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Corona cuisine / Social distancing cooking
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  • Post #841 - June 25th, 2020, 8:05 am
    Post #841 - June 25th, 2020, 8:05 am Post #841 - June 25th, 2020, 8:05 am
    jlawrence01 wrote:I opened up a container of palm sugar from Thailand. It is one solid brick and I have been unable to break past the surface. Any ideas besides chucking it??

    Typically, it is grated. The fine grating blades of a food processor can work, just don't push very hard.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #842 - June 25th, 2020, 8:12 am
    Post #842 - June 25th, 2020, 8:12 am Post #842 - June 25th, 2020, 8:12 am
    HI,

    I use the microwave to soften brown sugar, maybe this could work, too?

    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #843 - June 25th, 2020, 8:23 am
    Post #843 - June 25th, 2020, 8:23 am Post #843 - June 25th, 2020, 8:23 am
    JoelF wrote:Typically, it is grated. The fine grating blades of a food processor can work, just don't push very hard.

    Also, a wee bit of water then a short turn in the microwave. If you can get a smallish chunk out mortar & pestle works well. Or, just go full on Gallagher on its ass!

    Image
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #844 - June 25th, 2020, 12:14 pm
    Post #844 - June 25th, 2020, 12:14 pm Post #844 - June 25th, 2020, 12:14 pm
    jlawrence01 wrote:I opened up a container of palm sugar from Thailand. It is one solid brick and I have been unable to break past the surface. Any ideas besides chucking it??

    If it came in a jar and you haven't used it before, there's probably a layer of wax on top that you'll need to get rid of. After that, yeah, microwave should work.
  • Post #845 - June 25th, 2020, 5:44 pm
    Post #845 - June 25th, 2020, 5:44 pm Post #845 - June 25th, 2020, 5:44 pm
    Man there's a lot of good-looking food in this thread. You guys have been killing it!

    The other day, I made cha siu pork to use for a dumb idea I had for my dumb website. I made it with pork butt. Since the basic unit of pork butt is an 8-9 pound bone-in butt, I made kind of a lot of it. After removing the blade bone and cutting it into roughly even strips, I ended up with 6 hunks of 1-1.5 each, like so:

    Image

    As a result, we've been looking for ways to use it up for the past 2 days. We've had it for breakfast and lunch and dinner. For tonight's dinner, I made some simple crepe-like pancakes, and we had the sliced cha siu wrapped in them with a little extra sauce, garnished with sliced cucumbers and scallions.

    Image

    Oh man was this good!
    Ronnie said I should probably tell you guys about my website so

    Hey I have a website.
    http://www.sandwichtribunal.com
  • Post #846 - June 25th, 2020, 7:12 pm
    Post #846 - June 25th, 2020, 7:12 pm Post #846 - June 25th, 2020, 7:12 pm
    Image
    Smash & Fry Fingerling Potatoes
    I didn't think I'd be making these again this soon but a bag of fingerlings showed up in our Nichols Farm CSA box, so we put it to good use. This time, instead of simmering the potatoes in water first, we cooked them in the Instant Pot (6 minutes) and let them cool before I smashed them. After that, I fried them in peanut oil. With less moisture in the potatoes, they came out crispier than on previous attempts, and were quite delicious.

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    Wedge Salad w/Greenhouse Tomatoes and Blue Cheese Dressing
    These greenhouse tomatoes, also from Nichols Farm, were so good, I'm damned near a convert. Tomato snobbery be damned!

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    Dinner Time
    Grilled Chicken Thigh, Jalapeno-Cheddar Sausage (of unknown origin) and Fingerling Potatoes. I wasn't planning on cooking any sausage but the fire on the Weber was so perfect, I had to put something else on after the chicken came off. I found these -- vacuum-sealed and unmarked -- in the back of the fridge and grilled them up. Unfortunately they were pretty weak but the rest of the meal was top-notch.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #847 - June 25th, 2020, 7:24 pm
    Post #847 - June 25th, 2020, 7:24 pm Post #847 - June 25th, 2020, 7:24 pm
    JimTheBeerGuy wrote:The other day, I made cha siu pork to use for a dumb idea I had for my dumb website.

