, 4:07 pm
    stevez wrote:Also, Willa Mae's Scotch House has reopened ; a pilgrimage a fried chicken man such as yourself should make.


    Made my first trip to the much ballyhooed (by national media anyhow) Willie Mae's Scotch House today to try the "best fried chicken in america" according to the Food & Travel Channel and Bon Appetit Magazine. They also won a James Beard Award ("America's Classics") in 2005.

    The first I had heard of Willie Mae's was in one of local writer / author Lolis Eric Elie's columns in the Times Picayune pre-Katrina, but none of my local friends were very high on the place & I never seemed to be able to make it over there during their somewhat restricted hours of 11:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. Willie Mae's is located in the Treme neighborhood & suffered heavy flood damage during Katrina. A bunch of volunteers pitched in to help rebuild the place & they have reopened, now run by Willie Mae's family as she is well into her 90's.

    I figured I might as well go all-in, so I ordered two chicken dinners, one with red beans & rice, the other with french fries. You get three pieces of chicken per dinner for something like $10. The chicken is battered & fried in cast iron skillets (or so I am told) & was, indeed, very good chicken. Excellent crust, not at all greasy. Very solid fried chicken.

    But "the best fried chicken in america"? I dunno. I couldn't even say that it's the best fried chicken in New Orleans (though off the top of my head I can't think of better, I admittedly don't eat much fried chicken down here, there's too much other great stuff on the menu that you really can't find done as well elsewhere).

    It wasn't at the level of being a game-changer for me, the fried chicken against which I will measure all fried chicken from now on, or anything (like the burgers at Tessaro's in Pittsburgh were). I guess I liked it a bit better than, say, Hecky's fried chicken (which, IMHO, is also very good fried chicken), but it's not like it was light years ahead.

    Overall, I'd say Willie Mae's is worth a stop if you're a fried chicken fan visiting New Orleans, but don't expect to be blown away. It's very good chicken, but IMHO doesn't live up to all the hype.
    I exist in Chicago, but I live in New Orleans.
  • Post #56 - September 16th, 2010, 7:01 pm
    Post #56 - September 16th, 2010, 7:01 pm Post #56 - September 16th, 2010, 7:01 pm
    ChiNOLA wrote:It wasn't at the level of being a game-changer for me, the fried chicken against which I will measure all fried chicken from now on
    Never been, but always wanted to go to Willie Mae's Scotch House, happy to hear its solid if not ethereal.

    Speaking of life-changing fried chicken, Chez Helene with Austin Leslie at the helm is my most memorable, good god that was incredible chicken, experience. Chez Helene is long gone, and Austin Leslie passed in 2005, but I will remember both him and his chicken until the moment my time comes.

    My feeble attempt to reproduce Austin Leslie's fried chicken. --> link

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #57 - September 16th, 2010, 7:52 pm
    Post #57 - September 16th, 2010, 7:52 pm Post #57 - September 16th, 2010, 7:52 pm
    I was also not so excited by Willie Mae's, although a friend of mine who joined me there told me that it's not nearly as good as it used to be. In any event, I found better fried chicken in the FQ at Coop's Place, a little hole in the wall with great service, pretty good fried chicken, and some decent gumbo.

    As for muffulettas, I loved the muffuletta at Stein's too, even more so than the well known version at Central Grocery. Johnny's Po-Boys in the FQ makes a pretty nice muffuletta too.

    As for Cochon, if you go and they have the crawfish pie on the menu, I'd say it's a must . . . the best crawfish pie I've ever tasted, and one of the best food items I've ever tasted.

    I've already spoken of Dante's Kitchen in another New Orleans thread, but I just love this casual joint across the street from Brigsten's and around the corner from Camellia Grill - my current favorite in New Orleans. It's also open for brunch.
  • Post #58 - September 17th, 2010, 8:43 am
    Post #58 - September 17th, 2010, 8:43 am Post #58 - September 17th, 2010, 8:43 am
    BR wrote:I was also not so excited by Willie Mae's, although a friend of mine who joined me there told me that it's not nearly as good as it used to be. In any event, I found better fried chicken in the FQ at Coop's Place, a little hole in the wall with great service, pretty good fried chicken, and some decent gumbo.


    Coop's is a place where I was totally surprised at the high quality of the food given the somewhat pedestrian surroundings. Coop's and The Napoleon House are probably my two favorite spots in the French Quarter.

    BR wrote:I've already spoken of Dante's Kitchen in another New Orleans thread, but I just love this casual joint across the street from Brigsten's and around the corner from Camellia Grill - my current favorite in New Orleans. It's also open for brunch.


    I'm friends with Dante's Chef/Owner Eman & have dined there many, many times over the years, usually at least once on each visit. It's a real neighborhood favorite, and a very good value for your dining dollar.
    I exist in Chicago, but I live in New Orleans.
  • Post #59 - September 17th, 2010, 6:49 pm
    Post #59 - September 17th, 2010, 6:49 pm Post #59 - September 17th, 2010, 6:49 pm
    Yet another big day in food town.

    Stopped by longtime favorite Domilise's Poboys & Bar at lunchtime for my usual "off the menu special" shrimp poboy with beef gravy & swiss cheese, dressed. That is one phenomenal sandwich, let me tell ya. Dom's was packed today due to some TV show poboy contest which pitted them against Parkway Bakery (also a fine place, but no match for Dom's, which won the challenge). Barak should have come to Dom's instead of Parkway.

