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  • Post #121 - June 29th, 2019, 11:38 am
    Post #121 - June 29th, 2019, 11:38 am Post #121 - June 29th, 2019, 11:38 am
    Wow, what a great site! Tnx Ronnie! ....but I can see it's going to be a time-spending black hole for me. Ouf. Just what I needed. Still and all, tnx Ronnie!

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #122 - June 29th, 2019, 12:31 pm
    Post #122 - June 29th, 2019, 12:31 pm Post #122 - June 29th, 2019, 12:31 pm
    Geo wrote:Wow, what a great site! Tnx Ronnie! ....but I can see it's going to be a time-spending black hole for me. Ouf. Just what I needed. Still and all, tnx Ronnie!

    Geo

    Don't thank me. Thank gastro gnome. And yes, it's a major rabbit hole. But at least now, I know how little I actually know! :D

    =R=
    There are many things that are legal that are not a great idea --Nick Shabazz

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #123 - November 29th, 2019, 9:16 am
    Post #123 - November 29th, 2019, 9:16 am Post #123 - November 29th, 2019, 9:16 am
    Korin is offering 15% off on knives until 12/31/19
    https://www.korin.com/
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #124 - November 29th, 2019, 10:55 pm
    Post #124 - November 29th, 2019, 10:55 pm Post #124 - November 29th, 2019, 10:55 pm
    Misen is offering a 25% off sale, site wide. Use coupon code
    HOLIDAY25. It has been extended through the weekend, so 11/30 & 12/1/2019. They seem to be automagically applying the discount without the need to enter the code. YMMV.

    This thread has convinced me to order from them, as well as a Misono from Korin.

    edited to update the sale dates and to say, I ordered the knives. The Korin sale, mentioned by G Wiv, includes free shipping on knives over $100, but you have to put in a code and be sure to select the UPS lower 48 state shipping.
  • Post #125 - December 3rd, 2019, 12:45 am
    Post #125 - December 3rd, 2019, 12:45 am Post #125 - December 3rd, 2019, 12:45 am
    I'm not a professional chef, cook, whatever the PC term is, I cook for me and occasionally for friends/neighbours. I'd like to improve my knife skills, but the classes I've seen around here, in Portland Oregon mostly, seem to be taught by a clerk at the kitchen store. Maybe they know their stuff, but I have no way to judge.

    So, does anyone here know of classes around here that I can trust, or Youtube videos that are trustworthy?

    Thanks for any guidance you can provide.
  • Post #126 - December 3rd, 2019, 12:49 am
    Post #126 - December 3rd, 2019, 12:49 am Post #126 - December 3rd, 2019, 12:49 am
    Xexo wrote:I'm not a professional chef, cook, whatever the PC term is, I cook for me and occasionally for friends/neighbours. I'd like to improve my knife skills, but the classes I've seen around here, in Portland Oregon mostly, seem to be taught by a clerk at the kitchen store. Maybe they know their stuff, but I have no way to judge.

    So, does anyone here know of classes around here that I can trust, or Youtube videos that are trustworthy?

    Thanks for any guidance you can provide.

    Poke around youtube. I'm confident you'll find many helpful videos. They won't all be great, though. That's for sure.

    =R=
    There are many things that are legal that are not a great idea --Nick Shabazz

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #127 - December 23rd, 2019, 11:30 am
    Post #127 - December 23rd, 2019, 11:30 am Post #127 - December 23rd, 2019, 11:30 am
    So I got my 3 Misen knives yesterday - paring/utility/chef's - really nice weight and feel. Only issue was the chef's had a small patch of pitting out towards the end on one side. Not horrible, but bad enough that it was easily visible to the naked eye. I've contacted them via email, response was quick - that they've had a large number of emails and would respond in 24-72 hours. Not sure how they will handle it, but I'll let you all know once I hear back....
  • Post #128 - December 23rd, 2019, 5:23 pm
    Post #128 - December 23rd, 2019, 5:23 pm Post #128 - December 23rd, 2019, 5:23 pm
    I've been very happy with the same Misen Knives three pack, the bread knife is a favorite!
  • Post #129 - January 11th, 2020, 7:16 pm
    Post #129 - January 11th, 2020, 7:16 pm Post #129 - January 11th, 2020, 7:16 pm
    Been jonesing for an old school carbon steel wood handled knife for a while, and I recently found some at an unlikely source: Townsends reenactment company out of Indiana sells a really nice set of hand forged carbon steel kitchen knives for reasonable prices (https://www.townsends.us/products/cooks ... 173-p-1325):
    Image