    LOL - neither the idea nor the website are dumb. :D :lol:

    JimTheBeerGuy wrote:Oh man was this good!

    That seems clear from the pics. Stunning! Any recipes for the pork or the pancake that you can share?

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #848 - June 25th, 2020, 7:49 pm
    Post #848 - June 25th, 2020, 7:49 pm Post #848 - June 25th, 2020, 7:49 pm
    ronnie_suburban wrote:
    JimTheBeerGuy wrote:Oh man was this good!

    That seems clear from the pics. Stunning! Any recipes for the pork or the pancake that you can share?

    =R=


    Hi Ronnie! The char siu pork recipe came from a site that's steered me right on a few occasions called The Woks Of Life: https://thewoksoflife.com/chinese-bbq-pork-cha-siu/

    And I found the pancake recipe just searching for things to do with leftover char siu pork. It's on food.com, which is hit or miss for me. I thought this was great, but I wonder if I could find an even better pancake recipe to use with the same basic concept. https://www.food.com/recipe/char-siu-pork-pancakes-345416
    Ronnie said I should probably tell you guys about my website so

    Hey I have a website.
    http://www.sandwichtribunal.com
  • Post #849 - June 26th, 2020, 7:48 am
    Post #849 - June 26th, 2020, 7:48 am Post #849 - June 26th, 2020, 7:48 am
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Got the crazy idea that I could use up a bunch of items by making stuffed cabbage rolls, which I'd never done before . . .

    Image
    Filling
    Ground pork and beef, onion, garlic, assorted seasonings. Rendered the meat, then cooked the other ingredients until they were translucent and aromatic. Added some cooked rice. Beaten egg added later (and I should have used two).

    Image
    Blanching The Napa Cabbage
    Once softened enough for rolling, they went from here into an ice water bath.

    Image
    Rolling The Cabbage
    This worked out well, though, as I mentioned above, I should have probably used two eggs instead of just one. I could have blanched the cabbage a bit longer, too. It would have also been helpful if I'd blanched a few (or even several) extra cabbage leaves, in case of holes, breakage, user error, etc.

    Image
    Cabbage Rolls
    They rolled up pretty cooperatively. Again, I should have had a few extra leaves ready to cover gaps, etc. But yeah, 11 rolls. Umm . . . I meant to do that. :P

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    In The Sauce
    After the filling had cooked, I deglazed the pot with some red wine and made a cooking medium, adding whole canned tomatoes, onion, garlic, a sprig of fresh oregano and a dash of sugar. Covered this and cooked them for an hour at 325F.

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    Plated Up
    A lot of steps but in the end, really worth it. All the steam made a decent picture difficult to acquire. These were delicious and I got rid of two pounds of ground meat, most of a napa cabbage, two onions, an open bottle of wine and a few other ingredients in the process.

    =R=


    This is how my grandfather made cabbage rolls. Brings back good memories....thanks
  • Post #850 - June 26th, 2020, 8:41 am
    Post #850 - June 26th, 2020, 8:41 am Post #850 - June 26th, 2020, 8:41 am
    PreFlopRaise13 wrote:
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Got the crazy idea that I could use up a bunch of items by making stuffed cabbage rolls, which I'd never done before . . .

    This is how my grandfather made cabbage rolls. Brings back good memories....thanks

    That's cool. Food memories are incredibly powerful. Even though I grew up with my paternal grandmother making these regularly, my 23-year-old son had never had stuffed cabbage before.

    He posted one of these pics on some social media outlet and got a few responses similar to yours. It made me a bit sad that I never bothered to get my grandma's actual recipe (I was too cool for school back then) and that my son and I didn't share the same food memories. What I served him was fine but it was nothing like what I grew up eating. I'll probably keep at this and see if I can come up with a closer approximation.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #851 - June 27th, 2020, 11:45 am
    Post #851 - June 27th, 2020, 11:45 am Post #851 - June 27th, 2020, 11:45 am
    Finishing up my most recent pot of beans, Azufrados from Rancho Gordo, with a couple of over-easy eggs. Garnished with chives and cotija . . .