    Domilise's is a MUST for anyone visiting New Orleans who's interested in local flavor. The quintissential neighborhood poboy shop - there are about 7 layers of different colored, worn-through linoleum in front of the sandwich bar, ground down by the feet of the hungry masses over the last 50+ years. A true classic.

    Domilise's Poboys & Bar
    Annunciation & Bellecastle, New Orleans

    For dinner, the one & only Casamento's Restaurant (they just re-opened yesterday after their annual summer-long hiatus)

    Day 2 after the summer break & Casamento's was already firing on all cylinders. Line was out the door. Dozen raw (didn't ask where they got 'em, but there were some huge ones in that dozen, for sure). They absolutely nailed the seafood gumbo today - the best I have ever had there, and I have had many a cup. The classic "oyster loaf" was spot on (hard to beat super fresh oysters, dredged in cornmeal & fried in lard, layered on "pan bread" [white bread sliced very thick & toasted], dressed with mayo, tomato, and iceberg). If it ain't broke, don't fix it - they have been doing things this way since 1919.

    Casamento's Restaurant
    Magazine & Napoleon, New Orleans
    http://www.casamentosrestaurant.com
    I exist in Chicago, but I live in New Orleans.
  • Post #60 - September 24th, 2010, 7:33 pm
    Post #60 - September 24th, 2010, 7:33 pm Post #60 - September 24th, 2010, 7:33 pm
    Just dropping by LTH after a long, long time away and saw this thread about my new hometown. I've been in N.O. since last November, and I'm loving every minute. Read through the suggestions and I have a few to add/subtract.

    Ix-nay on Mandina's. The neighborhood vibe is still the same, but the food has gone downhill.

    Camellia Grill -- all depends on how you feel about standing in line. Unless you go early on the weekend, the line snakes out the door, and IMO, is not worth the wait. It IS a fun experience (unless you or your kind have a low blood sugar meltdown from the wait), but make sure you time it right. Weekday breakfast or pre-noon, post-1 p.m. lunch is best.

    Acme, Felixes...meh. They're conveniently located and serve good food, but Casamento's is definitely the place to go for oysters, softshells and a local feel. They close for the summer, and just reopened about a week or so ago. On a side note, it warms the heart to see an "out-of-towner" (albeit one known for his foodishness) so gung-ho about eating Gulf seafood. Oysters are more expensive at $10-$12/dozen (although still laughably cheap compared to, say, Shaw's) and some restaurants have taken them off the menu because the supply has taken a beating. If you see 'em, eat 'em.

    Willie Mae's is another one I'd take or leave. It's an institution and the chicken is good, but it's not the place I'd send someone with a limited number of meals in town to.

    Commander's over Galatoire's -- the "rowdy downstairs" action is definitely more adult- than kid-friendly, and it's unlikely they'd seat you downstairs with a kid. Tory McPhail at Commander's is a rockstar chef, and you'll never forget the experience of eating there. (Not that this has any bearing on my recommendation, but a funny side note: a gun went off in Galatoire's today -- lady dropped her purse in the foyer of the restaurant, and the gun she was packing went off. Who brings heat to Galatoire's?)

    I have the biggest crush on Cochon Butcher right now. I like Cochon, but if you're having your blow-out, sit-down meals elsewhere, I say go for Butcher. I love their Cuban, if the banh mi is on the menu GET IT, duck pastrami sliders are over-the-top, muffuletta is righteous (although I know some people who think their olive salad is weak)

    If you do end up at the WWII museum, you can hit American Sector (a John Besh restaurant) for lunch.

    I lean to Parkway for po'boys, but po'boys are a religion down here -- everyone has their own belief. The roast beef po'boy at Parasol's is excellent, but there was a recent ownership change and the bar/restaurant is temporarily closed. The guy who ran Parasol's for the last 12 years (and pretty much resurrected the place after years of neglect) just opened a bar/restaurant up the street on Magazine called Tracey's -- same staff, same legendary roast beef po'boy.

    I'm not sure why MiLa at the Pere Marquette Hotel isn't on the radar more, and this might not fit the bill for dinner with the kiddo, but they have a $20, 3-course lunch menu that is outstanding. Dinner is even better. It's nouvelle southern -- the husband/wife chefs are from MS and LA, and they both have impressive resumes/background.

    I seem to remember you're a beer guy. If you find yourself in the Lower Garden District on St. Charles, the Avenue Pub (1732 St. Charles) has a knock-out selection, and the kitchen cranks out seriously good pub eats. (Think: Paramount Room) I ate a duck sammich there the other day, and washed it down with an Octoberfest beer. Tasty.

    And for the kid...while you're strolling around the FQ, take the her to Meltdown Popsicles (508 Dumaine) for a gourmet pop. City Park is a great place to take her, too -- playground, Storyland, little choo-choo ride around the park. And it's on the side of town where Parkway Bakery is. Just sayin'...

    This is usually where I PM a food friend my cell number and offer my bail-out services (as in, 'if you get arrested or you're too drunk to find your way to the hotel, call me'), but I take it the family vacation won't involve such debauchery. I'll send it to you anyway...you never know. :)

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