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What are you making for dinner tonite?

What are you making for dinner tonite?
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  • Post #3031 - April 5th, 2024, 2:49 pm
    Post #3031 - April 5th, 2024, 2:49 pm Post #3031 - April 5th, 2024, 2:49 pm
    bweiny wrote:
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Skokie International Market
    5314 Lincoln Ave
    Skokie, IL 60077
    (224) 536-4010
    This place is such a wasted opportunity. I wished it were an Asian version of the Village Market Place east on Dempster. I couldn't find a single thing I wanted to buy in there.

    I agree that it could be so much better -- and this isn't a endorsement -- but at least's gotten better since when it first opened. That said, I don't think I've ever seen a piece of produce there that enticed me in any way. It's a sad, sad aisle. I mainly pantry-shop there. I also find it annoying that it's called "International" because while that is technically true, it's strictly Asian.

    bweiny wrote:
    ronnie_suburban wrote:The nearest Butera is about 15 miles from home, so while this won't be 'course of normal shopping' for me, if I need it, at least I now have a good lead.

    Not encouraging you to check them out, but I think their Gunnison/Nagle spot is probably half that far.

    That one's even farther from home -- over 20 miles -- and not between my office and my house. Palatine is closest to home.

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #3032 - April 5th, 2024, 2:54 pm
    Post #3032 - April 5th, 2024, 2:54 pm Post #3032 - April 5th, 2024, 2:54 pm
    ronnie_suburban wrote:
    bweiny wrote:
    ronnie_suburban wrote:The nearest Butera is about 15 miles from home, so while this won't be 'course of normal shopping' for me, if I need it, at least I now have a good lead.

    Not encouraging you to check them out, but I think their Gunnison/Nagle spot is probably half that far.

    That one's even farther from home -- over 20 miles -- and not between my office and my house. Palatine is closest to home.
    Sorry. I could've sworn you described yourself as living in the Logan Square area. Either my memory is inexplicably off, or you moved.
  • Post #3033 - April 5th, 2024, 3:40 pm
    Post #3033 - April 5th, 2024, 3:40 pm Post #3033 - April 5th, 2024, 3:40 pm
    bweiny wrote:
    ronnie_suburban wrote:
    bweiny wrote:
    ronnie_suburban wrote:The nearest Butera is about 15 miles from home, so while this won't be 'course of normal shopping' for me, if I need it, at least I now have a good lead.

    Not encouraging you to check them out, but I think their Gunnison/Nagle spot is probably half that far.

    That one's even farther from home -- over 20 miles -- and not between my office and my house. Palatine is closest to home.
    Sorry. I could've sworn you described yourself as living in the Logan Square area. Either my memory is inexplicably off, or you moved.

    Yeah. You're correct. Formerly Logan but it's been a couple of years. We're back exclusively in Southern Lake County now.

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #3034 - April 5th, 2024, 6:42 pm
    Post #3034 - April 5th, 2024, 6:42 pm Post #3034 - April 5th, 2024, 6:42 pm
    Burger night. But first, some side-dishery . . .

    Image
    Lentil Mise En Place & Konosuke Fujiyama FM Blue #2 Funayuki/Gyuto, 240mm
    Yellow onion, salt, evoo, minced garlic, homemade chicken stock, lentils, parsley, carrot & bay leaves, celery, 4x gelatinous pork stock and black pepper.

    Would have preferred to make beans but I had limited time, so I went with some no-soak-needed, quicker-cooking lentils (which I also love). Chicken stock most certainly would have been enough -- heck, water would have been enough -- but I had the concentrated pork stock on hand, so I decided to add some to help boost the lip-smacking collagen factor.

    Meanwhile, using some pre-formed patties from the now-nearly-depleted box of meat, a variation on Oklahoma Onion Burgers . . .

    Image
    Burger Mise & Yu Kurosaki Fujin VG10 Petty, 150mm
    Sesame seed buns, thick-sliced 'Merikan cheese, homemade garlic-dill pickles, pre-formed beef patties of unknown provenance, unsalted butter, black pepper, salt, mandoline-cut yellow and red onions.

