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Madison, WI Eats?

Madison, WI Eats?
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  • Post #91 - July 29th, 2010, 2:02 pm
    Post #91 - July 29th, 2010, 2:02 pm Post #91 - July 29th, 2010, 2:02 pm
    Me and the family are going to be in Madison for a night between Lake Geneva & The Dells.

    Defintely going to Graze for lunch the first day. This gaztropub looks great

    I am going out solo that night and plan on getting a steak, maybe some oysters, and also some drinks while the wife and daughter hang out at the hotel, and the pool. Places on my list:

    Johnny Delmonico's - anyone been

    also considering: Tornado Club

    who has better steak? (prime, aged)

    It looks like there is quite a bit around that area for after dinner libations but I am interested in any tips.

    Lunch the next day,.. places on the short list are Jamerica & State Street Brats. Looking for simple, inexpensive, kid friendly, some beer, and good. Front runner is Jamerica.

    Any feedback on these, or other spots? I am really not interested in Chinese, Indian, Japanese, etc..
  • Post #92 - July 29th, 2010, 10:51 pm
    Post #92 - July 29th, 2010, 10:51 pm Post #92 - July 29th, 2010, 10:51 pm
    I like state st a lot, especially the red brats. Be warned though that it is very much a college bar. Consider (always) Mickey's Dairy Bar.
    Think Yiddish, Dress British - Advice of Evil Ronnie to me.
  • Post #93 - July 29th, 2010, 11:08 pm
    Post #93 - July 29th, 2010, 11:08 pm Post #93 - July 29th, 2010, 11:08 pm
    jimswside wrote:Me and the family are going to be in Madison for a night between Lake Geneva & The Dells...


    I'll do what I can to help. I have been to the Tornado, and the steak was excellent. I'm not a big steak aficionado, so I can't give any more detail than that. Classy place, but not pretentious. I've never been to Johnny Delmonico's but my friend waited tables there and the food is supposed to be excellent. I think it's a little more swanky/modern. I've heard of several rock star sightings there. Of the two, I'd say Tornado is the "go to" steak place for locals.

    Drinks: Genna's is right next door to Tornado...nice bar, but can get crowded on the weekends (with a slightly older crowd, not undergrads).

    The Great Dane is a local favorite microbrewery and place to hang out on the weekend, and also in the area.

    There's also Magnus, which is a bit more upscale.

    Barrique's is a coffee place/wine bar right off the square that only sells inexpensive boutique wines. Nice place.

    I'll throw out the Greenbush Bar and Le Tigre Lounge as wildcard off-the-Square options.

    Lunch:
    Definitely go with Jamerica over State Street Brats. SSB is more of a beer-soaked sports bar than a place for kids, although I can't remember if Jamerica sells beer.

    The Great Dane might actually be a good option for this. I sent my boss there when she was on a similar trip passing through Madison with her kids and she said they loved it.

    Dotty Dumpling's Dowry is also a good option...lots & lots of burger choices.
  • Post #94 - July 30th, 2010, 12:32 am
    Post #94 - July 30th, 2010, 12:32 am Post #94 - July 30th, 2010, 12:32 am
    Yes, my kids like dotty's a lot too. Nitty gritty is fun, although we like dotty's more. For steaks, I have never been, but smokey's looks appealing in a very old school kinda way.
    Think Yiddish, Dress British - Advice of Evil Ronnie to me.
  • Post #95 - July 30th, 2010, 6:26 am
    Post #95 - July 30th, 2010, 6:26 am Post #95 - July 30th, 2010, 6:26 am
    good tips, thanks folks,

    Smoky's is another spot I printed the menu for.
  • Post #96 - August 6th, 2010, 7:33 pm
    Post #96 - August 6th, 2010, 7:33 pm Post #96 - August 6th, 2010, 7:33 pm
    hope this is helpful.

    http://www.miafrancesca.com/restaurants/lago/index.asp
  • Post #97 - August 16th, 2010, 7:34 pm
    Post #97 - August 16th, 2010, 7:34 pm Post #97 - August 16th, 2010, 7:34 pm
    Was up in Madison for the Great Taste of the Midwest this past weekend. In addition to the beer it allows me to partake in some top notch eats.

