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Lamb Shoulder
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  • Lamb Shoulder

    Post #1 - May 29th, 2019, 3:08 pm
    Post #1 - May 29th, 2019, 3:08 pm Post #1 - May 29th, 2019, 3:08 pm
    Hi all,

    I am in charge of food for a 30+ person event in February with limited help in the kitchen. I was thinking of doing some lamb shoulder but wondering where the best resource might be for this cut especially given that it will be during the winter. I was hoping to try some different variations out before the main event but ultimately I am going to need to be able to buy it in Jan/Feb as well. Any suggestions?
    “There are people in the world so hungry, that God cannot appear to them except in the form of bread.”
    ― Mahatma Gandhi
  • Post #2 - May 29th, 2019, 3:13 pm
    Post #2 - May 29th, 2019, 3:13 pm Post #2 - May 29th, 2019, 3:13 pm
    Paulina Meat Market sounds like a good bet, though I'd also try talking to a halal butcher because they are likely dealing with lamb more than anyone else in the city.
  • Post #3 - May 29th, 2019, 3:26 pm
    Post #3 - May 29th, 2019, 3:26 pm Post #3 - May 29th, 2019, 3:26 pm
    Nea Agora on Taylor?
  • Post #4 - May 30th, 2019, 5:09 am
    Post #4 - May 30th, 2019, 5:09 am Post #4 - May 30th, 2019, 5:09 am
    Fresh Farms on Touhy will take care of you quite nicely.
  • Post #5 - April 7th, 2021, 4:24 pm
    Post #5 - April 7th, 2021, 4:24 pm Post #5 - April 7th, 2021, 4:24 pm
    Hi,

    I bought a cryovac sealed lamb shoulder at Shop and Save for $3.99 per pound last week. It is on sale again this week. I had them split the shoulder in half between the middle rib (or whatever it is) bones.

    Last summer, I participated in an event that was handled virtually. Instead of a nice dinner amongst participants, they provided recipes for people to cook at home.

    The lamb shoulder came with two distinctly different cooking methods:
    - High heat sear in the oven until medium rare, or
    - Braise for several hours until it fall apart tender.
    Added wrinkle, it was a boneless shoulder and I have boney shoulder.

    I am tempted to cook one piece with the high heat, then perhaps slow cook the leftovers. Or braise this piece from the get-go, then cook the second half at high heat.

    If you have any thoughts on this or perhaps experience, let me know.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #6 - April 7th, 2021, 6:58 pm
    Post #6 - April 7th, 2021, 6:58 pm Post #6 - April 7th, 2021, 6:58 pm
    I have had to forego the consumption of red meat for the foreseeable future due to health reasons, GI-related.

    But if I were to break it once...which I may do at some point just because of the description of this...

    I'd get a couple lamb shoulder blade chops, cut fairly thin. In the early days, I would get these dirt-cheap at Jewel or Dominick's because it was the only lamb I could afford. Throw them in a plastic bag with olive oil, a few squeezes of lemon and Greek oregano. Into a hot pan, seared about 3 minutes on each side, done. It would smell up the house something awful, but what a smell!

    My wife wouldn't touch it but my cat went crazy every time I cooked these, so I had to share. A lot of bone-gnawing but I think it was my favorite lamb taste, better than leg o', rack o' for sure.
  • Post #7 - April 8th, 2021, 4:22 am
    Post #7 - April 8th, 2021, 4:22 am Post #7 - April 8th, 2021, 4:22 am
    I picked up my usual semi-boneless leg last Friday along with a whole Rib at my local Pick n Save Easter Sale,
    I bone out the leg completely and the large muscles are roasted rare but the small parts at braised.
    With bone and small parts I made Scotch Broth Soup.
    With shoulders I usually break down and braise but if you can butterfly your pieces so the roast is flat, then a quick sear on the grill, rest and carve. Pepin has a nice marinade with honey and Soy that works great and caramelizes on the grill.
    The Rib is cut into a roast, some steaks and then a boneless pieces is partially frozen to cut sandwich steaks for the grill.
    The left over bones and small pieces made a nice braised dish.
    -Richard
  • Post #8 - April 8th, 2021, 8:22 am
    Post #8 - April 8th, 2021, 8:22 am Post #8 - April 8th, 2021, 8:22 am
    Hi,

    All these are great ideas of what to do with lamb.

    I was watching deboning lamb shoulder on youtube last night. It is pretty straightforward process.