    Image
    Plated Up
    With a blob of the weekly slaw and some Route 11 lightly salted potato chips.

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #3035 - April 6th, 2024, 9:54 am
    Post #3035 - April 6th, 2024, 9:54 am Post #3035 - April 6th, 2024, 9:54 am
    bweiny wrote:I wished it were an Asian version of the Village Market Place east on Dempster.
    I've driven past there many times, never stopped in. What's it like? Ditto Sarah's Tent, not even sure what sort of store that is...

    Ron, if you're ever headed northward to the land o'cheese, the Grayslake Butera is pretty close to Rt 120 and US45, easy jaunt off I94. It's probably the worst Butera, though. And the Piggly Wigglys in Kenosha stock much the same stuff as Butera, altho I can't vouch for turkey parts.
  • Post #3036 - April 6th, 2024, 7:11 pm
    Post #3036 - April 6th, 2024, 7:11 pm Post #3036 - April 6th, 2024, 7:11 pm
    This Washington Post recipe for Chile Relleno Casserole had red flags all over it but still, there was something compellingly comforting about it, so I decided to give it a shot . . .

    Image
    Mise En Place & Yu Kurosaki Fujin VG10 Petty, 120mm
    Yellow onion, roasted/skinned/seeded poblano peppers, unsalted butter, eggs, ground pork, shredded chihuahua, shredded aged cheddar, ground cotija, AP flour, salt, cumin, ancho chile powder, whole milk and black pepper.

    Once I was into re-reading the recipe, making the dish and tasting it along the way, everything seemed under-seasoned. So, I ended up adding some seasonings that were not called for in the original recipe (ancho among them, along with more salt, more pepper, more cumin, granulated garlic, onion and some Mexican oregano). Since I had ground pork on hand, that's what I used (recipe calls for beef). I also decided that using 100% cheddar didn't sound great, so I went with an 80/20 mix of chihuahua and cheddar. The addition of the cotija was also my modification. I also upped the overall size/quantity and went with a 9x13" version over the 9x9" square the recipe calls for. In the end, I'd say the recipe was more inspiration than actual road map but it worked out nicely.

    Image
    Chile Relleno Casserole
    Because I went with a larger batch/vessel, I baked this for ~45 minutes @ 350F (instead of 375F). I also turned the fan on at the end for 3-4 minutes.

    Image
    Plated Up
    With some Mexican restaurant-style rice (tomatoes, tomato paste, chicken/tomato bouillon power, carrot, onion). Ingredient details aside, in the end, I think this is a great method/technique. I'd love to try it again, working some sauteed mushrooms into the mix. Chorizo might be great, too. I'm definitely glad I followed my gut on some of the specifics but in the end, this is nothing I ever would have come up with on my own. Tasty, comforting, versatile and relatively easy to put together.

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #3037 - April 7th, 2024, 7:56 am
    Post #3037 - April 7th, 2024, 7:56 am Post #3037 - April 7th, 2024, 7:56 am
    That looks to be a good campfire Dutch oven dish (most of which recipes are indeed under seasoned)
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #3038 - April 7th, 2024, 5:56 pm
    Post #3038 - April 7th, 2024, 5:56 pm Post #3038 - April 7th, 2024, 5:56 pm
    JoelF wrote:That looks to be a good campfire Dutch oven dish (most of which recipes are indeed under seasoned)

    Seems like a lot to bring to a campfire but as long as you're toting eggs, roasted peppers and a Dutch oven, you might as well bring some seasonings, too! :lol:

    Dinner tonight for us was our #1 prep . . .

    Image
    Charcoal-Grilled Chicken Thighs
    Happy place! :D

    Image
    Plated Up
    With our first asparagus of the season (almost certainly not local but I was fully in the mood for it) -- butter, lemon -- and some leftover/reheated lentils.