    Image
    Azufrado Beans & Eggs

    A delicious, filling, hearty breakfast. :)

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #852 - June 27th, 2020, 9:27 pm
    Post #852 - June 27th, 2020, 9:27 pm Post #852 - June 27th, 2020, 9:27 pm
    Warm night, Weber kettle, neighbors, wine and meat. Nice evening for the 80th month of stay at home or die in 2020.

    Image
    Image
    Image Image
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #853 - June 27th, 2020, 10:59 pm
    Post #853 - June 27th, 2020, 10:59 pm Post #853 - June 27th, 2020, 10:59 pm
    G Wiv wrote:Warm night, Weber kettle, neighbors, wine and meat. Nice evening for the 80th month of stay at home or die in 2020.

    Hell yeah - beautiful spread! And yeah, it's funny because it's (mostly) true. :D

    I had some frozen shrimp that were not suitable for a simple prep so decided to make Shrimp Ball Miso Soup . . .

    Image
    Proteins
    Shrimp, cod and a couple slices of bacon. One of the recipes I looked at called for pork belly, and the need for extra fat made sense to me. But on this particular day, bacon was as close as I could get. It worked out fine.

    Image
    Shrimp & Large Takeda Stainless-Clad Deba
    To provide textural variation in the final product, some of the shrimp (~120g) needed to be coarsely chopped. And ultimately, the shrimp ball mixture needed to be kept as cold as possible to offset the heat caused by the extended run in the food processor. So, I used some frozen shrimp and the ultra-tough deba allowed me to mince up the frozen shrimp pretty easily.

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    Shrimp Ball Premix
    About 450g of shrimp, cod and bacon ready for processing. This does not include the 120g of coarsely chopped shrimp that I'd mix in by hand later.

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    Shrimp Ball Mixture
    After a few minutes, the mixture reaches a pasty, almost-emulsified state. From here, I mixed in by hand the 120g of coarsely chopped shrimp and a slurry of garlic, ginger, fish sauce, salt, white pepper, sugar, sherry and corn starch.

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    Cooking Medium
    Many of the recipes I looked at called for poaching in water but I thought that was a missed opportunity, so I made a "broth" using charred onions, garlic and ginger. Here, my induction burner is set to 180F.

    Image
    Forming The Balls
    In the end, I think my mixture was a bit too loose, so instead of being able to hand-form balls, I went at them "quenelle-style." Because the mixture was so loose, the resulting shrimp balls were incredibly light and tender in texture, which was a good thing. And because I am terrible at making quenelles, the balls actually ended up being amorphous blobs (as you will see below).

    Image
    Shrimp Balls Poaching
    Once the last ball was formed and dropped, I moved the pot to the stove top, turned the heat up to high and let it go until it started boiling, after which I immediately removed the balls from the liquid.

    Image
    Shrimp Balls
    I believe I count 25. Again, what they lacked in sphericalness (I don't think that's really a word), they made up for in textural lightness. A rookie effort for sure but totally acceptable.

    Image
    Shrimp Ball Miso Soup, Bowl #1
    For the actual soup, I also made my own dashi (water, kombu, bonito flakes) and parlayed that into homemade miso soup (dashi, miso - sorry, no pics of these phases). I constructed each serving with 75% of the miso soup, 25% of the poaching liquid. This bowl is garnished with homemade chili oil (G Wiv recipe, of course), scallions, chives, shredded napa cabbage and minced up, toasted nori.

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    Shrimp Ball Miso Soup, Bowl #2
    So nice, I did it twice. :P :lol:

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #854 - June 28th, 2020, 6:10 am
    Post #854 - June 28th, 2020, 6:10 am Post #854 - June 28th, 2020, 6:10 am
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Shrimp Ball Miso Soup, Bowl #2
    So nice, I did it twice. :P :lol:

    Beautiful, count your Shrimp Ball Miso Soup among the few things I've seen, entire internet not just LTH, that make me glad I surf the web from a fainting couch!