    Went to the Brickhouse BBQ for a pre-party on Friday night. Didn't take any pics of the food. We started with the hush puppies. They were very salty and kind of lacking in any other flavor. I had the brisket sandwich and my wife had the pulled pork sandwich. Brisket was pretty bad. No bark, no smoke ring, no smoke flavor, crumbling and overly tender. Pulled pork was decent. Had good smoke flavor, a little bit of bark, but kind of mushy. Fries were standard food service. Coleslaw was pretty good. I liked the sauces, especially the mustard and the vinegar ones.

    Breakfast Saturday morning was at Marigold Kitchen. Duck Confit Hash was the bomb.
    Image

    Spicy cheese bread and sausage sticks from the Farmer's Market made for nice snacking during the fest.

    Dinner Saturday night was at Graze. http://grazepub.com/ It was dark in there so the cellphone pics are shitty.
    Started with the charcuterie plate. L to R Headcheese, Duck Terrine, Pork Pate
    Headcheese and duck terrine were really good. Bread was excellent as well.
    Image
    Wife had fried chicken and waffle. From the couple of bites I got, it was pretty dang good.
    Image
    I had the Moules Frites. Couldn't get a good pic. Was a solid version. Broth was lacking in the flavor and complexity that you expect. Overall a good meal. Felt the place was a little overpriced. Not sure if the menu online is incorrect, or it was just a screw up, but I got charged $16 for the mussels, which is a bit high when compared to places like Hopleaf.

    Sunday brunch at the Old Fashioned.
    Started with an apple fritter. This was the tits. The leftovers were still good this morning.
    Image
    My wife and I each had a burger. I went with the Old Fashioned burger. Burger was overcooked and slightly dry. Way too much sauce. Egg, onions, bacon and cheese went great together. The cheese curds were some of the best I'd ever had. Cheap ass beer was nice as well.
    Image
  • Post #98 - August 17th, 2010, 7:07 am
    Post #98 - August 17th, 2010, 7:07 am Post #98 - August 17th, 2010, 7:07 am
    The apple fritters that they serve at The Old Fashioned are from Green Bush Bakery on Regent Street.
  • Post #99 - August 17th, 2010, 9:04 am
    Post #99 - August 17th, 2010, 9:04 am Post #99 - August 17th, 2010, 9:04 am
    brandon_w wrote:The apple fritters that they serve at The Old Fashioned are from Green Bush Bakery on Regent Street.


    It was really good. I'll have to go directly to the source next time.
  • Post #100 - August 17th, 2010, 2:58 pm
    Post #100 - August 17th, 2010, 2:58 pm Post #100 - August 17th, 2010, 2:58 pm
    Wimperoo, I saw you and your wife Sunday at Old Fashioned! We were inside, near the window. I noticed some people taking food pics...my daughter was especially impressed with the breakfast burger, and now...voila...all makes sense!

    We really enjoyed our breakfast Sunday, best of all, the $1 7 oz taps. I wish they'd open a branch in the Chicago area.
    Think Yiddish, Dress British - Advice of Evil Ronnie to me.
  • Post #101 - August 17th, 2010, 6:29 pm
    Post #101 - August 17th, 2010, 6:29 pm Post #101 - August 17th, 2010, 6:29 pm
    Vital Information wrote:Wimperoo, I saw you and your wife Sunday at Old Fashioned! We were inside, near the window. I noticed some people taking food pics...my daughter was especially impressed with the breakfast burger, and now...voila...all makes sense!

    We really enjoyed our breakfast Sunday, best of all, the $1 7 oz taps. I wish they'd open a branch in the Chicago area.


    Nice. Yeah, the $1 beers were awesome. Even at the regular price of $4 it's a heck of a deal.
  • Post #102 - August 18th, 2010, 1:14 pm
    Post #102 - August 18th, 2010, 1:14 pm Post #102 - August 18th, 2010, 1:14 pm
    We had early dinner (4:30) Sunday 8/15 at The Old Fashioned in preparation of a trip to the Dells the next morning. Just beat the rush. Have to agree that the burger (ordered medium) was served well done, dry, and kind of small. The beef seemed to be of decent quality & had a rich flavor, along with the bacon and cheddar. Great cheese curds & onion strings. My wife had a salad with grilled salmon that met with her approval and she was very happy with it. My kids had the mini-burgers which were very mini and left them hungry, so it required a trip to the ice cream shop at State & Broome. Overall, We'll go back to The Old Fashioned, the service was attentive, the food, other than the burgers, was great, as well as, the pint of Blatz (Grandpa's favorite!) which I have not had in 20 years.
  • Post #103 - August 24th, 2010, 9:11 am
    Post #103 - August 24th, 2010, 9:11 am Post #103 - August 24th, 2010, 9:11 am
    jimswside wrote:good tips, thanks folks,

    Smoky's is another spot I printed the menu for.



