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Christmas Eve/Day traditions & menus

Christmas Eve/Day traditions & menus
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  • Which is the big day for you?
    Christmas Eve
    55%
    21
    Christmas Day
    29%
    11
    Neither/Other (please explain)
    16%
    6
    Total votes : 38
  • Christmas Eve/Day traditions & menus

    Post #1 - November 28th, 2007, 1:42 pm
    Post #1 - November 28th, 2007, 1:42 pm Post #1 - November 28th, 2007, 1:42 pm
    Just wondering what everyone has planned....

    I'm thinking Prime Rib for the day...not sure for the Eve.
  • Post #2 - November 28th, 2007, 2:25 pm
    Post #2 - November 28th, 2007, 2:25 pm Post #2 - November 28th, 2007, 2:25 pm
    Liz in Norwood Park wrote:Just wondering what everyone has planned....

    I'm thinking Prime Rib for the day...not sure for the Eve.


    Christmas Eve was always our big time. My dad would roast a turkey for sandwiches, I'd make Swedish meatballs, and mom would make chilled boiled shrimp among other things and we would set out a Smorgasbord, invite friends and neighbors over in the early afternoon, then kick them out, clean up and open presents. After that it was off to our cousin's house for more food and presents, and then back home at about 3AM. We didn't do anything on Christmas Day.

    Nowadays, it's Lobster at Chinn's for Christmas Eve, and the In-laws for Ham on Christmas Day. I miss having the turkey, I'll probably try to fit that in somewhere.
    "Good stuff, Maynard." Dobie Gillis
  • Post #3 - November 28th, 2007, 2:54 pm
    Post #3 - November 28th, 2007, 2:54 pm Post #3 - November 28th, 2007, 2:54 pm
    HI,

    You may want to refer to this post
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #4 - November 28th, 2007, 5:08 pm
    Post #4 - November 28th, 2007, 5:08 pm Post #4 - November 28th, 2007, 5:08 pm
    Thanks for that link...but I'd still be interested to hear what people are currently doing/cooking :)
  • Post #5 - November 28th, 2007, 5:39 pm
    Post #5 - November 28th, 2007, 5:39 pm Post #5 - November 28th, 2007, 5:39 pm
    Hi,

    Information added to an existing thread does update it.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #6 - November 28th, 2007, 9:40 pm
    Post #6 - November 28th, 2007, 9:40 pm Post #6 - November 28th, 2007, 9:40 pm
    I am thinking of making Italian instead of a turkey. Maybe lasagna, a green salad, garlic bread, and some anitpasti and other appetizers. I need something in addition to the lasagna but nothing you have to boil and assemble at the last minute. Everything has to be in baking dishes in the oven or kept warm in the crock pot to avoid last minute food fiascos.
    Toria

    "I like this place and willingly could waste my time in it" - As You Like It,
    W. Shakespeare
  • Post #7 - November 29th, 2007, 8:26 pm
    Post #7 - November 29th, 2007, 8:26 pm Post #7 - November 29th, 2007, 8:26 pm
    Our family Christmas Eve is filled with tradition- a mishmash of Slovak and picky kids over the years, and god HELP you if you try to change any of it.

    The nights starts with my father (the oldest man in the family) throwing walnuts in four corners, in the sign of the cross, which are then chased down and exchanged for a dollar bill by the four youngest people present. I just got knocked out of this by my husband last year. Jerk. Then we pass trays of nuts and apples. After that comes "cardboard" (I really don't know how to spell it, oplowtke?)- unleavened bread with honey. After that comes the absolute weirdest, most Charlie Brown Thanksgiving meal you can possibly imagine:

    your choice of bean or mushroom soup

    then
    fried fish
    mushroom paprikas and haluskis
    spaghetti (???, so random)
    french fries (which came about for a super-picky cousin)

    Once my mom brought cheese ravioli instead of spaghetti and I thought my cousins were going to chase her out of the room with pitchforks and torches.

