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    Post #1 - March 15th, 2005, 7:28 pm
    Post #1 - March 15th, 2005, 7:28 pm Post #1 - March 15th, 2005, 7:28 pm
    i really love banana bread but whenever i bake it myself, it just doesn't taste the same as the ones sold at bakeries such as sweet mysteries, or even quick breads sold at starbucks. i used the following ingredients:

    * 1/2 cup butter, melted
    * 1 cup white sugar
    * 2 eggs
    * 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
    * 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
    * 1 teaspoon baking soda
    * 1/2 teaspoon salt
    * 1/2 cup sour cream
    * 1/2 cup chopped walnuts
    * 2 medium bananas, sliced
    preheated over 350 degrees and baked for approximately 35-40 min.

    the result came out to be a very light cake-like texture, unlike the dense and rich quick bread texture i prefer. am i doing something wrong? can someone suggest a better recipe?
  • Post #2 - March 15th, 2005, 7:56 pm
    Post #2 - March 15th, 2005, 7:56 pm Post #2 - March 15th, 2005, 7:56 pm
    I use the Silver Palate cookbook recipe, often enough that the book falls open to it, and the main differences I see are another 1/2 stick butter instead of the sour cream, another 1/2 cup flour (actually it's half and half whole wheat and white), and 3 bananas instead of 2 (though I've made it with two, and seen little difference). And I cut the sugar down from 3/4C to about 1/2C.

    The things that would be responsible for rising would be either the eggs or the baking soda, and those quantities are the same, so my guess is either that that extra 1/2C of flour makes a big difference in the final result, or maybe you're whipping the eggs a little in the process or something?

    By the way, I was reading an old Time magazine (I mean like last fall, not 1953) and there was an interview with the CEO of Wal-Mart. You know what the single biggest-selling item at Wal-Mart is? No, not 2XL sweat pants. Bananas. I guess everyone needs bananas....
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  • Post #3 - March 15th, 2005, 9:31 pm
    Post #3 - March 15th, 2005, 9:31 pm Post #3 - March 15th, 2005, 9:31 pm
    Hi,

    In your first sentence you made reference to taste. I've always used overripe bananas for making banana bread. Bananas are at peak ripeness when they have brown spots on them. Although once they peak, they soon become overripe. Using a picture perfect yellow skinned banana is not as full flavored, though fine for out of hand eating. I also grate some rind of orange, though lemon will do as well. Although I prefer nuts in my banana bread, I will also use chocolate chips.

    The recipe I use is from the Joy of Cooking. I used to make banana bread on a very regular basis. It's been a long time since I've made any because bananas are always eaten before they are good enough for baking.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
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  • Post #4 - March 15th, 2005, 10:50 pm
    Post #4 - March 15th, 2005, 10:50 pm Post #4 - March 15th, 2005, 10:50 pm
    Cathy's right. I made *a lot* of banana bread -- essentially anytime I've got old bananas. When I've set out to make the bread out of choice rather than necessity, invariably the results are worse. Why? Because it's difficult to wait long enough for the bananas to ripen. If you can slice the bananas, they're the wrong bananas. They should be rather mottled and caramelly -- on the inside. The outsides should be essentially blackened. You can speed up the process by leaving them in a closed bag at room temp.

    I like Cook's Illustrated's recipe:

    2 C flour
    1 1/4 chopped toasted walnuts
    3/4 C sugar
    3/4 t baking soda
    1/2 t salt
    3 very ripe mashed bananas
    1/4 C plain yogurt
    2 large eggs lightly beaten
    6 T unsalted butter melted and cooled
    1 t vanilla extract

    Basically you sift together the dry ingredients and mix together the wet ingredients separately. Then fold in the dry ingredients. (Stirring too much builds gluten and makes it chewy.) Bake in a greased 9x5 loaf pan at 350 until a toothpick comes out clean, about 55 minutes. I like it to be a little underdone, myself. Also, I think vanilla or strawberry-banana yogurt can be nice, too. Also, a little honey added to the wet ingredients can be nice.