    In a previous life I was pretty heavily involved in the reenactment scene, and I know from experience that a lot of the stuff sold in that scene is costume quality only or just plain crap. But these knives are the real deal. The edges are sharp out of the box, the handles are solid (and beautiful with the tiger stripe wood), and the blades taper up to a pretty stout spine that makes them ideal for kitchen butchery tasks like taking apart a chicken.
    Image

    Despite the robust blades, the edges are more than fine enough for delicate cutting too. Scallions fell apart cleanly with with a rock chop, with no ragged edges or pieces sticking together:
    Image
    I'm very happy with these Townsends knives, which upon further digging I find out are made by an Indiana guy named Jeff White. The only caveats are that the blades must be hand dried like any carbon steel blade, and that the handles seem to be untreated wood and should probably be sealed so they don't soak up too much moisture. I strongly recommend these to anyone looking for a highly functional but old fashioned kitchen knife.
    Last edited by eating while walking on January 11th, 2020, 7:28 pm, edited 1 time in total.
  • Post #130 - January 11th, 2020, 7:21 pm
    Post #130 - January 11th, 2020, 7:21 pm Post #130 - January 11th, 2020, 7:21 pm
    eating while walking wrote:Been jonesing for an old school carbon steel wood handled knife for a while, and I recently found some at an unlikely source: Townsends reenactment company out of Indiana sells a really nice set of hand forged carbon steel kitchen knives for reasonable prices:
    Image

    In a previous life I was pretty heavily involved in the reenactment scene, and I know from experience that a lot of the stuff sold in that scene is costume quality only or just plain crap. But these knives are the real deal. The edges are sharp out of the box, the handles are solid (and beautiful with the tiger stripe wood), and the blades taper up to a pretty stout spine that makes them ideal for kitchen butchery tasks like taking apart a chicken.
    Image

    The edges are fine enough for delicate cutting too. Scallions fell apart cleanly with with a rock chop, with no ragged edges or pieces sticking together:
    Image
    I'm very happy with these Townsends knives, which upon further digging I find out are made by an Indiana guy named Jeff White. The only caveats are that the blades must be hand dried like any carbon steel blade, and that the handles seem to be untreated wood and should probably be sealed so they don't soak up too much moisture. I strongly recommend these to anyone looking for a highly functional but old fashioned kitchen knife.

    Very cool. Do you know what kind of steel they're made from?

    I would suggest Tru-Oil for those handles. Its main use is gun stocks but it does a great job on unfinished knife handles, too, and it won't alter their color very much at all.

    =R=
    There are many things that are legal that are not a great idea --Nick Shabazz

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #131 - January 12th, 2020, 8:04 am
    Post #131 - January 12th, 2020, 8:04 am Post #131 - January 12th, 2020, 8:04 am
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Very cool. Do you know what kind of steel they're made from?
    I would suggest Tru-Oil for those handles. Its main use is gun stocks but it does a great job on unfinished knife handles, too, and it won't alter their color very much at all.

    =R=

    Thanks for the Tru Oil tip Ronnie, I’ll check it out. These are made from 1095 steel I believe.
  • Post #132 - January 12th, 2020, 8:15 am
    Post #132 - January 12th, 2020, 8:15 am Post #132 - January 12th, 2020, 8:15 am
    Mineral oil ( You can get it at any drug store ) will also do a good job, but I imagine that the gun oil would do a better job.
  • Post #133 - January 12th, 2020, 8:52 am
    Post #133 - January 12th, 2020, 8:52 am Post #133 - January 12th, 2020, 8:52 am
    eating while walking wrote:Been jonesing for an old school carbon steel wood handled knife for a while, and I recently found some at an unlikely source: Townsends reenactment company out of Indiana sells a really nice set of hand forged carbon steel kitchen knives for reasonable prices (https://www.townsends.us/products/cooks ... 173-p-1325):
    Image

    In a previous life I was pretty heavily involved in the reenactment scene, and I know from experience that a lot of the stuff sold in that scene is costume quality only or just plain crap. But these knives are the real deal. The edges are sharp out of the box, the handles are solid (and beautiful with the tiger stripe wood), and the blades taper up to a pretty stout spine that makes them ideal for kitchen butchery tasks like taking apart a chicken.
    Image

    Despite the robust blades, the edges are more than fine enough for delicate cutting too. Scallions fell apart cleanly with with a rock chop, with no ragged edges or pieces sticking together:
    Image
    I'm very happy with these Townsends knives, which upon further digging I find out are made by an Indiana guy named Jeff White. The only caveats are that the blades must be hand dried like any carbon steel blade, and that the handles seem to be untreated wood and should probably be sealed so they don't soak up too much moisture. I strongly recommend these to anyone looking for a highly functional but old fashioned kitchen knife.


    Very cool. Thanks for the tip. For that price and free shipping, I'll be adding to my collection!

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