    I love Smokeys. Classic, old school steak house. Make sure to get the hash browns.
    Visit my new website at http://www.splatteredpages.com or my old one at www.eatwisconsin.com
  • Post #104 - October 13th, 2010, 6:09 pm
    Post #104 - October 13th, 2010, 6:09 pm Post #104 - October 13th, 2010, 6:09 pm
    I knew better than to darken the door of Ella's Deli at all, but a couple of days after an enjoyable meal at Jake's in Milwaukee, I figured I should experience Ella's at its absolute worst. Ella's makes Carl Buddig look like Langer's. MBS was an old ratty water-logged ball no dog would even want to play with.

    Pastrami @ Ella's:
    Image

    MBS @ Ella's:
    Image
  • Post #105 - October 13th, 2010, 9:55 pm
    Post #105 - October 13th, 2010, 9:55 pm Post #105 - October 13th, 2010, 9:55 pm
    tatterdemalion wrote:I knew better than to darken the door of Ella's Deli at all, but a couple of days after an enjoyable meal at Jake's in Milwaukee, I figured I should experience Ella's at its absolute worst.


    Masochist. But they have trains!

    /Mike G rule invoked
  • Post #106 - October 14th, 2010, 9:20 am
    Post #106 - October 14th, 2010, 9:20 am Post #106 - October 14th, 2010, 9:20 am
    Santander wrote:Masochist. But they have trains!

    /Mike G rule invoked


    Oh I had fun alright. :wink:

    Image
  • Post #107 - October 21st, 2010, 8:15 pm
    Post #107 - October 21st, 2010, 8:15 pm Post #107 - October 21st, 2010, 8:15 pm
    stevez wrote:
    Da Beef wrote:The Stamm House (Middleton)- This place was my favorite spot to dine at in Madison. The feeling and atmosphere of this place during a Friday fish fry was awesome. We tried to make it a monthly ritual to eat here before going out. Great fish fry, amazing onion rings and many cold spotted cow, does it get any better in Wisconsin? Im not sure it does.


    I recently ate at The Stamm House and found the food very underwhelming. The fish was greasy and the batter had no taste. Not only that, but I was the only customer for much of my dinner until another couple came in. Maybe I hit it on a bad night, or maybe it's a place that's past its prime. It certainly is a cool looking place, but I was so disappointed in the food that I didn't even save the pictures I took.


    I'm afraid you didn't hit it on a bad night. I went back here a little while back and it was dead and it was a Friday night at that (ayce fish fry). But the Stamm House still has quite the history behind it. Built in 1847 it served as a store and inn with a tavern for stagecoach travelers along Old Sauk Trail (Minneapolis to Milwaukee). It's also a former stop on the underground railroad during the civil war and then it became a speakeasy during prohibition and reopened legally as a tavern in 1933 and started serving food in 1940 and still stands today.

    Image
    Since 1847

    It was a total different experience than my last visit in between this one which was about five years ago when the house was packed on a similar Friday. We sat at the downstairs bar on this visit and I talked to the bartender who mentioned they now used ocean perch (and said that most places around there do for their frys with the rising cost of lake perch) and he said that aside from the onion rings, not much else is hand breaded anymore. Too bad but still a great place for an authentic old fashioned in a real tavern setting and the best damn onion rings anywhere. Go just for those two and you'll be ok. Although I don't know how many dead Friday nights they can make it thru. Hope it doesn't die.

    Image Image
    Old Fashioned Whiskey Sour at The Stamm House

    The onion rings are hand battered in a light coating and they use red onions which I rarely see. I think these are HOF worthy onion rings.

    Image
    Hand battered rings from Stamm House

    The Stamm House
    6625 Century Ave
    Middleton, WI 53562-2225
    (608) 831-5835
  • Post #108 - October 22nd, 2010, 9:50 am
    Post #108 - October 22nd, 2010, 9:50 am Post #108 - October 22nd, 2010, 9:50 am
    So-called "ocean perch" at a Great Lakes fish fry -- dealbreaker.
  • Post #109 - May 19th, 2011, 7:36 pm
    Post #109 - May 19th, 2011, 7:36 pm Post #109 - May 19th, 2011, 7:36 pm
    In this week's Reader, Mike Sula has a couple of reports about some compelling stuff that's currently going on in Madison . . .