    One person took the small pieces and rolled them into deboned lamb shoulder. These pieces went into holes created by deboning.

    Another person put the bones aside without comment about their use, though a braise sounds great. After deboning the lamb shoulder, he did not roll the lamb into a roast. Instead he cut it into planks for use somewhere else. Again he did not comment, though it could be later cut into kabobs.

    I have made leg of lamb to Julia Child's recipe. She studs it with garlic, rubs soy sauce followed by oil. She cooked her lamb rare. One of my sisters did not approve. When we had guests, she asked if they wanted cooked (throwing into microwave to finish) or raw? If only my leg were long enough to kick her under the table.

    These are all great ideas!

    Regards,
    CAthy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #9 - April 9th, 2021, 8:02 am
    Post #9 - April 9th, 2021, 8:02 am Post #9 - April 9th, 2021, 8:02 am
    When I have a big gathering, I cook two small legs, one rare and one medium well. If it’s a big leg, the well done people get a slice seared in a fry pan.
    For a shoulder I really like butterflying, the Pepin Soy/garlic/honey and grilled over charcoal.
    -Richard
  • Post #10 - April 9th, 2021, 10:19 am
    Post #10 - April 9th, 2021, 10:19 am Post #10 - April 9th, 2021, 10:19 am
    Cathy,

    Remind me not to ever invite your sister over for dinner. That is just plain rude.
  • Post #11 - April 9th, 2021, 1:43 pm
    Post #11 - April 9th, 2021, 1:43 pm Post #11 - April 9th, 2021, 1:43 pm
    lougord99 wrote:Cathy,

    Remind me not to ever invite your sister over for dinner. That is just plain rude.

    She was young and quite optimistic about her opinion. She now has kids, which is the great leveler.
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #12 - April 10th, 2021, 12:51 pm
    Post #12 - April 10th, 2021, 12:51 pm Post #12 - April 10th, 2021, 12:51 pm
    Hi,

    I finally cooked the first half of the lamb shoulder. I removed the bones and cut out larger slabs of fat. It yielded just over 23 ounces of lamb and 20 ounces of fat and bone or $7.45 per pound for the useable meat. I will keep the bones for a future braise and fat for now.

    I tied the shoulder into a small roast. Thankful nobody took a picture of my watching a butcher tie knots and trying to imitate with the lamb and butcher string where my keyboard should be.

    I put in many bits of garlic, then rubbed with soy sauce and later finishing rub of olive oil. I put it into a 400 degree oven with the fan on. It took about 45 minutes to cook to 125 to 130 depending on where you checked. I let it rest about 15 minutes while I roasted asparagus and mashed buttermilk garlic potatoes.

    We loved the lamb with the pan juices on the potatoes and roasted asparagus. It was the Easter dinner we might have had, if I had not already defrosted a ham. As for the ham? It finally was finished this morning for breakfast.

    Regards,
    CAthy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #13 - April 11th, 2021, 4:56 pm
    Post #13 - April 11th, 2021, 4:56 pm Post #13 - April 11th, 2021, 4:56 pm
    Cathy:
    Just one question:Where did you find a decent lamb shoulder? Do you know if this butcher sells ready to put in the oven already deboned and trimmed lamb shoulder roast?
    Tks for the tip if you know of such a butcher.
    Alain
  • Post #14 - April 11th, 2021, 5:20 pm
    Post #14 - April 11th, 2021, 5:20 pm Post #14 - April 11th, 2021, 5:20 pm
    If you want better than decent, I can highly recommend Homestead Meats in Evanston. I think I've gotten both bone-in and boneless there. Excellent quality, though you do pay for it, obviously.

    I believe their current setup is still no walk-ins -- phone orders only.
  • Post #15 - April 11th, 2021, 6:15 pm
    Post #15 - April 11th, 2021, 6:15 pm Post #15 - April 11th, 2021, 6:15 pm
    Alain940 wrote:Cathy:
    Just one question:Where did you find a decent lamb shoulder? Do you know if this butcher sells ready to put in the oven already deboned and trimmed lamb shoulder roast?
    Tks for the tip if you know of such a butcher.
    Alain

    Hi,

    I bought this at Shop and Save. They were in cryovac in the meat section. I then walked it over to the butcher counter to have it cut in half. I had two recipes I was contemplating, which two three-pound sections would have done. I never asked them to debone or tie, but their ad said they would cut for free. It is possible they might have gone further, if I had asked.

    I will likely be there in a week or two, so I can ask them and report back.