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #3039 - April 7th, 2024, 6:42 pm
    Post #3039 - April 7th, 2024, 6:42 pm Post #3039 - April 7th, 2024, 6:42 pm
    JoelF wrote:That looks to be a good campfire Dutch oven dish (most of which recipes are indeed under seasoned)

    Always an easy fix!
    If you aren't tasting, you aren't cooking.
  • Post #3040 - April 7th, 2024, 6:58 pm
    Post #3040 - April 7th, 2024, 6:58 pm Post #3040 - April 7th, 2024, 6:58 pm
    Joel,
    With the exception of some baking publications, many cookbook recipes are untested and just ballpark outlines from The Next Food TV Superstar wannabe…

    Others spend the money to have their ballpark recipes tested.

    Good ol’ negative Evil Ronnie strikes again…
    If you aren't tasting, you aren't cooking.
  • Post #3041 - April 8th, 2024, 11:27 am
    Post #3041 - April 8th, 2024, 11:27 am Post #3041 - April 8th, 2024, 11:27 am
    ronnie_suburban wrote:
    JoelF wrote:That looks to be a good campfire Dutch oven dish (most of which recipes are indeed under seasoned)

    Seems like a lot to bring to a campfire but as long as you're toting eggs, roasted peppers and a Dutch oven, you might as well bring some seasonings, too! :lol:

    Ronnie,
    I'll have to post some pictures from our trailer camp kitchen. Big cooler, spice rack, Dutch oven, charcoal... just need the chilis (got a half a poblano from last night's chicken tacos), ground meat, and more cheese than we're hauling this weekend.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #3042 - April 8th, 2024, 11:41 am
    Post #3042 - April 8th, 2024, 11:41 am Post #3042 - April 8th, 2024, 11:41 am
    JoelF wrote:
    ronnie_suburban wrote:
    JoelF wrote:That looks to be a good campfire Dutch oven dish (most of which recipes are indeed under seasoned)

    Seems like a lot to bring to a campfire but as long as you're toting eggs, roasted peppers and a Dutch oven, you might as well bring some seasonings, too! :lol:

    Ronnie,
    I'll have to post some pictures from our trailer camp kitchen. Big cooler, spice rack, Dutch oven, charcoal... just need the chilis (got a half a poblano from last night's chicken tacos), ground meat, and more cheese than we're hauling this weekend.

    Yeah, I remember the pics. You definitely have room for a full array herbs and spices!

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #3043 - April 11th, 2024, 6:45 pm
    Post #3043 - April 11th, 2024, 6:45 pm Post #3043 - April 11th, 2024, 6:45 pm
    Been an exceptionally busy few days but I really wanted to cook dinner. Started with some side-dishery . . .

    Image
    Mise En Place & Kanjo ZDP189 Gyuto, 210mm
    White wine, chives, unsalted butter, minced garlic, hakurei turnips, soy sauce and danshan. Just a quick stir-fry here . . .

    Image
    Spicy Stir-Fried Turnips

    As for the main course, my travels today took me right by foodstuffs, one of my favorite spots for fresh fish. When I arrived, they were just taking their ice-packed delivery off the truck . . .

    Image
    Grilling
    Norwegian farm-raised salmon. Marinated/basted in teriyaki and dusted with my personal BBQ rub.

    Image
    Plated Up
    With leftover/reheated lentils. Damn - I needed that! :)

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #3044 - April 13th, 2024, 11:35 am
    Post #3044 - April 13th, 2024, 11:35 am Post #3044 - April 13th, 2024, 11:35 am
    tjr wrote:
    bweiny wrote:I wished it were an Asian version of the Village Market Place east on Dempster.
    I've driven past there many times, never stopped in. What's it like? Ditto Sarah's Tent, not even sure what sort of store that is...
    VMP is just stocked tightly like a Jerry's/Fresh Farms with produce at the entrance, then a regular grocery store with deli and packaged meats, etc. A few aisles for non-perishable. It's probably Eastern European owned/directed, if not maybe Greek? I had to Google Sarah's Tent. No reason I'd go out of my way to a kosher store.
  • Post #3045 - April 13th, 2024, 1:57 pm
    Post #3045 - April 13th, 2024, 1:57 pm Post #3045 - April 13th, 2024, 1:57 pm
    bweiny wrote:
    tjr wrote:
    bweiny wrote:I wished it were an Asian version of the Village Market Place east on Dempster.
    I've driven past there many times, never stopped in. What's it like? Ditto Sarah's Tent, not even sure what sort of store that is...
    VMP is just stocked tightly like a Jerry's/Fresh Farms with produce at the entrance, then a regular grocery store with deli and packaged meats, etc. A few aisles for non-perishable. It's probably Eastern European owned/directed, if not maybe Greek? I had to Google Sarah's Tent. No reason I'd go out of my way to a kosher store.