    Its funny, as shelter in place goes endlessly on your (glorious) home cooked meals seem to be getting increasingly complex as mine are veering toward simpler.

    I did make a couple of large quesadillas last night, not pictured in my post, with avocado, homemade refried pintos and fresh shredded cheese, that turned out crispy and delicious. Served with a side of black beans and amped up sour cream. Plus two separate marinades for the chicken and pork, home made giardiniera/mustard for the brats.

    I get the feeling as time goes on, I will be scoffed at for not casing my own brats, baking my own buns and raising backyard chickens. :)

    By the way, your balls looked just fine to me. Far as lacking in sphericalness, remember you are no longer a kid ;)
    Last edited by G Wiv on June 28th, 2020, 8:00 am, edited 1 time in total.
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #855 - June 28th, 2020, 6:56 am
    Post #855 - June 28th, 2020, 6:56 am Post #855 - June 28th, 2020, 6:56 am
    Image

    Bone in thighs on lump with a piece of pecan added. They are marinated in a rub that is supposedly Peruvian and top with a sauce after cooking: https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/201 ... ecipe.html
    This is one of our favorite ways to cook chicken and we regularly make it this way. We do whole chickens as the recipe call for, bone-in thighs as we did last night and boneless thighs served on english muffin with mashed avacado, thin sliced shallots and the same sauce. The boneless is done on the stovetop rather than the grill.
  • Post #856 - June 28th, 2020, 11:37 am
    Post #856 - June 28th, 2020, 11:37 am Post #856 - June 28th, 2020, 11:37 am
    G Wiv wrote:
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Shrimp Ball Miso Soup, Bowl #2
    So nice, I did it twice. :P :lol:

    Its funny, as shelter in place goes endlessly on your (glorious) home cooked meals seem to be getting increasingly complex as mine are veering toward simpler.

    I can't remember where I first heard it but someone said that half of cooking is thinking about cooking. And being mostly stuck at home for the past 413+ weeks, I've been thinking about cooking a lot. So, when the inclination hits to try something (new), I do what I can to make it happen, even if it requires a bit of advance planning, and using every pot and pan in the kitchen. In yesterday's case, I had everything in place (mostly pantry and some freezer) but the kombu I ordered was delayed, so I was lucky I was able to borrow some from a friend.

    G Wiv wrote:I did make a couple of large quesadillas last night, not pictured in my post, with avocado, homemade refried pintos and fresh shredded cheese, that turned out crispy and delicious. Served with a side of black beans and amped up sour cream. Plus two separate marinades for the chicken and pork, home made giardiniera/mustard for the brats.

    I get the feeling as time goes on, I will be scoffed at for not casing my own brats, baking my own buns and raising backyard chickens. :)

    The quesadillas sound great. No scoffing from here and I really hope it never comes to that from anyone. People should just cook what and when they want, or not at all. I'm using cooking as a way to stay focused and sane while being stuck at home. And I love the idea of coming out of this mess with some additional arrows in my culinary quiver. I've learned a lot of new things as this has dragged on. It started with cooking what was on-hand and available. Now, as many grocery items have reappeared, I've been able to plot my own course more frequently. But on the days I'm not in the mood to cook, I don't do it. I'm fortunate that I've maintained my love of cooking by only cooking when I want to, not because I have to.

    lougord99 wrote:This is one of our favorite ways to cook chicken . . .

    Ours, too. In fact, if I didn't know otherwise, the picture you posted could have been taken at our house. The thighs look great! :)

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #857 - June 28th, 2020, 1:53 pm
    Post #857 - June 28th, 2020, 1:53 pm Post #857 - June 28th, 2020, 1:53 pm
    I'm not a huge fan of waffles or sweet breakfasts in general. As it turns out, neither is my family. Nonetheless, it's nice to know our waffle iron still works after being idle for at least 15 years . . .