    Like I said, totally random meal. I look forward to it all year long :)
  • Post #8 - November 30th, 2007, 1:28 am
    Post #8 - November 30th, 2007, 1:28 am Post #8 - November 30th, 2007, 1:28 am
    With my family following Polish traditions, Christmas Eve has always been the big day, and also the day when we open our presents. Our traditional Christmas Eve menu has always been meatless. A typical spread would include: pickled herring, borscht (made on a meatless stock) served with porcini-stuffed uszka (Polish tortellini), fried fish, gołąbki (cabbage rolls) stuffed with rice or buckwheat and porcini, mashed potatoes, pierogi of various types (usually ruskie [potato and farmer's cheese], sauerkraut, and mushroom), sauerkraut cooked with lentils, dried fruit compote (served as a drink), and probably some other stuff I'm forgetting.
  • Post #9 - November 30th, 2007, 7:48 am
    Post #9 - November 30th, 2007, 7:48 am Post #9 - November 30th, 2007, 7:48 am
    We used to do the Polish traditional Christmas Eve too. I still have the pierogi & the mushroom soup & the Oplatek, but since I developed an allergy to fish I can't do the herring anymore (& I really miss it, my Mother used to get the milkers from the fishmonger & soak them for 3 days, then pickle them herself...smelly kitchen but delicious end result!) And we had the poppyseed roll, too. Although now I make poppyseed bread instead.

    I had forgotten about the kompote! Do you have a recipe for it? That used to be my favorite part of the meal.

    I guess I will be having a Polish Wigilia again this year (in my own fashion, that is). I always think I'm going to do something else, but I just can't give it up I guess.
  • Post #10 - November 30th, 2007, 2:13 pm
    Post #10 - November 30th, 2007, 2:13 pm Post #10 - November 30th, 2007, 2:13 pm
    We do Wigilia as well.
    The clown is down!
  • Post #11 - November 30th, 2007, 2:36 pm
    Post #11 - November 30th, 2007, 2:36 pm Post #11 - November 30th, 2007, 2:36 pm
    This year our big day will be Christmas Day. My inlaws and my parents are out of town so we're spending the eve alone. However on Christmas day, everyone will be back in town and will be celebrating with us over the feast I am cooking up:

    **TENTATIVE FAMILY CHRISTMAS MENU for 14-16**
    Appetizers:
    - crab pouches
    - brie & cranberry chutney en croute
    - Cheese/sausage/fruit platter w/Crackers
    - Gruyere, Chicken & Artichoke Dip
    - Garlic Crostini
    - Shrimp Cocktail Platter

    Traditional Fare:
    - Garlic Prime Rib Roast
    - Pineapple Glazed Spiral Ham
    - Steamed King Crab Legs
    - Cranberry & Candied Walnut Spinach Salad
    - Roasted Asparagus w/proscuitto
    - Horseradish Mashed Potatoes w/beef gravy
    - Wild Rice & Mushroom Pilaf
    - Brown Sugar Carrots
    - Hawaiian Sweet Dinner Rolls

    Non-Traditional Fare:
    - Pork Wonton Soup
    - Pancit/ Rice noodle dish
    - Shumai or Potstickers
    - Satay skewers: pork, shrimp & chicken

    Desserts:
    - Holiday Cheesecake
    - Peppermint Truffle Brownie Bites
    - Cranberry & Ginger Bars

    Misc:
    - Wine Bar
    - Coffee & hot chocolate bar
  • Post #12 - December 2nd, 2007, 4:54 pm
    Post #12 - December 2nd, 2007, 4:54 pm Post #12 - December 2nd, 2007, 4:54 pm
    Shrimp on the beach in Melaque, Mexico
  • Post #13 - December 2nd, 2007, 6:34 pm
    Post #13 - December 2nd, 2007, 6:34 pm Post #13 - December 2nd, 2007, 6:34 pm
    foodie1 wrote:This year our big day will be Christmas Day. My inlaws and my parents are out of town so we're spending the eve alone. However on Christmas day, everyone will be back in town and will be celebrating with us over the feast I am cooking up:


    Foodie I,
    After reading your Thanksgiving menu and now your proposed Christmas list, I am left with no alternative but to ask that I be adopted into your family :lol:

    Jyoti
    Jyoti
    A meal, with bread and wine, shared with friends and family is among the most essential and important of all human rituals.
    Ruhlman
  • Post #14 - December 2nd, 2007, 7:25 pm
    Post #14 - December 2nd, 2007, 7:25 pm Post #14 - December 2nd, 2007, 7:25 pm
    Jyoti, you can go to Foodie 1's house. I think I'll head to that beach with dukesdad. :)
  • Post #15 - December 2nd, 2007, 9:34 pm
    Post #15 - December 2nd, 2007, 9:34 pm Post #15 - December 2nd, 2007, 9:34 pm
    To me, it is not the Christmas Season until Santa magically jumps from pocket one to two.
    Image

    Big but simple dinner on the eve with extended family. Early morning Christmas swag with the kids. If we have enough energy, late lunch at LTH.

    -ramon
  • Post #16 - December 3rd, 2007, 12:51 am
    Post #16 - December 3rd, 2007, 12:51 am Post #16 - December 3rd, 2007, 12:51 am
    What about Christmas breakfast, everyone?

    When I was growing up we had no set tradition except my Aunt Margie's sour cream/walnut coffee cake. But my daughter and I have our own tradition: Lund's Swedish Pancakes, whipped cream, fresh strawberries and lingonberry preserve with fresh orange juice. It is relatively light and can be enjoyed prior to a midday meal.
    Man : I can't understand how a poet like you can eat that stuff.
    T. S. Eliot: Ah, but you're not a poet.
  • Post #17 - December 3rd, 2007, 12:09 pm
    Post #17 - December 3rd, 2007, 12:09 pm Post #17 - December 3rd, 2007, 12:09 pm
    This year I am going to pretend to attempt the Feast of Seven Fishes common in many Sicilian homes on Christamas Eve. We are inviting the in-laws so hopefuly it goes well.


    Appetizer
    Crab dip
    Baked Shrimp
    Mussels in tomato broth

    Soup
    Cioppino

    Salad
    Grilled Tuna w/ Mixed Citrus Salad over Bib Lettuce

    Pasta
    Fettucini with a dill and smoked salmon sauce

    Main
    Roast Halibut with Zucchini and butter sauce
    Broccoli sauted w/ garlic oil

    Dessert
    Gelatto rolled in crushed amarettini and a splash of amaretto
  • Post #18 - December 4th, 2007, 1:31 pm
    Post #18 - December 4th, 2007, 1:31 pm Post #18 - December 4th, 2007, 1:31 pm
    Last year I hosted and did a big Scandinavian smorgasbord -- a mix of Swedish and Danish foods -- on Christmas eve.

    This year, my twin brother is hosting Christmas eve, so I'll just help out. (Although I will be bringing my cured leg of lamb that I've been posting about in the forum for the last few weeks. It's coming along nicely.)

    My younger brother will be hosting a party on December 23.

    And I will be hosting a Christmas morning brunch.

    Here's what I'm making:

    for hors-d'ouvres

    Gravlax with mustard dill sauce
    Prinzkorv (little Swedish cocktail sausages)
    Shrimp mini-quiches
    Mimosas and Bloody Marys

    at the table:

    Broiled Grapefruit halves

    Cheddar cheese souffle
    Roasted sweet potatoes with maple syrup glaze
    Thick cut bacon

    Two kinds of waffles: yeast-raised and gingerbread
    Butterscotch pears
    Ligonberry preserves
  • Post #19 - December 4th, 2007, 2:46 pm
    Post #19 - December 4th, 2007, 2:46 pm Post #19 - December 4th, 2007, 2:46 pm
    I just have to say that I am so loving this thread!

    It's always interesting to me to see how other people celebrate the holidays...but especially at this time of year when family traditions & influences run so deep.
  • Post #20 - December 4th, 2007, 3:13 pm
    Post #20 - December 4th, 2007, 3:13 pm Post #20 - December 4th, 2007, 3:13 pm
    Sparky weighs in on the subject in his very first essay, ever (note the emphasis on food)
    Image
  • Post #21 - December 4th, 2007, 4:26 pm
    Post #21 - December 4th, 2007, 4:26 pm Post #21 - December 4th, 2007, 4:26 pm
    All together now:

    AAAWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWW!