    Park Packing had lamb shoulder, too, for $4.99 per pound. They will cut stuff, but I have never seen anything rolled and tied. Whenever I am there next, I will ask, too.

    Regards,
    CAthy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #16 - April 12th, 2021, 8:09 am
    Post #16 - April 12th, 2021, 8:09 am Post #16 - April 12th, 2021, 8:09 am
    How different in flavor and texture is lamb shoulder compared to leg? The only lamb shoulder I've seen is sliced and not whole.
  • Post #17 - April 12th, 2021, 6:11 pm
    Post #17 - April 12th, 2021, 6:11 pm Post #17 - April 12th, 2021, 6:11 pm
    Thank you Cathy. The shoulder I am thinking of, from a very tender lamb from Sisteron, that my sister usually slow bakes, looks a bit too difficult to locate. I do not even know where Stop and Save is . I think I will retreat to my old recipe of half a leg coated with an emulsion of Dijon mustard and Olive oil, with a few Garlic clove inserted, and roasted with thyme, bay leaf, or herbes de Provence, in dry white wine. Alain
  • Post #18 - April 12th, 2021, 6:26 pm
    Post #18 - April 12th, 2021, 6:26 pm Post #18 - April 12th, 2021, 6:26 pm
    Hi,

    On the north side, there is a Shop and Save very close to Superdawg Drive In at:

    6312 N. Nagle Ave
    Chicago, IL 60646
    phone: 773.775.5900
    Store Hours:
    Mon.-Sat. 7am - 9pm
    Sunday 7am - 9pm

    Another is located north of there at:

    7241 Lemont Rd
    Downers Grove, IL 60516
    phone: 630.427.6800
    Store Hours:
    Mon.-Sat. 7am - 10pm
    Sunday 7am - 8pm

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #19 - April 12th, 2021, 8:34 pm
    Post #19 - April 12th, 2021, 8:34 pm Post #19 - April 12th, 2021, 8:34 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:On the north side, there is a Shop and Save very close to Superdawg Drive In...
    There's another location in downtown Des Plaines.
  • Post #20 - April 12th, 2021, 9:35 pm
    Post #20 - April 12th, 2021, 9:35 pm Post #20 - April 12th, 2021, 9:35 pm
    BrendanR wrote:
    Cathy2 wrote:On the north side, there is a Shop and Save very close to Superdawg Drive In...
    There's another location in downtown Des Plaines.

    That might be further west than Alain wishes to go. Oddly as someone who lives further north, I am more often than not at Shop and Save by Midway Airport.

    Alain - I found videos online to debone lamb shoulder and tie. It was very easy.



    I like this slip knot butcher's knot:



    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #21 - April 13th, 2021, 2:16 am
    Post #21 - April 13th, 2021, 2:16 am Post #21 - April 13th, 2021, 2:16 am
    Jim-Bob wrote:How different in flavor and texture is lamb shoulder compared to leg? The only lamb shoulder I've seen is sliced and not whole.


    The difference is in the muscle groups rather than texture and flavor.
    The leg has few large muscles whereas the shoulder has many.
    The leg is easier to carve bone in than a bone in shoulder.
    Boneless, the larger muscles of the leg make for easier usage.
    -Richard
  • Post #22 - April 13th, 2021, 8:21 am
    Post #22 - April 13th, 2021, 8:21 am Post #22 - April 13th, 2021, 8:21 am
    budrichard wrote:The difference is in the muscle groups rather than texture and flavor.
    The leg has few large muscles whereas the shoulder has many.
    The leg is easier to carve bone in than a bone in shoulder.
    Boneless, the larger muscles of the leg make for easier usage.
    -Richard

    That is a very good explanation. My reaction to the question was the flavor and texture seemed the same. At the same time, its been a while since I had leg of lamb.

    Why I cut the shoulder in half was influenced by the recipe I wanted to try. What surprised me was two distinctly different cooking methods: roast to medium rare or braise low-and-slow until it was very tender.