    Useless trivia = the original owner of VMP was one or both of the brothers that owned Arvey’s in Niles. Not sure who owns it these days.
    Never order barbecue in a place that also serves quiche - Lewis Grizzard
  • Post #3046 - April 14th, 2024, 10:55 am
    Post #3046 - April 14th, 2024, 10:55 am Post #3046 - April 14th, 2024, 10:55 am
    Here's a quick one from a couple of days ago, when we had some friends over for dinner . . .

    Image
    Veg Mise En Place & Kanjo ZDP189 Gyuto, 210mm
    Avocado oil, oyster sauce, ramp leaves, mini tomatoes, green beans, fish sauce, minced garlic & jalapeno and soy sauce.

    Finally got around to using up the ramp leaves that I trimmed and cleaned a few days ago. Happily, they were in very good shape. Decided to use them here -- along with some mini tomatoes -- to boost some stir-fried green beans.

    Next up, out to the grill . . .

    Image
    Grilling
    Prime NY Strips from Costco. Flavorful but pretty darned chewy.

    Image
    Plated Up
    With some allium & mushroom-spiked quinoa.

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #3047 - April 14th, 2024, 6:49 pm
    Post #3047 - April 14th, 2024, 6:49 pm Post #3047 - April 14th, 2024, 6:49 pm
    Another group dinner, this one on the fly. Glad I had this commercially vacuum-sealed roast in the fridge . . .

    Image
    Bone-In Berkshire Pork Rib Roast
    Trussed, seasoned and roasted low & slow at 200F to render out some of the fat. Blasted it at the end via convection-roast to crisp up the exterior.

    Image
    Plated Up
    With steamed/chilled asparagus & dijon vinaigrette, leftover/reheated veg-spiked quinoa and ramped-up green beans. Took it to 140F internal, which helped render out the larger areas of interior fat while keeping the meat moist as it cooked. These Berkshire roasts that I get from Zier's are awesome but their fattiness needs to be reined in a bit for maximum palatability.

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #3048 - April 15th, 2024, 5:55 pm
    Post #3048 - April 15th, 2024, 5:55 pm Post #3048 - April 15th, 2024, 5:55 pm
    Had an orphaned end from a side of Norwegian farm-raised salmon I bought (and grilled most of) last week. Planned on simply seasoning it and pan-searing it just to use it up but once it was going, I couldn't help myself. Ended up with a pretty nice dish . . .

    Image
    Pan-Seared Salmon
    Once it was cooked, I removed it and hit the pan with some shallots, mini tomatoes, white wine and parsley. High heat, quick reduction and off.

    Image
    Plated Up
    With some toasted/buttered home-baked milk bread, leftover/reheated lentils and a blob of the weekly slaw. Always nice to turn nothing into something.

    Happy Monday! :)

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #3049 - April 16th, 2024, 3:35 am
    Post #3049 - April 16th, 2024, 3:35 am Post #3049 - April 16th, 2024, 3:35 am
    Last week we had some interesting Berkshire pork bratwursts from Sherwood Forest meat market in downtown Kenosha. The staffer told us very emphatically not to "boil" them, just to gently grill. Her method worked very well and the brats were quite good. Milder and slightly finer grind/more well bound than usual. Oddly, considering that Berkshire pork is regarded as fattier than ordinary pork, the brats were noticeably leaner than typical. She mentioned that too as though it were a goal in their recipe.