    Image
    Buttermilk Waffles
    Recipe from the Joy Of Cooking (© 1975). The highlight here was the Brick Chapel NY State maple syrup, which was given to me by kalamazoogal. It definitely made the waffle worth eating! And, as desserts go, the waffle was delicious. :D

    I then made a breakfast that was more up my alley . . .

    Image
    Hot Dog & Multi-Cheese Omelet w/Buttercrust White Toast

    This was going to be a scramble but I left it unattended in the pan for too long while I fussed with the toast, so I decided to omeletize it instead.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #858 - June 28th, 2020, 8:53 pm
    Post #858 - June 28th, 2020, 8:53 pm Post #858 - June 28th, 2020, 8:53 pm
    HI,

    Sunday morning has become my new shopping time.

    I left the house with intentions to buy another fish to try out. I forgot my cooler at home and did not want melting ice all over the place.

    I did buy some ground lamb for a cookbook club recipe. I bought only 1.5 pounds, then realized this lamb might work for the 4th of July. I put aside 0.75 pound for cevapcici and added 0.25 ground beef to round off what I needed for this recipe.

    My sister does not like lamb. Rather than watch her flip food around her plate, I aimed to make Sloppy Joe's. When she declared she was not joining us, then we switched to Oklahoma onion burgers.

    At Woodman's, I always check the reduced price produce. Today, there were a dozen perfectly ripe (and about to go downhill) avocados for 99 cents. There was at least two pounds of broccoli crowns for 99 cents, too. We ate half the avocados before lunch just scooping out with a spoon. I made broccoli salad with dried cranberries and sunflower seeds purchased before the shutdown in March.

    Just before bed, we had raspberries and whipped cream.

    When it comes to menu planning, I am so flexible I often surprise myself.

    I am not looking forward to this week's weather.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #859 - June 28th, 2020, 9:15 pm
    Post #859 - June 28th, 2020, 9:15 pm Post #859 - June 28th, 2020, 9:15 pm
    Smoothie. Mango, banana, orange, Le Croix, Gatorade, ice, blend. Surprisingly tasty for such a mishmash.

    Image

    Smoothie, count me a Fan!
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #860 - June 28th, 2020, 10:15 pm
    Post #860 - June 28th, 2020, 10:15 pm Post #860 - June 28th, 2020, 10:15 pm
    G Wiv wrote:Smoothie. Mango, banana, orange, Le Croix, Gatorade, ice, blend. Surprisingly tasty for such a mishmash.

    What flavor La Croix? Did the carbonation hold up post-blend? Looks very refreshing!

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #861 - June 29th, 2020, 12:55 am
    Post #861 - June 29th, 2020, 12:55 am Post #861 - June 29th, 2020, 12:55 am
    ronnie_suburban wrote:What flavor La Croix? Did the carbonation hold up post-blend? Looks very refreshing!

    La Croix Pamplemousse, I'm a Pamplemousse kind of guy.
    Carbonation held surprisingly well.

    Tasty and refreshing, I was surprised at balance of flavor considering all the disparate items tossed in with no thought to how they would coincide. Fruit Punch Gatorade being the outlier.

    I'm guessing the smoothie was saved by the fact I used real, actual, fruit and had a high power blender to fracture the ice.

    I keep thinking I should drink more smoothies and eat fewer Joseph's spicy sausage sticks. Maybe this is a start. :)
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #862 - June 29th, 2020, 10:22 am
    Post #862 - June 29th, 2020, 10:22 am Post #862 - June 29th, 2020, 10:22 am
    I have seen some amazing looking meals posted to this thread clearly using restaurant quality ingredients and wonder if anyone has broken down the cost of making such a meal vs going out to the restaurant. I mean it is fun to go out and be served but it is also nice to be at home and enjoy a meal with the family right? I mean how much is that worth? I think that depends on the family for sure :lol:

    Anyway my uneducated guess is that it isn't that much difference in cost and so it comes down to the safety and convenience of being at home vs the risk of going out and what that offers. Or am I wrong, is it much cheaper to cook with those ingredients then eat at a restaurant? There is no point here, just curiosity from an envious non chef.

