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So what is your homemade Chicago hotdog deal breaker?

So what is your homemade Chicago hotdog deal breaker?
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  • Post #31 - February 1st, 2008, 7:15 pm
    Post #31 - February 1st, 2008, 7:15 pm Post #31 - February 1st, 2008, 7:15 pm
    Mhays wrote:Joys of Eating the Road Less Traveled at Sticky Rice
    I've been wanting to do this, myself - though not all at once (or maybe they'd do appetizer-size portions?)


    Maybe you just need a few others present to share the joys with!

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #32 - February 2nd, 2008, 7:36 am
    Post #32 - February 2nd, 2008, 7:36 am Post #32 - February 2nd, 2008, 7:36 am
    Do I sense an all-insect field trip in the offing? My schedule slows up a bit in the next couple of months...
  • Post #33 - March 21st, 2021, 10:29 am
    Post #33 - March 21st, 2021, 10:29 am Post #33 - March 21st, 2021, 10:29 am
    HI,

    I am challenging myself to make my own hotdog buns. We almost always have hotdogs or brats in the freezer, though not always the buns.

    This morning, I found this blog on how to make Chicago Style Hot Dogs. What I really thought was great was his transforming an ordinary hotdog bun to a poppy seed bun:

    HOW TO MAKE A POPPYSEED BUN:
    Chicago Style Hot Dog Buns are specific in that they need to be eaten in a poppyseed bun. These can be kind of hard to find outside of Chicago so I went ahead and figured out a way to doctor up a regular hot dog bun.

    - Brush the buns with an egg wash. Place the buns on a baking sheet and brush the tops and sides with a beaten egg.
    - After that, Sprinkle. Add poppy seeds to all the parts of the bun that were brushed.
    - Bake. Bake in the oven to help set the egg wash and warm up the buns.

    My local Costco sells the Mary Ann buns without the poppy seeds. The only Costco location selling the poppy seed Mary Ann buns is south of Midway Airport.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #34 - March 21st, 2021, 1:58 pm
    Post #34 - March 21st, 2021, 1:58 pm Post #34 - March 21st, 2021, 1:58 pm
    Hi,

    While looking at videos for shaping hot dog buns, I found this vlog on making hot dog buns in an hour. It takes longer than that, though this recipe is pretty direct.

    Today when I made hot dog buns, I knew they should be pulled at 209 or just under. When the timer went off to the time suggested in the recipe, the thermometer read 176 degrees. I closed the door to let them continue cooking.



    The resulting bun was soft and fresh. Fresh is just about never how any hot dog bun is described. Already I feel making it at home has benefits over store bought.


    Image

    We used some for lobster rolls. The real test is when we slip in a hot dog. Top split or side split, we can decide on the fly. I think I might make them smaller the next time. Perhaps yield 10 from this batch next time instead of eight.

    Regards,
    CAthy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #35 - March 21st, 2021, 8:41 pm
    Post #35 - March 21st, 2021, 8:41 pm Post #35 - March 21st, 2021, 8:41 pm
    Hi, Cathy, the ones in the video look really tasty. A couple questions:

    Did you shape yours as Chef Lola does? I've found that method yields buns that are more football-shaped than cylindrical. How were yours?

    Did the unscalded milk caused the buns to stale quickly? I think we learned that in my one college food science class. That was a long time ago, though.
  • Post #36 - March 21st, 2021, 9:24 pm
    Post #36 - March 21st, 2021, 9:24 pm Post #36 - March 21st, 2021, 9:24 pm
    tjr wrote:Did you shape yours as Chef Lola does? I've found that method yields buns that are more football-shaped than cylindrical. How were yours?

    I shaped them forming a rectangle, pinching the edges together, rolling and setting it on the tray seam side down. I think it was a method I picked up for making bagel bread or Czech bread dumplings.

    When they were laid next to each other on the parchment paper, there was an intentional gap. Between a brief second rise and baking, they fused together. My Dad commented they were taller more than wide.

    Did the unscalded milk caused the buns to stale quickly? I think we learned that in my one college food science class. That was a long time ago, though.

    We have one bun left. I don't think it will survive beyond breakfast. No idea on whether it will stale fast or not.

    I heated the milk to about 109 for proofing the yeast. If it is yogurt or ricotta, then I aim for 190. I have seen instructions for scalding milk, though it has been a long time and don't even recall what type of recipe it was.

    I have made Japanese milk bread, which did not require scalding milk and stayed fresh for quite a while.

    My family's bread consumption goes up and down. If I made a new bread style, or one I have not made for a while, consumption is high. After it is repeated a few times, the interest drops and bread is consumed at a normal rate. Rarely does the homemade bread get moldy, though I have uses for it when it becomes stale.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #37 - March 21st, 2021, 10:26 pm
    Post #37 - March 21st, 2021, 10:26 pm Post #37 - March 21st, 2021, 10:26 pm
    Ha, I experience the bread-novelty effect here, too. I've used the rolled-up-rectangle bun shaping method since I saw it in another video. Much like making tiny baguettes. Works well.

    And I agree with you about 10 vs 8 buns. In my experience, 1/4 c flour makes a plenty-large bun.

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