    Sunday brought some more very good bratwursts from Berkot's in Burlington, WI. These had more in common with the usual brats, but the texture and spicing were an upgrade from most. Being a traditionalist where WI sausage is concerned, I did steam poach those in beer. Next time I may try the slow grilling all the way approach.
  • Post #3050 - April 18th, 2024, 7:12 pm
    Post #3050 - April 18th, 2024, 7:12 pm Post #3050 - April 18th, 2024, 7:12 pm
    tjr wrote:Oddly, considering that Berkshire pork is regarded as fattier than ordinary pork, the brats were noticeably leaner than typical. She mentioned that too as though it were a goal in their recipe.

    It'd be just about impossible to make a palatable sausage with less than 25-30% fat content. It can be done but it would require binding agents, outside ingredients, etc. Without fat or replacers, you're likely to end up with a casing full of unbound, crumbly ground meat.

    The main key to a well-made sausage that doesn't feel overly fatty is to bind and/or emulsify it correctly. And counterintuitively, this requires, among other things, fat. If it's made right, the fat will not run out of the sausage when it's cooked.

    Yes, Berkshire can be fattier than some other breeds but at the end of the day, sausage is likely made from the shoulder or butt and the fat content of the specific pieces of meat used to make a consistent, quality sausage is closely monitored and controlled. At that point, it's more butchery know-how and science than art but it is still a combination. Sounds like the folks at Sherwood Forest have it down pat. I especially like a brat that doesn't think it needs boiling. Yes, that may be a thing in WI but really, a well made sausage will never need -- and will probably suffer from -- such treatment.

    Tonight's mission: heat up some leftovers and get RID of some veg odds & ends that needed to get cooked . . .

    Image
    Mise En Place & Anryu AS Gyuto, 210mm
    Everything but the salt & pepper: evoo, brussels sprouts, spring onion tops, cremini mushrooms, minced garlic, spring onion bottoms, white wine and ramp leaves.

    Normally, I'd avoid combining uniquely flavored ramps with other alliums but in this case, the goal was to use stuff up before it went south. This was largely a collection of stuff I bought that just hadn't gotten to. I hate throwing anything away but it's been a busier than expected week and I didn't cook nearly as often as I'd planned on. So, into the wok it all went.

    Image
    Stir Fried Veg
    Had this with some leftover/reheated Berkshire pork roast. Everything was tasty and it felt great to get RID of the spring onions, mushrooms ramps, brussels sprouts and pork roast. :)

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #3051 - April 19th, 2024, 5:39 am
    Post #3051 - April 19th, 2024, 5:39 am Post #3051 - April 19th, 2024, 5:39 am
    The web site says the brats are grilled and smoked before purchase, so all you need to do is warm. Is that what you had ? I've never heard of smoking brats.
  • Post #3052 - April 19th, 2024, 8:44 am
    Post #3052 - April 19th, 2024, 8:44 am Post #3052 - April 19th, 2024, 8:44 am
    lougord99 wrote:The web site says the brats are grilled and smoked before purchase, so all you need to do is warm. Is that what you had ? I've never heard of smoking brats.
    No, the ones we bought were raw. But the worker told us that she cooks up batches of brats on a grill behind the store, then packs and freezes them for heat'n'serve.

    If you search up "smoked bratwurst" you will find many pellet smoker references for hot smoked, fully cooked bratwurst. Consensus seems to be about 1 to 1.5 hr @ 225F with plenty of smoke. Some of the old-time Wisconsin meat markets used to sell these.

    Cold smoked brats would be a different story - technically they'd need to be cured and would have a different flavor.
    ronnie_suburban wrote:It'd be just about impossible to make a palatable sausage with less than 25-30% fat content. It can be done but it would require binding agents, outside ingredients, etc. Without fat or replacers, you're likely to end up with a casing full of unbound, crumbly ground meat.

    The main key to a well-made sausage that doesn't feel overly fatty is to bind and/or emulsify it correctly. And counterintuitively, this requires, among other things, fat. If it's made right, the fat will not run out of the sausage when it's cooked.
    It's indeed possible Sherwood Forest's brats are better bound than the typical ones. Could be longer mixing, slightly finer grind or mixed rather than uniform grind, different cuts going in, or even different protein characteristics of Berkshire pork. The texture was a bit tighter than usual. Unfortunately they don't have a nutrition label so the fat content is unknown. For reference, Johnsonville brats are about 19% fat (21g fat/108g uncooked sausage; the 82g serving size is after cooking. Altho that doesn't account for fat that comes out during cooking.)