    Relating to that I wonder if the ultra expensive restaurants will be the true survivors in the end, because they offer something totally unique that cannot be replicated at home. Maybe we will end up with the restaurant business mirroring our society, inexpensive and ultra expensive, ie lower and upper class, with little in the middle besides cloud kitchens and boxed prepared meals. Hope not and sorry for the rambling.
  • Post #863 - June 29th, 2020, 11:38 am
    Post #863 - June 29th, 2020, 11:38 am Post #863 - June 29th, 2020, 11:38 am
    JP1121 wrote:Anyway my uneducated guess is that it isn't that much difference in cost and so it comes down to the safety and convenience of being at home vs the risk of going out and what that offers. Or am I wrong, is it much cheaper to cook with those ingredients then eat at a restaurant? There is no point here, just curiosity from an envious non chef.
    .


    I cannot speak for anyone else but I will say this. I live in Southern Arizona where the average restaurant price for a meal is 25% less than the Chicagoland area on average and the grocery prices are 5-10% higher.

    Cooking at home is significantly less costly that eating out. A lot of the ingredients in the above photos are actually not that expensive. For example, pork butt is $0.98/lb, eggs are $1.50 per dozen and the like.

    Prior to Covid-19, on months that we were NOT traveling, we have been spending about $190 per month for food for two and $235 per month on eating out. In the past three months, we have been spending about $275 per month on groceries and nothing eating out. The savings is significant and a lot more than I had expected. That is despite the fact that when we eat out, we don't drink alcohol or soft drinks and the bulk of our spend is at quick service places like El Pollo Loco that don't have tipping.

    Note that part of the increase in grocery cost can be attributed to two factors. First, prices this year are higher, especially meat prices. Second, because we order all of our food online, we are purchasing all of our groceries at places with free order pick up like Frys (Krogers) and Walmart. That means we lose out on MANY good deals available at smaller markets. We miss out on the bargain bins and markdowns. We miss out on the bakery outlets. We miss out on the deals at the 99 Only stores, the small ethnic markets. We miss out on some of the digital deals and coupons that we could normally utilize.

    We prepare all of our meals from scratch other than an occasional frozen pot pie or burrito. Meal prep takes about 30-45 minutes a day excluding the baking which I do not do.

    I expect my grocery bill to increase to $300 per month going forward due to price increases. However, once this is over with, it will be closer to $250 without eating out.
  • Post #864 - June 29th, 2020, 3:32 pm
    Post #864 - June 29th, 2020, 3:32 pm Post #864 - June 29th, 2020, 3:32 pm
    JP1121 wrote:Anyway my uneducated guess is that it isn't that much difference in cost and so it comes down to the safety and convenience of being at home vs the risk of going out and what that offers. Or am I wrong, is it much cheaper to cook with those ingredients then eat at a restaurant? There is no point here, just curiosity from an envious non chef.

    It is absolutely significantly less costly to make any restaurant meal at home with the most expensive ingredients you can find than the same meal at the restaurant.

    That is obvious on its face, plus I can vouch for it.

    Certainly restaurants can buy ingredients SOMEWHAT cheaper than we can. That does not overcome the overhead, time, profit and anything else a restaurant tacks on to a meal.
  • Post #865 - June 30th, 2020, 10:19 am
    Post #865 - June 30th, 2020, 10:19 am Post #865 - June 30th, 2020, 10:19 am
    With the exception of a very time-consuming side dish, it was a simple and quick dinner last night . . .

    Image
    Pan-Seared Boneless Skinless Chicken Thighs
    I'd planned to use these more imaginatively but they were at the 'freeze or use' point yesterday and the favas took up almost all of the cooking time time I had available. With the chicken are some sauteed creminis, a piece of buttered toast from a Hewn Bakery boule, the still-never-ending purple cabbage, some leftover morels and the infamous favas. Harrrumph!

