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Pastry triangles

Pastry triangles
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  • Pastry triangles

    Post #1 - June 12th, 2007, 9:09 am
    Post #1 - June 12th, 2007, 9:09 am Post #1 - June 12th, 2007, 9:09 am
    Are "pastry triangles" made with puff pastry? Would they replace puff pastry in a pinch?

    (I'm having trouble locating puff pastry, btw... there are rows and rows of phyllo dough but NO puff pastry)
    "Part of the secret of success in life is to eat what you want and let the food fight it out inside."
    -Mark Twain
  • Post #2 - June 12th, 2007, 10:05 am
    Post #2 - June 12th, 2007, 10:05 am Post #2 - June 12th, 2007, 10:05 am
    I don't know what "pastry triangles" are, but I thought Pepperidge Farms frozen puff pastry was available even at the most pitiful Jewel or Dominick's stote.
  • Post #3 - June 12th, 2007, 11:57 am
    Post #3 - June 12th, 2007, 11:57 am Post #3 - June 12th, 2007, 11:57 am
    I don't know if it's too far for you to go, but I buy my puff pastry at Marketplace on Oakton. It's labeled as something else (I think just "pastry dough,") but it's a square of dough about 1" thick and maybe 4" on a side, packaged in a clear wrapper. It's in the freezer between the ice cream and the myriad phyllo preps.

    The name "pastry triangles" makes me think you've got already-filled spanakopita.
  • Post #4 - June 12th, 2007, 1:34 pm
    Post #4 - June 12th, 2007, 1:34 pm Post #4 - June 12th, 2007, 1:34 pm
    Maybe they were called "pastry leaves"... They were shaped like a triangle though.

    I was just at Market Place yesterday and didn't see them, however, I was not in the freezer section, but the refrigerated section, where they also had phyllo dough. Next time I'll look in the freezer section, thanks for the tip!!

    nr706, I hadn't set foot in Dominick's in at least a month, but I went today just to see if they had any in stock. Nope, no puff pastry. One sad pie shell, and a couple dozen phyllo dough boxes, but no puff pastry. I'll look again at Jewel (which I haven't been to in three months) the next time I go to Trader Joe's. I do all of my grocery shopping at Harvestime/Lawrence, Aldi/Montrose, and Trader Joe's/Lincoln.
    "Part of the secret of success in life is to eat what you want and let the food fight it out inside."
    -Mark Twain
  • Post #5 - June 12th, 2007, 6:11 pm
    Post #5 - June 12th, 2007, 6:11 pm Post #5 - June 12th, 2007, 6:11 pm
    A staggering array of different brands and grades of Philo dough and probably one or two brands of puff pstry can be had at Lincolnwood Produce.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #6 - June 12th, 2007, 6:50 pm
    Post #6 - June 12th, 2007, 6:50 pm Post #6 - June 12th, 2007, 6:50 pm
    If they're the pastry leaves I'm thinking of at Oakton, I can attest that they're large triangles of phyllo that you can wrap something in, croissant-like.
  • Post #7 - June 13th, 2007, 5:10 pm
    Post #7 - June 13th, 2007, 5:10 pm Post #7 - June 13th, 2007, 5:10 pm
    real puff pastry (ie; made with butter) can be found at whole foods in the freezer. the brand is dafour, and its about $15 for one large sheet. what do you need it for? because filo dough can be used in many recipes that might call for puff paste.
  • Post #8 - June 16th, 2007, 9:22 am
    Post #8 - June 16th, 2007, 9:22 am Post #8 - June 16th, 2007, 9:22 am
    $15? Whoa, that sheet better be huge!

    I called two Jewels and found one that sells Pepperidge Farm puff pastry for $3.59. (The last time I'd gone to that store, which may have been close to Christmas, they were out.)

    What I do with it is make pain au chocolat - put a piece of bittersweet chocolate in the middle, roll it up, and bake it for 10 minutes 400 degrees.

    If a pastry leaf has a croissant-like effect, that could work. But one time I bought a chocolate croissant from Au Bon Pain and was not impressed.

    Thanks for the suggestions, guys.
    "Part of the secret of success in life is to eat what you want and let the food fight it out inside."
    -Mark Twain
  • Post #9 - June 16th, 2007, 10:08 am
    Post #9 - June 16th, 2007, 10:08 am Post #9 - June 16th, 2007, 10:08 am
    While in pastry school years ago, we were honored with the master baker from Heinemans as a guest speaker. He spoke at length about puff pastry in commercial production and the costs. As in everything in food, you can make it cheap or you can make it well, just not both. The lower priced versions are done with hydrogenated fats/waxes by machine, from there we move up the scale all the way to hand done butter-based puff pastry. There are many products in between, the price, and a read of the ingredients should answer the question of value.

    Patrick
  • Post #10 - June 16th, 2007, 3:23 pm
    Post #10 - June 16th, 2007, 3:23 pm Post #10 - June 16th, 2007, 3:23 pm
    The stuff at Marketplace is definitely made with some kind of artificial fat (I'm an ingredient reader) but it would work really well for a faux pan au chocolate. I think it's less than $4 for a block.