    30some years ago when my mom "demonstrated" Johnsonville's brats and other fresh sausages at supermarkets, the Johnsonville rep taught her their ideal way of cooking, constrained of course by the need to cook on a card table: Put cold links into an electric skillet, add water about a third of the way up the sausages, power the skillet on medium low until the water had slowly evaporated and the sausages were lightly browned in the remaining fat. Customers often asked, "Where's the beer?" It was illegal to crack a beer in most WI supermarkets in those days. Great results, just lacked the hop and charcoal flavor.

    Last night I made a sort of lightning cassoulet of soaked chana dal, chunks of leftover Berkot's bratwurst and grilled pork tenderloin, diced sweet potatoes, tomatoes and bell peppers. Pretty good for the effort and speed, got gobbled up fast enough. Ideally could have used a bread accompaniment, not to mention crumb broiled topping, but we had starched out on tortilla chips and tomatillo salsa while waiting.
  • Post #3053 - April 19th, 2024, 6:21 pm
    Post #3053 - April 19th, 2024, 6:21 pm Post #3053 - April 19th, 2024, 6:21 pm
    This recently posted youtube video by Pailin intrigued me enough to give it a try. Sen Chan Pad Pu certainly requires fewer steps than Pad Thai but I wouldn't go so far as to say it's "way easier," either. It's a few less steps. Still, I've been on a noodle kick lately and this one seemed right in my wheelhouse . . .

    Image
    Mise En Place, Henckels Stainless Steel Four Star Utility Knife, 6" & Anryu AS Gyuto, 210mm
    Bean sprouts, 16/20 shrimp, shaved palm sugar, cucumbers, rice sticks (later soaked for ~30 minutes), shallots, garlic chives, garlic, tamarind concentrate, fish sauce, avocado oil and dried/seeded guajillo and heaven-facing chiles.

    As long as there's palm sugar, there'll always be a need for a nice old Henckels utility knife. The stuff's virtually rock-hard and I'd never want to put a blade I cared about in contact with it. The soft-steeled Henckels dispatched it efficiently sans any stress.

    As Pailin's video shows, the foundation of Sen Chan Pad Pu is a paste made from the dried chiles (ground into a powder), the garlic and the shallots. In a wok, that paste is combined with the fish sauce, the tamarind paste, some water and the palm sugar to form a sauce. The shrimp are cooked briefly in it, then removed. From there, the pre-soaked/drained rice noodles are added. When they're cooked, add back the shrimp, along with most of the beans sprouts and garlic chives. At this point one can also add some crab meat. After that, plate it up and serve it with some cucumber, plus the remainder of the garlic chives, the bean sprouts and some lime wedges . . .

    Image
    Sen Chan Pad Pu
    Garnished with crab meat, etc.

    Sad to say that as nice as this might look, it was a fail. My guess is that the color is an indicator. Too much tamarind. I don't think it should have been scaled up proportionately with the other ingredients as indicated in Pailin's recipe. It dominated. I wish I'd held some back. With this kind of prep, it's tough to add it as you go or to tell on the way in how it will taste on the way out. To that end, I did taste the sauce it before I added it to the wok, and again, after I'd added the palm sugar but without the noodles, it was hard to tell how it would eventually play. I've never missed with a Pailin recipe before. This was a first. I may try it again with a very small batch, adding only a scant amount of tamarind and seeing how it goes. The salty-sweet-sour trinity that makes Thai food so special was way out of balance here . . . essentially absent. Oh well. :cry:


    This Is Way Easier Than Pad Thai!