    It's a relatively dense banana bread, but not as brickish as some. Warm with butter is divine.
    Unintentionally retired early by the pandemic, but without the golden parachute.
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  • Post #5 - March 16th, 2005, 12:41 am
    Post #5 - March 16th, 2005, 12:41 am Post #5 - March 16th, 2005, 12:41 am
    i think i stirring the batter too much was my mistake.

    thanks for the recipe from cook's illustrated, i'll try it soon and tell you how it turns out!

    oh, and does anyone recommend where you can buy good banana bread when you're just not in the mood to bake? i found a wonderful version at prairie bakery in oak park. it's so moist that i could eat the whole loaf!
  • Post #6 - March 16th, 2005, 10:56 am
    Post #6 - March 16th, 2005, 10:56 am Post #6 - March 16th, 2005, 10:56 am
    Note that in extramsg's recipe it says "mashed bananas" rather than sliced as your recipe does. That may have a lot to do with why your not getting the dense, moist texture and more banana flavor you want.
    In fact, if your able to cleanly slice your bananas it probably means they are underripe as others have suggested.
    Also, you may be able to cut down on the sugar, if your bananas are riper and sweeter.

    My wife uses slightly mushy bananas and mashes them, but leaving many chunks. This will disperse the banana flavor throughout the bread, but still produce scattered joyful morsels of banana.
  • Post #7 - March 16th, 2005, 10:59 am
    Post #7 - March 16th, 2005, 10:59 am Post #7 - March 16th, 2005, 10:59 am
    Sliced-- I didn't even notice that. Yeah, I'd say unless you mostly have a banana puree mixed into the batter (with, as noted, some chunks to your taste, using a hand masher will let you control that precisely), you're going to get cake, not banana bread.
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  • Post #8 - March 17th, 2005, 2:13 am
    Post #8 - March 17th, 2005, 2:13 am Post #8 - March 17th, 2005, 2:13 am
    As a long-time banana bread aficionado, I HIGHLY recommend this recipe by Tyler Florence. Good to see that the Food Network is still good for something. Follow the recipe as written, including the hair-raising amount of butter and the combo of banana textures, BUT be prepared to bake it for a while longer that Ol' Pretty Boy suggests. Start testing with a skewer at about 45 minutes, and proceed with caution. You may have to tent with foil if it's getting too dark.

    http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/recipes/recipe/0,1977,FOOD_9936_22819,00.html

    Image


    :twisted:
  • Post #9 - March 17th, 2005, 9:40 am
    Post #9 - March 17th, 2005, 9:40 am Post #9 - March 17th, 2005, 9:40 am
    Hi,

    I find recipes on FoodTV are not permanently accessible. Having been burned a couple of times, if I like the recipe then I keep a copy on my harddrive. I don't know if the issue is contractual or volume, recipes lost can be found later on; which is not terribly reliable when you need it now.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways,
  • Post #10 - March 17th, 2005, 9:45 am
    Post #10 - March 17th, 2005, 9:45 am Post #10 - March 17th, 2005, 9:45 am
    Cathy2 wrote:I find recipes on FoodTV are not permanently accessible. Having been burned a couple of times, if I like the recipe then I keep a copy on my harddrive. I don't know if the issue is contractual or volume, recipes lost can be found later on; which is not terribly reliable when you need it now.


    I have found the same thing and have been burned as well. It is my understanding that the issue is contractual. Food Network does not have an unlimited license to reprint the recipes for every one of their chefs/cooks/hosts. Print 'em or copy 'em, because their website content is often fleeting.

    Best,
    Michael / EC
  • Post #11 - June 9th, 2007, 3:12 pm
    Post #11 - June 9th, 2007, 3:12 pm Post #11 - June 9th, 2007, 3:12 pm
    Every once in a while, I will be looking for something entirely different on LAZ's excellent index of recipes, and something will catch my eye - as is the case today.

