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Wilson, NC: Mitchell's BBQ closed?

Wilson, NC: Mitchell's BBQ closed?
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  • Wilson, NC: Mitchell's BBQ closed?

    Post #1 - April 24th, 2005, 2:47 pm
    Post #1 - April 24th, 2005, 2:47 pm Post #1 - April 24th, 2005, 2:47 pm
    According to posters on Chowhound South, Ed Mitchell's barbecue in Wilson, NC, has closed. Ed Mitchell is the barbecue chef who was a sensation last summer in NYC at the Big Apple Barbecue Block Party (link) and whom YourPalWill helped out some years ago when Mitchell had bank problems (link).

    The story posted on Chowhound (link) reports that Mitchell lost his business in a high stakes poker game. I don't know what to think of that story, but it's a shame if he's no longer in business.
  • Post #2 - April 24th, 2005, 5:04 pm
    Post #2 - April 24th, 2005, 5:04 pm Post #2 - April 24th, 2005, 5:04 pm
    Well that sucks. I just tried to call and got a fast busy signal. Isn't that the whole hog place featured in season two of A Cook's Tour?
    Unintentionally retired early by the pandemic, but without the golden parachute.
    Formerly Mi Mero Mole
    Formerly Zapapizza
    Formerly Kenny & Zuke's Delicatessen
    Artisan Jewish Deli at Home Cookbook
  • Post #3 - April 24th, 2005, 10:21 pm
    Post #3 - April 24th, 2005, 10:21 pm Post #3 - April 24th, 2005, 10:21 pm
    As those of you who have heard my story from when I was asked to intervene at Ed's place as a result of a troubled bank loan back in the early 90s will recall, I have said often that Ed is a far better barbequer than he is a businessman.

    The statement on Chowhound is true. Bill's Barbeque can't hold a candle to Mitchells. It's a shame.
  • Post #4 - June 3rd, 2005, 2:01 pm
    Post #4 - June 3rd, 2005, 2:01 pm Post #4 - June 3rd, 2005, 2:01 pm
    Here's a link to an article from the Wilson online paper:

    Wilson Online Paper
  • Post #5 - June 3rd, 2005, 9:48 pm
    Post #5 - June 3rd, 2005, 9:48 pm Post #5 - June 3rd, 2005, 9:48 pm
    Today I finally made the connection: I met Ed Mitchell and ate his BBQ at the Southern Foodways Alliance meeting last October. I already knew of the famous encounter with Yourpalwill, I simply didn’t put it altogether. Now I realize I brushed greatness twice and remained blissfully ignorant.

    The very first evening I arrived there was an outdoor BBQ in a former (electric) powerhouse now museum in Oxford, Mississippi. Walked into the parking lot to see a large tractor-trailer with a number of smokers set up along the length of it.

    This is the morning after, which gives an idea of scale:
    Image

    I arrived to find most of the participants milling around drinking cocktails and catching up. By the smokers where the pit masters were working busily was hardly a soul, so I walked to the pits to watch them work and chatted whenever they had a free moment. They gave me a sample of the pulled pork, which was absent a smoke ring. The next day I was on the phone with Gary learning the absence of a smoke ring, which is temperature dependent, does not mean it wasn’t properly prepared.

    Image

    Prior to serving dinner, we were obliged to participate in a pork tasting survey. To fulfill this survey, we were given red, white and blue evaluation sheets, which matched the red, white and blue plates of pulled pork. Each plated sample differed in how the pig was fed primarily during its’ lifetime: 1) Pig taken from a feed lot diet unknown; 2) Pig fed barley/soy and 3) Pig fed barley/corn. I was very interested in whether I would be able to tell the difference. Juggling papers, pulled pork and my purse, I found a place to perch. My first bite concluded the survey very fast: the pork had been dressed in vinegar, which really took away subtle variations we were expected to observe. What really differed from portion to portion was the quantity of vinegar the pit master had used. We were also supposed to evaluate color, which again was impossible due to the party lit mostly by less than full spectrum street lights. The only thing I could potentially respond to was texture, but even that is challenging because much depends on how long it was cooked.

    Pulled Pork
    Image

    Survey aside, I really enjoyed my dinner prepared by the Mitchell BBQ crew. I took a few ribs though I really concentrated on the pulled pork. They had really wonderful sides.

    Creamed spinach on the left and lima beans with fat back.
    Image

    The creamed spinach possessed a spicy kick, which I never encountered before. The lima beans were their lovely mushy selves with a touch of fatty goodness.

    Mashed sweet potatoes topped with praline layer then covered with mini marshmellows.
    Image

    I treated my second portion of sweet potatoes as part of my dessert along with an excellent bread pudding.

    Certainly there was more food at this dinner, these dishes were the highlights.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #6 - June 3rd, 2005, 11:11 pm
    Post #6 - June 3rd, 2005, 11:11 pm Post #6 - June 3rd, 2005, 11:11 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:They gave me a sample of the pulled pork, which was absent a smoke ring. The next day I was on the phone with Gary learning the absence of a smoke ring, which is temperature dependent, does not mean it wasn’t properly prepared.

