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The Hungarian Kitchen: Chicken Paprikash

The Hungarian Kitchen: Chicken Paprikash
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  • The Hungarian Kitchen: Chicken Paprikash

    Post #1 - February 4th, 2008, 2:17 am
    Post #1 - February 4th, 2008, 2:17 am Post #1 - February 4th, 2008, 2:17 am
    When winter comes, my thoughts and taste buds often turn toward the belly-warming and soul satisfying dishes of Central Europe. I taught myself to cook while living in Budapest, and chicken paprikash is among the first dishes I learned. Like many dishes with peasant roots, it is a simple dish with minimal ingredients. Its entire success depends on quality ingredients and technique.

    Here are most of the ingredients you'll need:

    (Edited on 2/4/13: It's mentioned way downthread, but I wanted to add up here that this dish can be made lacto-vegetarian by substituting mushrooms for the chicken. The proportions remain pretty much the same, although the cooking time will be much shorter. The more varied the mushrooms, the more interesting the final gombapaprikás [mushroom paprikash]. It is a common, inexpensive dish served in Hungary.

    Also, veal can be substituted for chicken to make borjúpaprikás. The three--chicken, veal, and mushroom--are the most common versions of paprikash. Some culinary taxonomies insist that paprikash is made with white meat or fish--veal being considered a "white meat" in this case--but I would say the defining characteristic of paprikash is the presence of cream, usually soured.)

    Image

    Sour cream (my preference is for the Mexican brands, but Dean's will do. ETA 11/11/14: Over the last few years, I've grown quite partial to Daisy brand sour cream. It seems to be pretty much the only sour cream at my grocery that is made only from cream, and nothing else.), onions, paprika, lard, and chicken pieces, skin on.

    Many Hungarian dishes, including paprikash, begin by sweating the onions in lard (or sunflower oil), then adding paprika after lowering the heat. I use about one large onion and two or so heaped teaspoons of paprika for every two pounds of chicken. The quality of paprika is paramount in a dish like this. See how red it is? That's pretty much how red it is in real life. From my experience, the ubiquitous Pride of Szeged brand sweet paprika will do fine. McCormick's will not. You may mix sweet and hot paprika, but I have a strong preference to using only sweet paprika in this dish. (I am using sweet paprika from a farmer from Kalocsa, Hungary. Kalocsa and Szeged are the two main paprika-producing areas in Hungary).

    (Another quick note about paprika. Penzey's and The Spice House's Sweet Hungarian paprikas are excellent, as well. Plus, I've been quite impressed by the California paprika at Penzey's. It is very important to start with good paprika. It should smell like the essence of sweet red peppers.)

    Image


    It is extremely important to keep the paprika from burning, as it will become bitter and ruin your dish. Some cooks will advise to completely take the pan off the heat. Paprika's flavor compounds are fat soluble, so incorporate the paprika well with your lard or oil:

    Image

    Add chicken:

    Image

    Now, I generally just cook the chicken over medium heat, stirring often, for about ten minutes at this point, to avoid burning the paprika. (And this is also how I was taught). I don't generally brown my chicken for this dish. Some people do. Those who do either brown the chicken first, then add the browned chicken in during this step, or they brown the chicken in the onions and then add the paprika when the chicken is done. Feel free to do it any of these ways.

    After ten minutes, reduce the heat to the lowest setting and season liberally with salt. Cover. Add as little water as possible (if any). This dish should stew in its own juices, and nothing else. Just add water if you're afraid of it burning. Stir it from time to time. After a while (hour, hour and a half), the chicken should have let go of all its juices, and you'll be greeted to this:

    Image

    Now, you can stop here and have something called csirkepörkölt, roughly, chicken goulash. What makes this dish paprikás is the addition of sour cream. Take about a cup or so of sour cream for every two pounds of chicken, beat in two tablespoons of flour, then incorporate it into the beautiful paprika-red chicken juice (I removed the chicken to better incorporate the ingredients, but many don't bother)

    Image

    Cook until the flour is cooked out, check for seasonings, and serve:

    Image

    Unfortunately, I was making this dish for a party, so I had no time to sex up the final photo, and I didn't get a chance to include a key component, which was made at another site: galuska, or spaetzle. Paprikash is normally served with these little egg dumplings. In fact, I could probably subsist the entire winter on just galuska and paprikash gravy. I could always post a recipe and pictures if anyone wishes.