    Madison's Nostrano...
    at the Chicago Reader, Mike Sula wrote:Nearly two years ago Chicago lost two of its best pastry chefs when Tim and Elizabeth Dahl quit their positions—at Blackbird and Boka, respectively—had a kid, and headed north for Madison to open their own place. Capitol Square in Tim's hometown—site of a recent restaurant boomlet—is also the scene of their return to the restaurant world, a "Mediterranean" but largely Italian-leaning casual spot that couldn't be more different from the relatively rarefied environments they left behind.

    at the Chicago Reader, Mike Sula wrote:Returning to his savory roots, Tim is executing a menu that wouldn't look at all out of place back here in Chicago in the context of our own recent superabundance of affordable regional Italian. In Madison it's more sui generis, and well placed to adapt itself to the incredible diversity of meat, cheese, and vegetable producers in southern Wisconsin. It's too early in the growing season to get a clear picture of how that will look in full flower, but on my visit he was serving chicken agnolotti with the season's first ramps and Viola-grown oyster mushrooms, a risotto with house-made salumi, and a butter lettuce salad with candied olives, radishes, and a crumbled blue cheese from nearby Seymour.


    With a restaurant and a charcuterie CSA, Madison's Underground Food Collective is underground no longer...
    at the Chicago Reader, Mike Sula wrote:Every time Garin Fons dreams up a new piece of meat to cure, stuff, or process—say, nduja or goat bacon or pistachio- studded mortadella—he sends the ingredient list and the processing notes to Wisconsin state meat inspectors and waits for the go- ahead. If they don't like something about one of these formulations—say, too many nitrates in the recipe, or a fermentation period that's too long—they reject it.

    "Then we can send them some kind of academic paper or some kind of proof that we think this is a safe step," says Jonny Hunter, 32, Fons's confederate in Madison's Underground Food Collective. "We've had to do that a lot, because the inspectors have never seen anything like this before. We're doing it on a smaller scale, and we're complicated."

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #110 - May 21st, 2011, 7:14 am
    Post #110 - May 21st, 2011, 7:14 am Post #110 - May 21st, 2011, 7:14 am
    Thanks Ronnie,
    I just made a reservation for Nostrano next weekend. I'll report back.
  • Post #111 - May 21st, 2011, 2:22 pm
    Post #111 - May 21st, 2011, 2:22 pm Post #111 - May 21st, 2011, 2:22 pm
    Another newish Madison place I didn't get a chance to report on is Merchant. I wasn't terribly impressed by my brunch there, but a familiar cocktail list devised by Chicago's own Eric Hay--late of Deville, Bangers & Lace, and Duchamp--was executed admirably.

    Merchant
    121 South Pinckney Street
    Madison, WI 53703
    (608) 259-9799
  • Post #112 - May 30th, 2011, 12:46 pm
    Post #112 - May 30th, 2011, 12:46 pm Post #112 - May 30th, 2011, 12:46 pm
    A couple of Madison notes:

    Nostrano is as wonderful as Sula says and Mickies Dairy Bar is as wonderful as everyone says.

    Unfortunately, these two great meals were sandwiched by two mediocre ones. The squash curry at Vientiane Palace was good, but the larb, though nicely offally, was underspiced, underdressed, and just tasted tired. Combine that with the poor rice and somewhat dismal atmosphere, and I think I'll be sticking to Lao Laan-Xang from now on.

    The last meal was the worst, though. We'd planned on Cafe Soleil, not realizing it no longer exists. Looking for an alternative, we walked by The Icon, which seems to have sprouted up during the (thankfully now moribund) tapas craze. I was skeptical but overruled. We should have cut our losses when the "stuffed dates" turned out to be of the cheapo, pitted supermarket variety. These were followed by gritty mussels, warm stuffed peppers over couscous just out of the fridge, and a host of other indignities. Here is yet another kitchen that doesn't know what "duck confit" means (or more likely expects you not to know). Honestly, it really pisses me off that just a few blocks away, the kitchen at Nostrano is cooking at such a high level and not much higher prices -- and yet here is this place churning out crapas for rubes who don't know any better (of whom I am now one).

