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Best Cauliflower I Ever Ate

Best Cauliflower I Ever Ate
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  • Post #31 - September 30th, 2004, 5:25 pm
    Post #31 - September 30th, 2004, 5:25 pm Post #31 - September 30th, 2004, 5:25 pm
    jlawrence01 wrote:I do not care what the Pork Council says. Most consumers (inclusing those aware of the changes in pork production) will reject pork unless it is cooked to the point where *ALL* the pinkness is out of the meat.

    Seen it in person.


    Jlawrence01,

    I'm sure you're right...but we're not "most consumers," are we?

    Hammond
  • Post #32 - September 30th, 2004, 11:06 pm
    Post #32 - September 30th, 2004, 11:06 pm Post #32 - September 30th, 2004, 11:06 pm
    Mmmm...in an odd sort of confluence of two issues that arose in this thread, I grilled up some pork tenderloins last night marinaded and sauced according to another recipe in this month's Saveur (on Ole Miss tailgating--and no, despite being an avid college football fan, I don't know why I get emotionally involved).

    I cooked up the pork tenderloins about medium rare. The thinner ends were nearly white straight through, but the thicker ends had a wonderful fleshy pinkness in the center. Delicious. And the jezebel sauce was a pretty nice accompaniment. Mashed potatoes, Swiss chard. That's good eatin'.

    Cheers,

    Aaron
  • Post #33 - October 1st, 2004, 11:07 am
    Post #33 - October 1st, 2004, 11:07 am Post #33 - October 1st, 2004, 11:07 am
    I cooked up the pork tenderloins about medium rare. The thinner ends were nearly white straight through, but the thicker ends had a wonderful fleshy pinkness in the center. Delicious. And the jezebel sauce was a pretty nice accompaniment. Mashed potatoes, Swiss chard. That's good eatin'.


    Aaron,

    Prior to reading this exchange, would you have cooked it to medium rare? What was your taste impression of the white straight through, was it as tasty as the meat which was more temperately cooked?

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #34 - October 1st, 2004, 11:23 am
    Post #34 - October 1st, 2004, 11:23 am Post #34 - October 1st, 2004, 11:23 am
    Cathy2 wrote:Prior to reading this exchange, would you have cooked it to medium rare? What was your taste impression of the white straight through, was it as tasty as the meat which was more temperately cooked?


    Good question, and I honestly don't know. You know, I don't think I've cooked a pork loin or tenderloin or chop in, gosh, maybe a year or more. No good reason for this really, though I think in part it's because I've had a tendency to overcook in the past. A friend moved to Tehran for a few months, and it made some sense to offer pork as his departing dinner. The Saveur article was the clincher. The point is, I've been thinking for some time, and read things about the grand tradition of overcooking pork, that made me determined to cook the pork a little pink. And when I've eaten pork at restaurants, I've noticed a little more pink than in the past. I wouldn't say this thread changed my mind any, but I wouldn't rule out a subtle, reinforcing influence.

    As to whether the whiter part tasted different, you know, that's a good question, and it didn't even occur to me to find out. I gave the more cooked parts to Kate, who was a bit more squeamish about the pink.

    Cheers,

    Aaron
  • Post #35 - October 1st, 2004, 11:26 am
    Post #35 - October 1st, 2004, 11:26 am Post #35 - October 1st, 2004, 11:26 am
    Depending upon who I am serving the meat to, I typically cook a pork roast to either 140 then letting it rest allowing the temperature to rise to 145 (for TPA and me) and 150 to my parents who are getting far less sqeamish about pink pork.
    MAG
    www.monogrammeevents.com

    "I've never met a pork product I didn't like."
  • Post #36 - October 2nd, 2004, 9:28 am
    Post #36 - October 2nd, 2004, 9:28 am Post #36 - October 2nd, 2004, 9:28 am
    Aaron Deacon wrote:I cooked up the pork tenderloins about medium rare. The thinner ends were nearly white straight through, but the thicker ends had a wonderful fleshy pinkness in the center. Delicious. And the jezebel sauce was a pretty nice accompaniment. Mashed potatoes, Swiss chard. That's good eatin'.


    Aaron,

    The Saveur recipe for Grilled Pork Tenderloin with Jezebel Sauce was interesting, particularly for the Jezebel Sauce (horseradish, pineapple preserves, etc). Also of major note, to me, was the Breakfast Casserole --I'll tell you, I looked at the picture before going to sleep for several nights, and now, with the weather cooling, I will make it sometime soon.

    Hammond
  • Post #37 - October 2nd, 2004, 10:32 am
    Post #37 - October 2nd, 2004, 10:32 am Post #37 - October 2nd, 2004, 10:32 am
    the Breakfast Casserole


    Is this breakfast casserole a new concept for you? Or you were interested simply in that particular recipe?