    That is so precious :)
  • Post #22 - December 11th, 2007, 2:28 pm
    Post #22 - December 11th, 2007, 2:28 pm Post #22 - December 11th, 2007, 2:28 pm
    OK, after killing this thread with cuteness, I figure I ought to be the one to resurrect it, as I have a conundrum.

    We will be hosting Christmas for 5 adults and 3 kids. Bossywas apparently a bit narrow-chested, but I'd still like to use the small rib roast (I believe it's either a small 3-bone or a large 2-bone) she offered.

    The question is, what do I serve along with so that all 8 of us carnivores are sated? I do have some plans from past Christmases:
    Quail eggs with sesame salt and tobiko
    Cheese Tray/crudites
    Watercress and pomegranate salad
    Roasted potatoes or Latkes, depending on how motivated I am
    Popovers (which the 'spouse will make)
    Pots de Creme a la Bracken
    Cake in our Hansel and Gretel bundt pan

    That's as far as I got...I need sides, I need meaty-type filling appetizers (don't think I want to do shrimp this year, but I might change my mind...)
  • Post #23 - December 11th, 2007, 2:50 pm
    Post #23 - December 11th, 2007, 2:50 pm Post #23 - December 11th, 2007, 2:50 pm
    Cocktail Meatballs!

    No, they aren't exciting, but you can make them in your Crockpot and everyone loves them. (You can make meatballs from Bossy or use frozen pre cooked ones)

    I like them on the sweet side with Bennett's Chili Sauce, Cranberry Jelly and a healthy shake of red pepper flakes.


    Another easy meaty item is mixed salamis from Riviera.

    You could make your potatoes more filling and still easy by making a simple Au Gratin. I made some that were simply heavy cream, garlic powder, and Gruyere layered and baked. They were sinfully rich, but simple and delicious. (And gluten free, which was a requirement for that day)
  • Post #24 - December 11th, 2007, 3:22 pm
    Post #24 - December 11th, 2007, 3:22 pm Post #24 - December 11th, 2007, 3:22 pm
    dvrstygrl wrote:This year I am going to pretend to attempt the Feast of Seven Fishes common in many Sicilian homes on Christamas Eve. We are inviting the in-laws so hopefuly it goes well.


    Appetizer
    Crab dip
    Baked Shrimp
    Mussels in tomato broth

    Soup
    Cioppino

    Salad
    Grilled Tuna w/ Mixed Citrus Salad over Bib Lettuce

    Pasta
    Fettucini with a dill and smoked salmon sauce

    Main
    Roast Halibut with Zucchini and butter sauce
    Broccoli sauted w/ garlic oil

    Dessert
    Gelatto rolled in crushed amarettini and a splash of amaretto


    If anybody has never experienced this feast that the Italian families put together on xmas eve, I say you have never lived. Of course, it has to do with the cooks preparing the meals, but if you have the fortune of getting together with a family that knows how to cook, you will await your xmas eve invitation every year like you waited for xmas morning when you were a kid. One of my favorite memories of one of these dinners I was invited to was easily one of the best fish dishes I had ever had up to that point of my life. Whitefish, spinach, bread crumbs, parmesan cheese, salt and pepper. Layered in a casserole dish like a lasagna. The mother would not tell me the secret until most of the other guests were gone.

    It was MICROWAVED!!! :shock:
    ...and then the top was toasted in the broiler to finish it off.

    Simple, plain, ultra fresh fish.
    I sh*t you not, it was sublime.

    I argued with her for at least half an hour that there was no way it was prepared in the microwave.
    We cannot be friends if you do not know the difference between Mayo and Miracle Whip.
  • Post #25 - December 26th, 2007, 10:59 am
    Post #25 - December 26th, 2007, 10:59 am Post #25 - December 26th, 2007, 10:59 am
    Menu roundup

    Quail eggs with sesame salt and tobiko A big hit with the little kids, as usual...didn't have time to make garnishes, but they snarfed up the eggs anyway.