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #866 - June 30th, 2020, 10:42 am
    Post #866 - June 30th, 2020, 10:42 am Post #866 - June 30th, 2020, 10:42 am
    Ronnie. Nicely presented plate. Sparkling water and knife in background. LTHForum image musts. Only issue I have is not enough knife in pic. I loves me some Ronnie_S cutlery. :)
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #867 - June 30th, 2020, 10:52 am
    Post #867 - June 30th, 2020, 10:52 am Post #867 - June 30th, 2020, 10:52 am
    G Wiv wrote:Ronnie. Nicely presented plate. Sparkling water and knife in background. LTHForum image musts. Only issue I have is not enough knife in pic. I loves me some Ronnie_S cutlery. :)

    Well, I did prepare a garnish . . . :D

    Image
    Gratuitous Prep Shot
    Konosuke SKD Tsuchime Gyuto, 210mm & Chives

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #868 - June 30th, 2020, 4:05 pm
    Post #868 - June 30th, 2020, 4:05 pm Post #868 - June 30th, 2020, 4:05 pm
    Ronnie,


    I have knife envy.
  • Post #869 - June 30th, 2020, 10:43 pm
    Post #869 - June 30th, 2020, 10:43 pm Post #869 - June 30th, 2020, 10:43 pm
    Took another swing at the remaining slab of A-5 tonight, with much better results than last time. Started out by prepping for the quinoa . . .

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    Knob Onions
    From Three Sisters Garden

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    Knob Onions & Kono SKD Tsuchime, 210mm
    I've been enjoying this knife a lot lately. The profile is an excellent match for my natural motion. I love its weight, and it's beautiful, too.

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    Sauteed
    First the whites, then the greens.

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    A-5 Miyazaki Wagyu
    The end of strip loin I split with my friends a couple weeks back. The vacuum sealer did its job and I did mine, managing to get the beef properly butchered for efficient cooking this time around.

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    Sear, Side One
    Just salt on the beef. I didn't expect it to stick but I swabbed the hot pan with a chunk of trimmed fat before I cooked the meat, just in case.

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    Sear, Side Two
    Probably about 1 minute per side.

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    Ready To Serve
    I didn't want to hold it long but it needed to rest for a moment and I had one other component I wanted to add . . .

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    Spanish Onion
    I couldn't possibly waste that delicious rendered fat, so I sliced up an onion and cooked it hot and fast while the beef rested.

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    Sauteed Spanish Onion
    Absolutely worth the 3 minutes it took from start to finish.

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    Plated Up
    With quinoa (knob onions, leftover sauteed creminis & the notorious fava beans), the finally-finished purple cabbage (yay!) and the sauteed Spanish onion.

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    Money Shot
    Happy that I managed Round 2 much better than Round 1. Btw, those Daovua leaf spring steak knives (made in Vietnam) are a lot of fun to use. :D
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #870 - July 1st, 2020, 7:09 pm
    Post #870 - July 1st, 2020, 7:09 pm Post #870 - July 1st, 2020, 7:09 pm
    With apologies to all the purists, it was clean-out-the-fridge Fried "Riced" Cauliflower once again tonight . . .

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    Mise
    Well, most of it, anyway. In addition to the self-explanatory items, there are some leftover sauteed creminis and a cut-up leftover sausage I grilled the other night. I love these shelled peas because they're nice and firm and remain perfectly taut even after they're cooked. :D

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    Not-So-Secret Ingredient
    G Wiv-recipe Chili Oil. And yes, that is a half-gallon Ball jar! :D

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    Spam
    The featured ingredient and my Shibata Kashima R-2 Gyuto (210mm). While it probably was a bit of overkill for the Spam, I love this R-2 knife because it's got a tough, long-lasting edge and the fact that it's stainless means I can be a little more casual with it in the kitchen. It also did a very nice job on the carrots and scallions.

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    Plated Up
    Two ladles of chili oil in the wok gave this batch just the right kick.

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    Salad
    Greens and tomatoes from Nichols Farm. I can't believe I'm saying this (again) but these greenhouse tomatoes from Nichols are really good. I've actually been enjoying them, not just tolerating them.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain

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