    When I used to do more 'Church Lady' type activities some years ago, these Breakfast Casseroles were a retreat type dish. There would be a dinner on Saturday night, leftover bread from this dinner (and maybe ham) would be recycled into a Sunday morning Breakfast Casserole.

    I have several recipes in my files I have clipped over the years. So I have been familiar with this dish for a long time. However, there is a preference in my family for pancakes and waffles over custard-type casseroles, so I have never made it for the home crowd.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #38 - October 2nd, 2004, 10:40 am
    Post #38 - October 2nd, 2004, 10:40 am Post #38 - October 2nd, 2004, 10:40 am
    Cathy2 wrote:
    the Breakfast Casserole


    Is this breakfast casserole a new concept for you? Or you were interested simply in that particular recipe?


    C2,

    Well, breakfast casserole is not exactly a new concept to me, but it's something we almost never have at our house, mainly because it's something my kids would not like (they're more cinnamon toast people). Now, with most of my children living elsewhere, I can start thinking about what I want for breakfast, and what I want is a big messy heap o' baked eggs with loose sausage, mustard, crumbled up bread, etc.

    Church lady, hunh? That sounds like a side of C2 few of us have seen.

    Hammond
  • Post #39 - October 5th, 2004, 8:22 am
    Post #39 - October 5th, 2004, 8:22 am Post #39 - October 5th, 2004, 8:22 am
    David Hammond wrote:The Saveur recipe for Grilled Pork Tenderloin with Jezebel Sauce was interesting, particularly for the Jezebel Sauce (horseradish, pineapple preserves, etc). Also of major note, to me, was the Breakfast Casserole --I'll tell you, I looked at the picture before going to sleep for several nights, and now, with the weather cooling, I will make it sometime soon.


    Yeah, that Jezebel Sauce was pretty darn tasty. I really like it when you're planning to make something (e.g., pork tenderloin) and you happen across a recipe that fits the bill so precisely. We don't do Breakfast Casserole too often, but I know Kate had her eye on that recipe as well.

    Mostly, that article awakened a previously latent desire to attend a Saturday tilt at Ole Miss. Having grown up in Nebraska, I know a thing or two about fanatical college football fans, but my sense is that down in SEC country, they take it to a whole new level. I know we have at least an Auburn alum on here--ever tailgate at the Grove, Kman?

    Cheers,

    Aaron
  • Post #40 - October 10th, 2004, 3:55 pm
    Post #40 - October 10th, 2004, 3:55 pm Post #40 - October 10th, 2004, 3:55 pm
    David H, the Sicilians make a cauliflower dish something like Cathy2's called pasta chi vrocculi arriminati. You can use either the regular white kind or "broccoliflower." Cook the cauliflower a minute or two less than you like it. Chop into 3/4" dice. Saute a medium onion diced, add 1 Tbs pine nuts, 1Tbs raisins (I like yellow, but either's fine: soak a few minutes in warm water first), 4-6 anchovy filets, a pinch of saffron disolved in a little hot water, and a pinch of hot red pepper. Add the cooked cauliflower, toss with your favorite pasta (I like rigatoni or cavatappi). To top, pan toast bread crumbs and sprinkle over instead of cheese. The Sicilians call these "muddica" (molliche in Italian). I'd drink a Fiano di Avellino or Insolia with this.
  • Post #41 - October 10th, 2004, 8:56 pm
    Post #41 - October 10th, 2004, 8:56 pm Post #41 - October 10th, 2004, 8:56 pm
    Choey,

    I read your recipe just as I was going downstairs to make dinner -- perfect timing!

    I liked this dish a lot -- it's surprising (at least to me) how excellently pine nuts complement anchovies. We used white cauliflower, but broccoflower would have been better, from a visual perspective (more contrast). The red pepper is a nice touch.

    Hammond
  • Post #42 - October 10th, 2004, 9:52 pm
    Post #42 - October 10th, 2004, 9:52 pm Post #42 - October 10th, 2004, 9:52 pm
    the roasted cauliflower recipies are similar to a recipie in the Zuni cookbook, by Judy Rogers. This is one of my favorite cookbooks, She roasts either cauliflower or broccoli or both with breadcrumbs, fennel, red pepper flakes, anchovies, black olives, olive oil. I have done it many times with just the cauliflower. Great roasted taste that isn't there with the "vanilla" way of cooking it
  • Post #43 - February 20th, 2021, 10:35 am
    Post #43 - February 20th, 2021, 10:35 am Post #43 - February 20th, 2021, 10:35 am
    At Cathy's instigation from an off-topic Jewel grocery discussion, reviving this slightly-off-topic pork discussion with an update 16 years later:

    The Pork Checkoff - People. Pigs. Planet. (love that slogan, really all you need in life) now suggests the 145F is cooked enough for pork.