    Blah. To end on a positive note, Greenbush Bakery does a good job with doughnuts. No waiting in line.
  • Post #113 - May 31st, 2011, 8:33 am
    Post #113 - May 31st, 2011, 8:33 am Post #113 - May 31st, 2011, 8:33 am
    I was always a bit leary of The Icon too, sorry you had to be the Guinea Pig but thanks for sharing your experience here.
    Visit my new website at http://www.splatteredpages.com or my old one at www.eatwisconsin.com
  • Post #114 - May 31st, 2011, 3:55 pm
    Post #114 - May 31st, 2011, 3:55 pm Post #114 - May 31st, 2011, 3:55 pm
    cilantro wrote:Nostrano is as wonderful as Sula says and Mickies Dairy Bar is as wonderful as everyone says.



    Agreed (well, the Nostrano part, Mickies is about the atmosphere to me-the food--eh). We really enjoyed our meal at Nostrano. Thanks for writing about it Mike (and posting Ronnie).

    Lovely little corner spot on the capital square with relaxing, understated decor. The wine list is terrific with interesting with a great selection of wines by the glass and "quartino" (though it must not actually be a quartino as these were more than twice the price of a glass).
    We started with the scallops with braised oxtail appetizer. Not really a logical combo in my mind but it really worked!

    Image

    When we asked for bread, our server let us know that there is a $2 charge for the house made bread. We said that was fine and I'm so glad we did because the house made foccacia is one of the best things I've eaten in a while (and served with excellent olive oil). For entrees/large plates, we shared the harissa paparadelle with lamb ragu, preserved lemon and mint (outstanding) and the braised short rib with cavolo nero (surprisingly, the cavolo nero was the star of that plate--best kale-like preparation I've ever had). The short rib itself was solid but didn't blow me away.
    Image


    We also enjoyed the affogato (salted caramel gelato with a shot of expresso served with cornmeal donuts). Can't wait to try that one at home with David Lebovitz's salted caramel gelato.

    Image

    cilantro wrote:The squash curry at Vientiane Palace was good, but the larb, though nicely offally, was underspiced, underdressed, and just tasted tired. Combine that with the poor rice and somewhat dismal atmosphere, and I think I'll be sticking to Lao Laan-Xang from now on.


    Funny, we ate there too. The squash was excellent as usually, but the wontons were awful this trip. I'm not a huge Lao Laan-Xang fan either so I'll probably stick to eating Thai in Chicago.

    We were less taken with Glarner Stube in New Glarus. Even the roesti didn't do anything for me--the quality of the cheese wasn't that great. The food was o.k. in the 'anything with 3 pounds of cheese is good' kind of way but I definitely wouldn't go back.
    Fondue at Glarner stube (this was a huge cast iron pot--pic doesn't do the portion size justice)

    Image

    Roesti at Glarner Stube

    Image
  • Post #115 - June 1st, 2011, 2:36 pm
    Post #115 - June 1st, 2011, 2:36 pm Post #115 - June 1st, 2011, 2:36 pm
    thaiobsessed wrote:For entrees/large plates, we shared the harissa paparadelle with lamb ragu, preserved lemon and mint (outstanding) and the braised short rib with cavolo nero (surprisingly, the cavolo nero was the star of that plate--best kale-like preparation I've ever had). The short rib itself was solid but didn't blow me away.

    The brodetto was excellent. Highly recommended.
  • Post #116 - June 29th, 2011, 10:48 pm
    Post #116 - June 29th, 2011, 10:48 pm Post #116 - June 29th, 2011, 10:48 pm
    With a restaurant and a charcuterie CSA, Madison's Underground Food Collective is underground no longer...
    at the Chicago Reader, Mike Sula wrote:Every time Garin Fons dreams up a new piece of meat to cure, stuff, or process—say, nduja or goat bacon or pistachio- studded mortadella—he sends the ingredient list and the processing notes to Wisconsin state meat inspectors and waits for the go- ahead. If they don't like something about one of these formulations—say, too many nitrates in the recipe, or a fermentation period that's too long—they reject it.

    "Then we can send them some kind of academic paper or some kind of proof that we think this is a safe step," says Jonny Hunter, 32, Fons's confederate in Madison's Underground Food Collective. "We've had to do that a lot, because the inspectors have never seen anything like this before. We're doing it on a smaller scale, and we're complicated."