    Variations: some folks add a tomato and/or a pepper midway through the cooking time. I personally do not like tomato in my paprikash, and most of the paprikash I've had in Hungary has been tomatoless. If you add a pepper, sweet banana peppers are the closest I've found to the type of peppers generally used in Hungary. Bell peppers taste all wrong to me in this cuisine. You can also replace half the sour cream with regular cream, or even use creme fraiche, if you desire.
    Last edited by Binko on November 11th, 2014, 10:43 am, edited 4 times in total.
  • Post #2 - February 4th, 2008, 4:49 am
    Post #2 - February 4th, 2008, 4:49 am Post #2 - February 4th, 2008, 4:49 am
    Gorgeous, binko!

    If only I had some decent paprika at home I'd know exactly what to make for dinner tonight...

    Thanks for the inspiration!
  • Post #3 - February 4th, 2008, 7:40 am
    Post #3 - February 4th, 2008, 7:40 am Post #3 - February 4th, 2008, 7:40 am
    "If you add a pepper, sweet banana peppers are the closest I've found to the type of peppers generally used in Hungary."

    And those would be what? The white/yellow globe peppers, or something else?
    What if the Hokey Pokey really IS what it's all about?
  • Post #4 - February 4th, 2008, 7:48 am
    Post #4 - February 4th, 2008, 7:48 am Post #4 - February 4th, 2008, 7:48 am
    Something else

    Image


    Oh, Binko, my man!
    Binko wrote:In fact, I could probably subsist the entire winter on just galuska and paprikash gravy. I could always post a recipe and pictures if anyone wishes.


    So true, so true. Now you're making me nostalgic. What a great time of year for such rib-sticking fare: some stuffed peppers, cabbage.... Great idea, great post!
    Gypsy Boy

    "I am not a glutton--I am an explorer of food." (Erma Bombeck)
  • Post #5 - February 4th, 2008, 7:50 am
    Post #5 - February 4th, 2008, 7:50 am Post #5 - February 4th, 2008, 7:50 am
    GB, those are not Hungarian banana peppers? What are they then?
    What if the Hokey Pokey really IS what it's all about?
  • Post #6 - February 4th, 2008, 7:54 am
    Post #6 - February 4th, 2008, 7:54 am Post #6 - February 4th, 2008, 7:54 am
    Yes, yes. They ARE Hungarian banana peppers. I misunderstood your post to question what Hbp looked like. Upon re-reading, I see where I erred. You wanted to know what kind of peppers they actually used in Hungary. (Right?) :oops: On this precise question, I have to defer to Binko, my experience being more narrowly limited to Romania.
    Gypsy Boy

    "I am not a glutton--I am an explorer of food." (Erma Bombeck)
  • Post #7 - February 4th, 2008, 10:38 am
    Post #7 - February 4th, 2008, 10:38 am Post #7 - February 4th, 2008, 10:38 am
    Cogito wrote:"If you add a pepper, sweet banana peppers are the closest I've found to the type of peppers generally used in Hungary."

    And those would be what? The white/yellow globe peppers, or something else?


    Here's a good picture I found of them on the web:

    Image

    There's two different kinds there. The light yellow one is the sweet Hungarian pepper, and the greener one there is the magyar erős (literally, "Hungarian strong") pepper, which is spicy. The regular Hungarian pepper has no spice that I can detect. The hotter one is the same, so far as I can tell, as what's sold as a Hungarian wax pepper or banana pepper here. The only difference I notice is that the ones in Hungary seem to be a bit greener. [Edited 7/13/14 to add: re-reading this years later, I will slightly disagree with myself. The banana pepper is a decent substitute for the hotter green pepper in the picture, but they're slightly different peppers. An Anaheim will also get you in the ballpark.] For all I know, both the sweet and hot banana peppers may be exactly the same peppers that are sold here. As for the sweet peppers, the main difference I notice is the sweet banana peppers sold here seem to be much narrower with slightly thinner flesh than what I've found in Hungary. The ones sold in Hungary are also used for stuffing, so they have enough of an internal cavity to hold a filling. I've found sweet banana peppers here to be much too narrow for such an application.