    I also use the Cook's Illustrated recipe, sometimes substituting 1/4 of the flour for oatmeal just for extra texture. I found out the hard way that it doesn't really make good muffins. However, it reminded me of a recipe I've always wanted to try: The Davis's Army Banana Bread. Good Morning America had them on in 2002 with the secret recipe, but I've never tried it...
  • Post #12 - June 9th, 2007, 6:16 pm
    Post #12 - June 9th, 2007, 6:16 pm Post #12 - June 9th, 2007, 6:16 pm
    A good all-purpose substitute for the nuts in banana bread is Grape-Nuts. I started using them when I ran across a reduced-fat struesel recipe in the Joy of Cooking that called for them and now they've become a kitchen staple. Nice when you're taking baked goods to a party where some guests can't eat nuts.

    I'd add my second or third or fourth to over-beating as the culprit. The rule I remember from my seventh grade home ec class is that you should mix muffins and quick breads just enough to incorporate the wet and dry ingredients. It should still be lumpy when you put it in the pans to bake.
  • Post #13 - May 17th, 2020, 7:53 pm
    Post #13 - May 17th, 2020, 7:53 pm Post #13 - May 17th, 2020, 7:53 pm
    bananabread1.jpg NYT Banana Bread
    Just started a banana bread kick. First loaf.
    The thing about quotes on the internet is you can not confirm their validity. -- Abraham Lincoln
  • Post #14 - May 10th, 2021, 10:49 am
    Post #14 - May 10th, 2021, 10:49 am Post #14 - May 10th, 2021, 10:49 am
    Generally speaking, I don't eat bananas and apparently, neither do the people in my house who continue to request them from the grocery store. But I just can't let anything go to waste, so I used 6 of the 9 rotting bananas on the counter to make a double-batch of banana bread, riffing on a recipe in Joy of Cooking. One was a plain-Jane version, the other had chocolate chips and roasted pecans . . .

    Image
    Banana Bread w/ Chocolate Chips, Roasted Pecans & Kohetsu 1K6 Bread Knife, 240mm

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #15 - May 10th, 2021, 12:31 pm
    Post #15 - May 10th, 2021, 12:31 pm Post #15 - May 10th, 2021, 12:31 pm
    Serendipity that this topic came up: I bought 5 extremely green bananas last Monday in hopes of making banana bread or muffins this weekend with 3 of them and eating a couple. I like to eat bananas when they are golden with a few small brown dots. For banana bread, I like a lot of brown spots and pretty soft.
    These, Chiquita brand from Guatemala, are still light avocado green after a week. Wondering if they'll ever ripen or will just go bad. A new wrinkle in bananas?
  • Post #16 - May 10th, 2021, 12:38 pm
    Post #16 - May 10th, 2021, 12:38 pm Post #16 - May 10th, 2021, 12:38 pm
    tjr wrote:Serendipity that this topic came up: I bought 5 extremely green bananas last Monday in hopes of making banana bread or muffins this weekend with 3 of them and eating a couple. I like to eat bananas when they are golden with a few small brown dots. For banana bread, I like a lot of brown spots and pretty soft.
    These, Chiquita brand from Guatemala, are still light avocado green after a week. Wondering if they'll ever ripen or will just go bad. A new wrinkle in bananas?

    I'm told we've had a few batches like that recently. They were probably just picked way too early. :(

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #17 - May 10th, 2021, 9:26 pm
    Post #17 - May 10th, 2021, 9:26 pm Post #17 - May 10th, 2021, 9:26 pm
    tjr wrote:Serendipity that this topic came up: I bought 5 extremely green bananas last Monday in hopes of making banana bread or muffins this weekend with 3 of them and eating a couple. I like to eat bananas when they are golden with a few small brown dots. For banana bread, I like a lot of brown spots and pretty soft.
    These, Chiquita brand from Guatemala, are still light avocado green after a week. Wondering if they'll ever ripen or will just go bad. A new wrinkle in bananas?
    Most likely not gassed correctly to ripen. Ethylene gas is used to ripen bananas. Put them in a paper bag, and close the bag. That should get them to ripen.
    The thing about quotes on the internet is you can not confirm their validity. -- Abraham Lincoln
  • Post #18 - May 12th, 2021, 11:06 am
    Post #18 - May 12th, 2021, 11:06 am Post #18 - May 12th, 2021, 11:06 am
    xexo wrote:Put them in a paper bag, and close the bag. That should get them to ripen.