    Cheese Tray/crudites Wedge of brie, a lovely cranberry Wensleydale, assorted sausages and homemade liver terrinewith pistachios (which tasted good but I need a thinner, taller pan)

    Excellent cheese dip à la SIL with pretzels

    Potato Chips and Tzaziki

    Watercress and pomegranate salad Big hit, even with the munchkins.

    Roasted potatoes or Latkes, Instead, I did halved roasted parslied potatoes, which were OK, somewhere between a baked and roasted potato. They were slow-cooked with the roast; I might have liked them better at a higher heat, but they got compliments from the family.

    Green beans with sweet-and-sour onions I used the pearl-size red onions and added a big shot of wine at the end, delicioius.

    Steamed peas

    Popovers I actually made a pretty good Yorkshire pudding instead, causing my brother to whip out my recently-gifted copy of the I Hate to Cook Book and read "We who hate to cook have a respect bordering on awe for the Good Cooks Who Like to Cook - those...people who can, and do, cook a prime rib and a Yorkshire pudding in a one-oven stove..." eliciting a chuckle from the rest of my family,:D

    Pots de Creme a la Bracken Stunningly good. Like ganache, served up in espresso cups. Took less than 5 minutes, not counting chilling time - I highly recommend it.

    Cake in our Hansel and Gretel bundt pan With minor repairs using scavanged muffin tops, it looked OK, but nobody ate it. I tasted some of the scraps and it was no loss.

    Assorted Christmas Cookies
  • Post #26 - December 23rd, 2020, 5:01 pm
    Post #26 - December 23rd, 2020, 5:01 pm Post #26 - December 23rd, 2020, 5:01 pm
    Hi,

    For the first time in a few years, I am creating a new Christmas eve menu.

    It's Feast of the Seven Fishes, though my choices may not be at any Italian home. It is driven by what I already have squirreled away plus a few things to buy:

    Appetizers
    Blini with salmon
    Creamed herring
    Tuna stuffed eggs

    Salad
    Octopus salad
    Cod liver salad

    Main
    Shrimp de Jonghe
    Asian Carp Cakes

    Dessert
    Coconut Cake


    Christmas Dinner

    Appetizers
    This and that leftover from the night before

    Soup
    Fermented beet soup with mushroom dumplings

    Main
    Rib Roast
    Mashed potatoes
    Popovers or Yorkshire pudding
    Chinese Brocolli (just as good as asparagus)
    Horseradish cream sauce

    Dessert
    Bûche de Noël
    Christmas cookies

    I will likely add some more vegetables.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #27 - December 23rd, 2020, 5:16 pm
    Post #27 - December 23rd, 2020, 5:16 pm Post #27 - December 23rd, 2020, 5:16 pm
    Cathy2,

    May I come over? Please??

    Have a great Christmas.

    JL
  • Post #28 - December 23rd, 2020, 6:24 pm
    Post #28 - December 23rd, 2020, 6:24 pm Post #28 - December 23rd, 2020, 6:24 pm
    jlawrence01 wrote:
    May I come over? Please??

    JL


    Of course... as long as you remain N95 masked at all times.
  • Post #29 - December 28th, 2020, 11:13 am
    Post #29 - December 28th, 2020, 11:13 am Post #29 - December 28th, 2020, 11:13 am
    Being half Sicilian we always do some form of the Feast of the Seven Fishes. Decided to go all out to close this wonderful year, much to the delight of the folks at Boston Market. Menu consisted of Smoked Salmon, Baked Clams, Fried Calamari, Mexican Shrimp Cocktails, Plain Seared Scallops, King Crab and Lobster Tails and Crème Brule for dessert. There were only 4 of us and all had been tested on Monday at the request of my 32 year old son. A great time was had by all.
    "I drink to make other people more interesting."
    Ernest Hemingway
  • Post #30 - December 28th, 2020, 1:22 pm
    Post #30 - December 28th, 2020, 1:22 pm Post #30 - December 28th, 2020, 1:22 pm
    Cathy, sounds great! How long did you ferment the beets? I’ll have to make that soup.

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