    I think what confuses consumers is that pork can be delicious cooked to medium-rare or medium, or cooked to very well done (over 190F, like pulled pork or falling-off-the-bone ribs) but there's a big in-between range where it becomes dry and tough.

    The 140F recommendation must be for heating pre-cooked smoked ham, which is all the ham most people would encounter.

    =========

    And now for my "best cauliflower" recipe, based on giardiniera:
    Wash and trim one head's worth of cauliflower florets into bite size pieces. In a covered bowl, add enough cold water to fully cover cauliflower. Add 1/2 cup of canning or fine sea salt. Stir to dissolve salt - it will take a lot of stirring or shaking. Refrigerate overnight.

    Pour off brine and rinse at least twice to remove excess saltiness. Add 1/2 cup white wine vinegar, 1/2 tsp oregano or mixed Italian herbs, several grinds of black pepper, and 1/4 tsp (or to taste) red pepper flakes, 1 Tbsp olive oil, and enough cold water to cover the cauliflower. Refrigerate for several hours.

    Use a slotted spoon to remove desired servings. The remaining cauliflower will keep for at least a week.
  • Post #44 - February 21st, 2021, 10:29 am
    Post #44 - February 21st, 2021, 10:29 am Post #44 - February 21st, 2021, 10:29 am
    tjr wrote:At Cathy's instigation from an off-topic Jewel grocery discussion, reviving this slightly-off-topic pork discussion with an update 16 years later:

    The Pork Checkoff - People. Pigs. Planet. (love that slogan, really all you need in life) now suggests the 145F is cooked enough for pork.

    I think what confuses consumers is that pork can be delicious cooked to medium-rare or medium, or cooked to very well done (over 190F, like pulled pork or falling-off-the-bone ribs) but there's a big in-between range where it becomes dry and tough.


    It's nice seeing this thread 16-ish years later (though the pork side topic is not one I expected), as it seems general acceptance of pink in pork has progressed. I don't know if it's a majority of consumers yet or not, but seems to me that a lot more people are fine with lower levels of doneness in pork, and pretty much all the mainstream recipes for cuts like tenderloin these days recommend cooking it to levels that are pink, if not quite as pink as 145F.

    That said, the in-between range you describe above, that is more to do with the cut of pork you are cooking than the temp itself. Tenderloin or loin cooked to 190F+ is still dry as hell, even if it falls apart. Pork shoulder can go either way, but it tends to be chewy -- at least to me -- at the lower levels of doneness, so that I will almost always take to 185+ where its collagen-y/gelatin-y goodness can be appreciated. You know, in beef terms, it's like cooking something like a filet or porterhouse vs a chuck.
  • Post #45 - February 21st, 2021, 10:47 am
    Post #45 - February 21st, 2021, 10:47 am Post #45 - February 21st, 2021, 10:47 am
    HI,

    This one thread stood out in my mind, because MAG's parents were not comfortable with pink (formerly undercooked) pork. It took a while for my family to get used to this notion, too.

    I now apologize if I overcook (formerly the ideal temperature) pork.

    Frankly, when pigs were let loose on the streets to eat anything they came upon, their meat may just be begging for higher cooking temperatures.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #46 - February 21st, 2021, 11:44 am
    Post #46 - February 21st, 2021, 11:44 am Post #46 - February 21st, 2021, 11:44 am
    Good point. I've heard that hog farmers of today are more concerned about humans passing their germs to the pigs than pig germs getting into humans!
  • Post #47 - February 21st, 2021, 2:49 pm
    Post #47 - February 21st, 2021, 2:49 pm Post #47 - February 21st, 2021, 2:49 pm
    The old cooking temperatures for pork were to kill trichinia, which cause trichinosis in humans. Think little parasitic worms that can go from the digestive track to muscles. Animals eating raw meat can transmit the pests. Bears and raccoons are known carriers.