    Cathy,

    Close, but not exactly, though you're correct in that absence of a smoke ring does not mean BBQ was not properly prepared.

    Smoke ring is temperature dependent only in as much as smoke ring production stops when meat temperature reaches 140°. I am not a scientist, nor do I play one on tv, but the basic idea is the nitrites in the wood smoke interact with the protein in the meat to produce the smoke ring.

    Many factors affect smoke ring, type of cooker and fire source being two. For example, using an offset fire-box type smoker with a slow draft and burning wood will increase smoke ring production, direct cooking with lump charcoal in a cooker with a fast draft, less so. You can also increase smoke ring depth by chilling the meat before putting on the cooker so takes longer to get to 140°.

    Some of the best Barbecue I've ever had the pleasure of eating had little or no smoke ring. This was at Bob in Ga's farm a couple of hours South of Atlanta. The artisanal raised pig was cooked direct over wood burned to coals in a traditional brick pit. Bob, and his wife Ginger are among the few who keep the flames of traditional Barbecue burning.

    For an in depth smoke ring discussion I suggest perusing the Science and Barbecue Section of the BBQ FAQ

    Very nice pictures, made me start thinking of smoking a few racks of spare ribs this weekend.

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #7 - June 4th, 2005, 7:01 am
    Post #7 - June 4th, 2005, 7:01 am Post #7 - June 4th, 2005, 7:01 am
    Gary,

    Thank you for the clarification and education. A year ago, I hardly paid attention to the smoke ring. Now I look for them everywhere!

    Best regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #8 - June 27th, 2005, 6:08 am
    Post #8 - June 27th, 2005, 6:08 am Post #8 - June 27th, 2005, 6:08 am
    Update on story.

    Ed Mitchel Arrested and Charged
    Bruce
    Plenipotentiary
    bruce@bdbbq.com

    Raw meat should NOT have an ingredients list!!
  • Post #9 - February 25th, 2006, 4:12 pm
    Post #9 - February 25th, 2006, 4:12 pm Post #9 - February 25th, 2006, 4:12 pm
    Bruce wrote:Update on story.

    [url=http:///news/story/2539864p-8944150c.html]Ed Mitchel Arrested and Charged[/url]


    This came across a BBQ email list today.

    N.C. Barbecue Legend Sentenced For Felony Tax Charges

    WILSON, N.C. -- North Carolina barbecue legend Ed Mitchell has been sentenced on felony tax charges.

    Mitchell, who owned Mitchell's Ribs, Chicken and Barbecue in Wilson, has been sentenced to 30 days behind bars and three years of supervised probation after pleading guilty to felony tax charges.

    Superior Court Judge Orlando F. Hudson Jr. sentenced Mitchell, suspending three separate sentences.

    Mitchell also paid more than $76,000 in restitution to the Revenue Department before his sentencing.

    Mitchell said the problems stemmed from hiring inexperienced family members to handle bookkeeping.

    He closed his restaurant in March 2005 and plans to reopen in a new location in Wilson.
    Bruce
    Plenipotentiary
    bruce@bdbbq.com

    Raw meat should NOT have an ingredients list!!
  • Post #10 - October 27th, 2007, 9:22 pm
    Post #10 - October 27th, 2007, 9:22 pm Post #10 - October 27th, 2007, 9:22 pm
    Hi,

    I saw Ed Mitchell this evening as well as ate his fine BBQ. According to his business card:

    Ed Mitchell, Pitmaster

    THE PIT Authentic Barbecue
    Main Office: 133 Fayetteville St., Floor 6
    Raleigh, NC 27601

    edmitchell@empire1792.com
    Tel: 919/459-2347

    www.thepit-raleigh.com

    Whole hog * pit cooked

    Everything but the squeal.


    I talked to the people who were working with him to learn Ed Mitchell is their partner. Since Ed seems to have problems negotiating business details, it seems appropriate he stick to cooking. I hope this partnership works well for him.

    Before I had his BBQ, I was enjoying smoked stuffed leg of lamb. After I got Ed's BBQ, I still had thoughts of getting more lamb. Standing in line I was picking at Ed's BBQ finding it smooth, silky and sublime. I walked away from the lamb line, which was good though not fantastic. I got back in line for more of Ed's BBQ. The ladies at my table were simply swooning with every bite.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #11 - January 22nd, 2008, 9:27 pm
    Post #11 - January 22nd, 2008, 9:27 pm Post #11 - January 22nd, 2008, 9:27 pm
    Ed Mitchell is back in business.
    Bruce
    Plenipotentiary
    bruce@bdbbq.com

    Raw meat should NOT have an ingredients list!!
  • Post #12 - May 19th, 2021, 10:38 pm
    Post #12 - May 19th, 2021, 10:38 pm Post #12 - May 19th, 2021, 10:38 pm
    HI,

    Ed Mitchell came up this evening in Adrian Miller's talk on BBQ.

    He has a new business partner: his son, who has worked in finance. Let Ed do the 'cue and his son take care of the business.

    I think this will work out beautifully.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast

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