    Thanks, will try that next time. I ate one last night. Despite the unappetizing peel, it was pretty good but still firm after a week.
  • Post #19 - February 26th, 2024, 8:31 pm
    Post #19 - February 26th, 2024, 8:31 pm Post #19 - February 26th, 2024, 8:31 pm
    This is another Claire Saffitz recipe. Yes, I think I'm falling in love, lol! This clever recipe puts a very nice twist on banana bread, via the inclusion of almond butter in the batter and also as part of a crispy topping . . .

    Image
    Claire Saffitz's Banana Bread
    Another interesting thing is that there's no butter in the recipe. The fat is all coconut oil, per se. I think the almond butter actually accentuates the banana flavor. This is a very fine recipe.

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #20 - February 27th, 2024, 10:48 am
    Post #20 - February 27th, 2024, 10:48 am Post #20 - February 27th, 2024, 10:48 am
    An interesting departure from old-fashioned BB. Did you use virgin coconut oil, which tastes a little coconutty, or ordinary refined oil? And was the cardamom flavor noticeable?

    Recipe also seems like a candidate for vegan conversion by using flax meal, perhaps, as an egg substitute.
  • Post #21 - February 27th, 2024, 12:04 pm
    Post #21 - February 27th, 2024, 12:04 pm Post #21 - February 27th, 2024, 12:04 pm
    tjr wrote:An interesting departure from old-fashioned BB. Did you use virgin coconut oil, which tastes a little coconutty, or ordinary refined oil? And was the cardamom flavor noticeable?

    Recipe also seems like a candidate for vegan conversion by using flax meal, perhaps, as an egg substitute.

    Not that I can ever see myself making it but the seemingly easy vegan adjustment was one of my first thoughts when I read the recipe. That would probably be great some for some folks.

    I used virgin coconut oil. It had no discernible coconut aroma. In fact, it was so 'clean,' that may have been another reason why the banana flavor and aroma were so pronounced. I opted out on the cardamom. Instead, I added a scant half-teaspoon of Vietnamese cinnamon. That stuff is wonderfully strong and the amount I used seemed just about perfect for us. It added a subtle but pleasant note.

    I think the main take-away from this, at least for me, is that almond butter is a great addition to banana bread. It seems so obvious but it never would have occurred to me.

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #22 - March 21st, 2024, 11:10 pm
    Post #22 - March 21st, 2024, 11:10 pm Post #22 - March 21st, 2024, 11:10 pm
    I enjoyed Claire Saffitz's banana bread recipe so much, I bought bananas and let them brown just so I could make it again . . .

    Image
    Almond Butter-Infused Banana Bread & Kohetsu 1K6 Bread Knife 240mm
    Again, was very happy with the outcome, especially the swirly business on top, which baked up in a more defined way this time around. For that part of the recipe, I used solid coconut oil instead of melted and it seemed to have a favorable impact.

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #23 - March 22nd, 2024, 8:23 am
    Post #23 - March 22nd, 2024, 8:23 am Post #23 - March 22nd, 2024, 8:23 am
    ronnie_suburban wrote:
    tjr wrote:An interesting departure from old-fashioned BB. Did you use virgin coconut oil, which tastes a little coconutty, or ordinary refined oil? And was the cardamom flavor noticeable?

    Recipe also seems like a candidate for vegan conversion by using flax meal, perhaps, as an egg substitute.



    I used virgin coconut oil. It had no discernible coconut aroma. In fact, it was so 'clean,' that may have been another reason why the banana flavor and aroma were so pronounced.

    =R=


    I'm by no means an expert, just basing this off of spidey sense. I'm not sure that "virgin" also means "unrefined." I'm pretty sure that "unrefined" coconut oil has all the coconut flavor / aroma. Unrefined coconut oil has turned into a secret weapon in my house. Fkn delicious stuff.
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  • Post #24 - March 22nd, 2024, 2:11 pm
    Post #24 - March 22nd, 2024, 2:11 pm Post #24 - March 22nd, 2024, 2:11 pm
    I'm just stumbling on this thread now. I apologize if this tip has been mentioned before, but I did not see it:

    If you've got over-ripe bananas but don't have time or energy to make banana bread (muffins, or cake), place the entire unpeeled bananas in a plastic bag & freeze them. When you are ready to bake with them, remove them from the freezer, allow them to thaw, and then remove the peel and add the banana pulp to a bowl. The pulp will be very runny so you want to hold the banana over the bowl as you unpeel it. Do let them thaw first, or some of the fibrous interior of the peel will adhere to the pulp, and you'll need to pull it off. Don't worry about the excess volume of liquid compared to an unfrozen, ripe banana. It will still work fine in your recipe.