    The pastry leaves with chocolate would make an interesting dessert, but it would be very different - they make a rolled thing more remeniscent of a phyllo "purse" (and you'd have to watch to make sure the pastry cooks before the chocolate burns, because it won't provide much insulation. Both are good to have in your freezer in a pinch, though.
  • Post #11 - June 18th, 2007, 4:30 pm
    Post #11 - June 18th, 2007, 4:30 pm Post #11 - June 18th, 2007, 4:30 pm
    nickzen wrote:There are many products in between, the price, and a read of the ingredients should answer the question of value.

    Patrick


    You're absolutely right. Plus, I'm being sort of a hypocrite, because I won't buy margarine. So today I tried out Molly Steven's recipe for "rough puff pastry" which turned out a lot like pie crust. It needed to rest in the fridge for a good long while before it worked out.

    Oh well, thanks for the help, guys.
    "Part of the secret of success in life is to eat what you want and let the food fight it out inside."
    -Mark Twain
  • Post #12 - June 18th, 2007, 6:48 pm
    Post #12 - June 18th, 2007, 6:48 pm Post #12 - June 18th, 2007, 6:48 pm
    Saint,

    Were you pleased with your rough or "Blitz" dough?

    If you successfully made blitz dough, then you are closer to your own homemade puff pastry dough than you might think.

    :twisted:
    "Bass Trombone is the Lead Trumpet of the Deep."
    Rick Hammett
  • Post #13 - June 18th, 2007, 7:02 pm
    Post #13 - June 18th, 2007, 7:02 pm Post #13 - June 18th, 2007, 7:02 pm
    I've made my own puff pastry a number of times. It's really pretty easy, but it takes time. I use a Jacques Pepin recipe, which is basically flour and water for the dough, roll it out, put some cool butter in the middle, wrap the dough around the butter, and roll it out. Then chill it, fold it over and roll it out. Then chill it, fold it over and roll it out. Then chill it, fold it over and roll it out. Then chill it, fold it over and roll it out. Then chill it, fold it over and roll it out. Repeat ad infinitum.

    Takes some time, but at least you know there are no unwanted ingredients. And it freezes pretty well.
  • Post #14 - June 27th, 2007, 6:50 am
    Post #14 - June 27th, 2007, 6:50 am Post #14 - June 27th, 2007, 6:50 am
    EvilRonnie,
    I think I didn't fold it enough times - I was too worried about "overworking" it (which all pastry recipes warn against). It turned out a lot like pie dough. Also, I discovered that bittersweet chocolate chips are not a good substitute for baking chocolate bars - you need the bars to provide the height in the recipe.

    Nr706, maybe I'll try Pepin's next time. The rough or "blitz" added all of the ingredients at once. I wonder if using Pepin's method of just water & flour first might work better.

    If anyone has any thoughts on how to know when dough is overworked, let me know.

    iirc, the Pepperidge Farm puff pastry that I used last year had a stretchy quality to it, which makes me wonder if overworking the dough is not that bad of a thing to do.
    "Part of the secret of success in life is to eat what you want and let the food fight it out inside."
    -Mark Twain
  • Post #15 - June 27th, 2007, 8:43 am
    Post #15 - June 27th, 2007, 8:43 am Post #15 - June 27th, 2007, 8:43 am
    I'm sure Evil Ronnie, jazzfood, and some of the other pros here know better than I do, but I'm guessing that, unlike other pastry doughs, there's no real downside to developing the gluten by working the dough for a puff pastry; in fact it's hard to avoid when you're doing so many turns when you're repeatedly folding and rolling out the dough. (I suppose by using a very low protein flour, you could avoid developing the gluten, but I've never tried it; I've always used regular ol' AP flour.) And it's probably advantageous to have decent gluten structure, so each layer (which is ultimately well less than a millimeter thick) will stay separate from the fat, producing the flaky layers that the whole exercise is all about.
  • Post #16 - June 27th, 2007, 2:40 pm
    Post #16 - June 27th, 2007, 2:40 pm Post #16 - June 27th, 2007, 2:40 pm
    As far as making regular puff pastry, this is correct. The keys are to keep the butter cold and to rest the dough sufficiently between turns/folds, in order to relax the gluten and make the dough easier to roll out, which makes the folding easier. If you don't rest it, it will resist the rolling and spring back.

    With rough puff, the pie crust effect could be due to lack of folding, or also due to the butter flakes getting too small or warm and therefore being too well mixed with the flour.

    Of course, pain au chocolate should be made with croissant dough, not puff pastry
  • Post #17 - April 7th, 2021, 8:58 am
    Post #17 - April 7th, 2021, 8:58 am Post #17 - April 7th, 2021, 8:58 am
    Hi,

    I ploughed through a lot of posts until I found some mention of making your own puff pastry.

    All this so I can link for anyone's future use a King Arthur recipe for rye puff pastry, which could be useful for someone.

    It is a rough puff, that quite often works out just fine. Plus it can be done in 1 hour 15 minutes or less time spent calling or trudging stores for something not quite like it.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
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