    The problems with pork date back to the days when pigs were frequently fed raw garbage. If memory serves correctly, regulations requiring steam treatment or cooking garbage fed to pigs went into effect in the late 1950s to 1960s and drastically reduced trichinosis from pork. New Jersey was a major source of garbage-fed pork IIRC. Whatever the problems caused by raising pigs in confinement, it essentially eliminated the danger of trichinosis from commercial pork.
  • Post #48 - February 21st, 2021, 2:56 pm
    Post #48 - February 21st, 2021, 2:56 pm Post #48 - February 21st, 2021, 2:56 pm
    Yes, trichinosis is pretty rare in modern pork and, also, trichinosis is killed at 137F, so at 145F, you're several degrees past safe for that particular pathogen.
  • Post #49 - February 25th, 2021, 10:25 am
    Post #49 - February 25th, 2021, 10:25 am Post #49 - February 25th, 2021, 10:25 am
    I think I like cauliflower better than broccoli. My favorite dish is aloo gobi, which is a potato and cauliflower curry. I order that every time I go to an Indian restaurant. I've yet to perfect it at home.
    Toria

    "I like this place and willingly could waste my time in it" - As You Like It,
    W. Shakespeare
  • Post #50 - February 25th, 2021, 1:18 pm
    Post #50 - February 25th, 2021, 1:18 pm Post #50 - February 25th, 2021, 1:18 pm
    Same here. I prefer cauliflower. It's probably growing up in a Polish household, where cauliflower was fairly common and broccoli rarely seen, but I also prefer the lighter, slightly nutty flavor of it to the more grassy and bitter flavor of broccoli. Texture-wise, cauliflower also appeals to me more, with its soft, rounded florets as opposed to the finer and more prickly broccoli tops.
  • Post #51 - February 26th, 2021, 8:42 am
    Post #51 - February 26th, 2021, 8:42 am Post #51 - February 26th, 2021, 8:42 am
    toria wrote:I think I like cauliflower better than broccoli. My favorite dish is aloo gobi, which is a potato and cauliflower curry. I order that every time I go to an Indian restaurant. I've yet to perfect it at home.

    I'm not a big fan, ever since the whiteout incident when I was a teenager (my mother made dinner that was whitefish, mashed potatoes and cauliflower). I'm of the opinion that there's only one thing that cauliflower is better at than broccoli, and that's curry.

    Garlic, lemon and parmesan? Broccoli.
    Cheese sauce? Broccoli.
    Soup or quiche with cheddar? Broccoli.
    Roasted with olive oil? Broccoli.
    Raw in salad? Broccoli.

    (ok, maybe you can't rice broccoli, but you're not ricing cauliflower because you like cauliflower)
    (hmm... maybe I'll add pickled)
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #52 - February 26th, 2021, 10:51 am
    Post #52 - February 26th, 2021, 10:51 am Post #52 - February 26th, 2021, 10:51 am
    JoelF wrote:[I'm of the opinion that there's only one thing that cauliflower is better at than broccoli, and that's curry.

    Garlic, lemon and parmesan? Broccoli.
    Cheese sauce? Broccoli.
    Soup or quiche with cheddar? Broccoli.
    Roasted with olive oil? Broccoli.
    Raw in salad? Broccoli.

    (ok, maybe you can't rice broccoli, but you're not ricing cauliflower because you like cauliflower)
    (hmm... maybe I'll add pickled)


    Cauliflower is the base of some exceptional soups. My wife make a delicious blue cheese and cauliflower soup and I recently started making a pureed cauliflower/white bean soup that is delicious and pretty healthy.

    The master of the roasted head of cauliflower, Eyal Shani, has served it as a featured appetizer for well over a decade in his restaurants. It's the first thing I order when I go there. Locally, Libanais makes a dish of cauliflower stewed in a tomato sauce that is pretty simple and outstanding.
  • Post #53 - February 26th, 2021, 5:09 pm
    Post #53 - February 26th, 2021, 5:09 pm Post #53 - February 26th, 2021, 5:09 pm
    spinynorman99 wrote:Cauliflower is the base of some exceptional soups.


    One of my favorite soups as a kid was a Polish cauliflower soup that's fairly simple: cauliflower, carrots, potato, onion, dill, sour cream (or regular cream) on a chicken broth. You don't need to gussy it up with cheese. Just keep the flavors pure, and it is delicious. Mom would make it once every week or two and I, even as an 8-year-old, loved it.
  • Post #54 - November 14th, 2021, 3:20 pm
    Post #54 - November 14th, 2021, 3:20 pm Post #54 - November 14th, 2021, 3:20 pm
    Hi,

    I over bought vegetables to the extent all refrigerator capacity is used.

    Lunch today was my second stab at cauliflower steaks. I panfried cauliflower steaks rather unsuccessfully a few years ago. This time I cooked them in a 450 F oven dressed in olive oil, pepper and salt. After dribbling olive oil on the cauliflower, I used a brush to make sure the top was coated evenly. These roasted for 40 minutes. Just as I was about to turn off the heat, I sprinkled mozarella that melted and browned by the residual oven heat.

    We ate these along with asparagus, a cucumber sauce and a vegetable heavy risotto kit bought at Woodman's. Curiosity sated by the risotto kit, it just did not come anywhere near to being risotto.

    Regards,
    CAthy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast

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