    =R=


    Ugh. This place is to be avoided. They opened to muted acclaim and it's been nothing but downhill since then. Service that's indifferent at best mixed with portions that leave patrons in disbelief and quality that's oftentimes "meh". It's just a bad deal, all around.

    I was excited for this place to open (over a year ago), but my impression of it just gets worse with repeated visits. (And of course, comparing notes with friends has yet to have anyone else share a differing opinion.)
    -Pete
  • Post #117 - June 30th, 2011, 10:34 am
    Post #117 - June 30th, 2011, 10:34 am Post #117 - June 30th, 2011, 10:34 am
    We're going up to Madison this weekend for a quick getaway. It looks like the Farmers Market and dinner at Nostrano is in the cards. I'll report back.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #118 - July 5th, 2011, 3:08 pm
    Post #118 - July 5th, 2011, 3:08 pm Post #118 - July 5th, 2011, 3:08 pm
    Pete wrote:
    With a restaurant and a charcuterie CSA, Madison's Underground Food Collective is underground no longer...
    at the Chicago Reader, Mike Sula wrote:Every time Garin Fons dreams up a new piece of meat to cure, stuff, or process—say, nduja or goat bacon or pistachio- studded mortadella—he sends the ingredient list and the processing notes to Wisconsin state meat inspectors and waits for the go- ahead. If they don't like something about one of these formulations—say, too many nitrates in the recipe, or a fermentation period that's too long—they reject it.

    "Then we can send them some kind of academic paper or some kind of proof that we think this is a safe step," says Jonny Hunter, 32, Fons's confederate in Madison's Underground Food Collective. "We've had to do that a lot, because the inspectors have never seen anything like this before. We're doing it on a smaller scale, and we're complicated."

    =R=


    Ugh. This place is to be avoided. They opened to muted acclaim and it's been nothing but downhill since then. Service that's indifferent at best mixed with portions that leave patrons in disbelief and quality that's oftentimes "meh". It's just a bad deal, all around.

    I was excited for this place to open (over a year ago), but my impression of it just gets worse with repeated visits. (And of course, comparing notes with friends has yet to have anyone else share a differing opinion.)


    Apparently they are temporarily closed due to a June 30 fire that heavily damaged the building.

    http://www.jsonline.com/blogs/entertain ... 01874.html
    Visit my new website at http://www.splatteredpages.com or my old one at www.eatwisconsin.com
  • Post #119 - July 28th, 2011, 9:55 pm
    Post #119 - July 28th, 2011, 9:55 pm Post #119 - July 28th, 2011, 9:55 pm
    A quick report on a day trip to Madison:

    We stopped at Mickie's Dairy Bar for lunch. Yup, classic old diner with red stools and charming old timey signs on the wall. Unfortunately, the griddle cakes were dense belly bombs (I blame the oatmeal in the batter). I liked the corned beef hash, but be forewarned it was more fried potatoes with bits of corned beef. My lunchmate said the omelette was okay.

    We stopped at Taste of Tibet for an early dinner and ordered the ginger yak meatball special and the vegetable moma numtak appetizer. Our server told us the yak is from a family farm in Green Bay. It was lean with a well-balanced ginger sauce. The moma were nicely herbaceous, served with a sort of cocktail sauce. The dinnermate asked about the cocktail sauce and was told that Tibetan food is generally not spicy (and neither was this sauce). All in all, a tasty little dinner, and filling enough after the enormous portions at Mickie's.

    Last meal - "cave bacon" at Cave of the Mounds. https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/wiki/Flowstone More of a visual treat. :lol:

    Taste of Tibet
    Phone: 608-250-2363
    430 State Street
    Madison WI 53703
    http://tasteoftibet.net/index.html
    Last edited by lemoneater on August 9th, 2011, 6:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.
    "To get long" meant to make do, to make well of whatever we had; it was about having a long view, which was endurance, and a long heart, which was hope.
    - Fae Myenne Ng, Bone
  • Post #120 - July 29th, 2011, 10:13 am
    Post #120 - July 29th, 2011, 10:13 am Post #120 - July 29th, 2011, 10:13 am
    stevez wrote:We're going up to Madison this weekend for a quick getaway. It looks like the Farmers Market and dinner at Nostrano is in the cards. I'll report back.


    Did you end up eating at Nostrano? Wife and I are going up to Madison in a couple of weeks for the Great Taste. We were thinking about Nostrano for dinner on the Friday night.

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