    Next up will be the braise along with the bones from the roast.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #23 - April 14th, 2021, 3:08 am
    Post #23 - April 14th, 2021, 3:08 am Post #23 - April 14th, 2021, 3:08 am
    The bones are browned and used to make a ‘Scotch Broth’ type soup with barley and carrots.
    Sauté your carrots in olive oil with sage or thyme.
    Cook your barley before adding to the soup, I use regular but there is a pre0cooked available.
    You can choose to have just a soup or add sautéed lamb bits to your soup.
    This is a staple in our house.
    -Richard
  • Post #24 - April 14th, 2021, 8:15 am
    Post #24 - April 14th, 2021, 8:15 am Post #24 - April 14th, 2021, 8:15 am
    budrichard wrote:The bones are browned and used to make a ‘Scotch Broth’ type soup with barley and carrots.
    Sauté your carrots in olive oil with sage or thyme.
    Cook your barley before adding to the soup, I use regular but there is a pre0cooked available.
    You can choose to have just a soup or add sautéed lamb bits to your soup.
    This is a staple in our house.
    -Richard

    This was Julia Child's favorite for dealing with leftover lamb. She also made 1950's style curry, which no Indian would recognize, that was pretty good.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #25 - April 14th, 2021, 5:40 pm
    Post #25 - April 14th, 2021, 5:40 pm Post #25 - April 14th, 2021, 5:40 pm
    Thanks a lot Cathy for the very explicit video about boning and trussing a lamb shoulder.
    It is obvious that we are dealing here with a professional and that his skills with butcher and paring knives would not be so easily reproduced by an amateur cook.
    Tks anyway since it was a nice training show nevertheless.
    Alain
  • Post #26 - April 14th, 2021, 9:10 pm
    Post #26 - April 14th, 2021, 9:10 pm Post #26 - April 14th, 2021, 9:10 pm
    Alain940 wrote:Thanks a lot Cathy for the very explicit video about boning and trussing a lamb shoulder.
    It is obvious that we are dealing here with a professional and that his skills with butcher and paring knives would not be so easily reproduced by an amateur cook.
    Tks anyway since it was a nice training show nevertheless.
    Alain

    Alain,

    If I can do it, I am sure you can, too. You appear to be a very good and sensitive to detail cook. I have faith in you. :D
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #27 - Yesterday, 11:50 am
    Post #27 - Yesterday, 11:50 am Post #27 - Yesterday, 11:50 am
    Cathy2 wrote:I finally cooked the first half of the lamb shoulder. I removed the bones and cut out larger slabs of fat. It yielded just over 23 ounces of lamb and 20 ounces of fat and bone or $7.45 per pound for the useable meat. I will keep the bones for a future braise and fat for now.


    Jim-Bob wrote:How different in flavor and texture is lamb shoulder compared to leg? The only lamb shoulder I've seen is sliced and not whole.


    budrichard wrote:The difference is in the muscle groups rather than texture and flavor.
    The leg has few large muscles whereas the shoulder has many.
    The leg is easier to carve bone in than a bone in shoulder.
    Boneless, the larger muscles of the leg make for easier usage.
    -Richard


    I finally got to Costco to find their boneless lamb of leg costs less than the $7.45 per pound for the useable meat on the lamb shoulder. Since budrichard affirmed the difference is not in taste, but rather muscle size. It is less expensive to buy a boneless leg of lamb at Costco.

    I learned a lot, as always, from this conversation.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #28 - Yesterday, 1:12 pm
    Post #28 - Yesterday, 1:12 pm Post #28 - Yesterday, 1:12 pm
    Great discussion! Tnx C2 for those videos. Also, for your cost comparison, which is extremely useful. Makes one think... The lamb shoulder available to me isn't that much cheaper than the semi-boneless leg, to begin with. So in the end, it looks like being cheaper to just go to the leg.

    I have an all-purpose marinade that I use for lamb. It was developed originally by my dearly departed Best Buddy Rusty for grilled Lamb Popsicles--individual lamb chops sliced from the rack bought from Costco. I use this marinade now for all my roasted/grilled lamb. While cooking it suffuses the whole house with an addictive, seductive perfume. Ummmm.

    Half a cup good EVOO
    Quarter cup excellent soy sauce
    Lots of cloves of garlic
    2 Tbs of dried rosemary or needles from several sprigs of fresh rosemary

    At least 24 hours before cooking, mix olive oil and soy in a 1-gallon freezer bag.
    Peel garlic and put in your large mortar [or food processor bowl or blender jar]
    Add rosemary to mortar or bowl or jar and grind or process or blend until a paste forms.
    Add paste to the bag and mix thoroughly with the liquid.
    Add the lamb and slosh thoroughly until it's fully immersed.

    I leave the bag out for several hours, turning it upside down every half hour. Then I refrigerate it overnight, pull it from the fridge several hours before cooking, and repeat the turning every half hour procedure until cooking.

    Amazing flavour!
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)

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