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #3054 - April 20th, 2024, 8:47 pm
    Post #3054 - April 20th, 2024, 8:47 pm Post #3054 - April 20th, 2024, 8:47 pm
    Chinese feast for several friends of ours:

    Three slivers salad (celtuce, carrot, bean thread) with mustard dressing (Fuschia Dunlop recipe)
    Hot and Sour Soup (Lopez-Alt recipe)
    Beef and Chive (garden) dumplings (Asian Dumplings)
    Mu Shu Chicken (Kenji again)
    Bok Choy in oyster sauce (improv)
    Almond Cookies (King Arthur Flour)
    Sesame Balls with chocolate (Asian Dumplings again)
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #3055 - April 21st, 2024, 6:29 pm
    Post #3055 - April 21st, 2024, 6:29 pm Post #3055 - April 21st, 2024, 6:29 pm
    Was the in the mood for meatballs and red sauce, neither of which I'd made in a while . . .

    Image
    Meatball Mise En Place & Nakagawa Hamono Ginsan Gyuto, 240mm
    Panko, eggs, microplaned garlic, 50/50 ground pork & beef, salt (1% by weight), whole milk, black pepper, parmigiano reggiano and parsley. This is my very close adaptation of Lidia Bastianich's recipe. My only material change is adding the milk and making a panade to create the meatballs.

    Once formed into ~100g balls, I convection-roasted them for about 20 minutes at 400F (turn halfway). Once they were set and slightly browned, I set them aside for cooking later in the sauce. Normally, I just crack open a jar of Rao's but for whatever reason, I was in the mood to make sauce today . . .

    Image
    Sauce Mise En Place & Nakagawa Hamono Ginsan Gyuto, 240mm
    Yellow onion, microplaned, garlic, tomato paste, evoo, red wine, tomato sauce, dried oregano/rosemary/basil, crushed tomatoes x 2, salt & black pepper. Largely just clearing out the pantry here but the sauce ended up being really nice, so I was happy I spent the time on it.

    Image
    Plated Up
    Spaghetti & Meatballs with some hot Italian sausage from Poeta's that I browned and cooked with the sauce. Side car of blanched/chilled broccoli salad with garlic-dijon vinaigrette.

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #3056 - April 25th, 2024, 7:09 pm
    Post #3056 - April 25th, 2024, 7:09 pm Post #3056 - April 25th, 2024, 7:09 pm
    A nice quickie on the grill . . .

    Image
    Hangers & Kielbasa
    Not quite enough steak to go around, so tossed in a bit of sausage, too.

    Image
    Asparagus
    When the meats were done and resting, it was time to put the asparagus on. Lightly oiled, salted and then ~8 minutes covered/indirect/tips away.

    Image
    Plated Up
    With some pickled ramps (2023 stock) and a slice of toasted Jalapeno-Cheddar bread from Loaf Lounge.

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #3057 - April 26th, 2024, 6:02 am
    Post #3057 - April 26th, 2024, 6:02 am Post #3057 - April 26th, 2024, 6:02 am
    Since I don't shop at Mariano's anymore, I don't see hanger steaks ( they probably don't carry them anyways) . Do you get yours at Zier's ?
  • Post #3058 - April 26th, 2024, 6:05 am
    Post #3058 - April 26th, 2024, 6:05 am Post #3058 - April 26th, 2024, 6:05 am
    Image
    Roasted Pepper Steak. Another good recipe from Mandy at Souped up Recipes : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=roqeCIat3IY
  • Post #3059 - April 26th, 2024, 9:33 am
    Post #3059 - April 26th, 2024, 9:33 am Post #3059 - April 26th, 2024, 9:33 am
    lougord99 wrote:Image
    Roasted Pepper Steak. Another good recipe from Mandy at Souped up Recipes : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=roqeCIat3IY

    Yeah. I saw that one recently and it did look good, even better in your pic!

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #3060 - April 28th, 2024, 4:04 pm
    Post #3060 - April 28th, 2024, 4:04 pm Post #3060 - April 28th, 2024, 4:04 pm
    tonight is easy char siu pork, steamed rice buns, cucumber quick pickle, kewpie

    last night was Serious Eats swedish meatballs, and yukon gold mash with sour cream: soft food for the newly orthodontured kid

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