    I've been doing this for years, keeping a zip-lock gallon bag in the freezer where I add bananas as they over-ripen.
  • Post #25 - March 22nd, 2024, 2:52 pm
    Post #25 - March 22nd, 2024, 2:52 pm Post #25 - March 22nd, 2024, 2:52 pm
    masha wrote:I'm just stumbling on this thread now. I apologize if this tip has been mentioned before, but I did not see it:

    If you've got over-ripe bananas but don't have time or energy to make banana bread (muffins, or cake), place the entire unpeeled bananas in a plastic bag & freeze them. When you are ready to bake with them, remove them from the freezer, allow them to thaw, and then remove the peel and add the banana pulp to a bowl. The pulp will be very runny so you want to hold the banana over the bowl as you unpeel it. Do let them thaw first, or some of the fibrous interior of the peel will adhere to the pulp, and you'll need to pull it off. Don't worry about the excess volume of liquid compared to an unfrozen, ripe banana. It will still work fine in your recipe.

    I've been doing this for years, keeping a zip-lock gallon bag in the freezer where I add bananas as they over-ripen.


    Great for banana daiquiris as well.
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #26 - March 22nd, 2024, 4:06 pm
    Post #26 - March 22nd, 2024, 4:06 pm Post #26 - March 22nd, 2024, 4:06 pm
    boudreaulicious wrote:
    masha wrote:I'm just stumbling on this thread now. I apologize if this tip has been mentioned before, but I did not see it:

    If you've got over-ripe bananas but don't have time or energy to make banana bread (muffins, or cake), place the entire unpeeled bananas in a plastic bag & freeze them. When you are ready to bake with them, remove them from the freezer, allow them to thaw, and then remove the peel and add the banana pulp to a bowl. The pulp will be very runny so you want to hold the banana over the bowl as you unpeel it. Do let them thaw first, or some of the fibrous interior of the peel will adhere to the pulp, and you'll need to pull it off. Don't worry about the excess volume of liquid compared to an unfrozen, ripe banana. It will still work fine in your recipe.

    I've been doing this for years, keeping a zip-lock gallon bag in the freezer where I add bananas as they over-ripen.


    Great for banana daiquiris as well.

    Nice! I would have never thought to freeze them whole/unpeeled but that makes sense, especially for portioning them on use.

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #27 - April 4th, 2024, 11:03 pm
    Post #27 - April 4th, 2024, 11:03 pm Post #27 - April 4th, 2024, 11:03 pm
    One more attempt at Claire Saffitz's almond butter-amped banana bread . . .

    Image
    Banana Bread
    Really digging this recipe, probably more than I actually like bananas, so it may be time to move on for a while. But I'm definitely keeping this one on the short list.

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #28 - April 5th, 2024, 8:15 am
    Post #28 - April 5th, 2024, 8:15 am Post #28 - April 5th, 2024, 8:15 am
    While in Florida a few days ago, I met up with a family member who handed off a loaf of their homemade Cardamom bread. It was a yeast bread that had a good density and richness. My very first thought at first bite: Banana / Cardamom Bread needs to happen. My whole family went "Oooooooooooh!"

    I'm making it very soon.
    We cannot be friends if you do not know the difference between Mayo and Miracle Whip.
    Pronoun: That fool over there
    Identifies as: A human that doesn't need to "identify as" something to try to somehow be interesting.
  • Post #29 - April 5th, 2024, 11:25 am
    Post #29 - April 5th, 2024, 11:25 am Post #29 - April 5th, 2024, 11:25 am
    Are there any recipes for yeast risen banana bread?

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