    Other peppers commonly used in Hungary include a varietal called bogyiszloi (which is generally spicier than the hot banana pepper), the cherry pepper (usually served pickled), and almapaprika, the apple pepper, a mild-medium spicy pepper with thick skin that is also usually served pickled and is my favorite accompaniment to heavier Hungarian dishes. What we call red, green, and yellow bell peppers here are known as californiai paprika over there, and not really used in indigenous cooking, so far as I've been able to tell.
    Last edited by Binko on July 13th, 2014, 8:23 pm, edited 1 time in total.
  • Post #8 - February 4th, 2008, 11:36 am
    Post #8 - February 4th, 2008, 11:36 am Post #8 - February 4th, 2008, 11:36 am
    I made a batch of paprikash this week too. It's the right dish for that cold weather we had. I usually make nokedli instead of galuska to serve over mine. I didn't have any lard in the house so I used some fat rendered from cooking down some Kolosvari Szalona instead.

    I have to agree that bell pepper is the wrong pepper for this dish. I've seen a lot of recipes that have it listed as an ingredient but it really isn't the right pepper tastewise. I also don't like tomato in my paprikash. I know that some people will add crushed tomatos or a tomato or two to the sauce to cook it but I don't like the consistency and I don't think that it adds a lot of taste to the dish.

    Some people will add a bit of vinegar to taste to their serving but I don't add it into the paprikash directly.
  • Post #9 - February 4th, 2008, 12:12 pm
    Post #9 - February 4th, 2008, 12:12 pm Post #9 - February 4th, 2008, 12:12 pm
    Binko wrote: I could always post a recipe and pictures if anyone wishes.
    ,

    Yes, please!

    I believe Marketplace at Oakton regularly carries the American version of both types of pepper; I recently started using (at the suggestion of a Spanish friend of mine) the sweet variety in gazpacho; it has a pronounced zing that bell peppers lack, a je ne sais quoi somewhere between acidity and spiciness.
  • Post #10 - February 4th, 2008, 12:25 pm
    Post #10 - February 4th, 2008, 12:25 pm Post #10 - February 4th, 2008, 12:25 pm
    Erzsi wrote: I usually make nokedli instead of galuska to serve over mine.


    I thought nokedli and galuska were interchangeable terms in this context, no? At least in the usage I'm familiar with, they are the same thing. What's the difference between the two?
  • Post #11 - February 4th, 2008, 12:33 pm
    Post #11 - February 4th, 2008, 12:33 pm Post #11 - February 4th, 2008, 12:33 pm
    Binko wrote:
    Cogito wrote:"If you add a pepper, sweet banana peppers are the closest I've found to the type of peppers generally used in Hungary."

    And those would be what? The white/yellow globe peppers, or something else?


    almapaprika, the apple pepper, a mild-medium spicy pepper with thick skin that is also usually served pickled and is my favorite accompaniment to heavier Hungarian dishes.

    This is the one I was thinking of. My FIL's brother lived in Gyor and was a botanist that worked for the state equivalent of Dept. of Agriculture. He had a marvelous garden at his home, where he grew an excellent sample of these peppers. When I left Hungary he gave me some seeds from these peppers so that I could grow my own over here. I've yet to find them fresh in any market, have you? Unfortunately, I haven't been able to procure growing space to try them out yet. If I ever do, I'll save a few for you. The ones he grew were pretty spicy.
    What if the Hokey Pokey really IS what it's all about?
  • Post #12 - February 4th, 2008, 12:49 pm
    Post #12 - February 4th, 2008, 12:49 pm Post #12 - February 4th, 2008, 12:49 pm
    Cogito wrote: I've yet to find them fresh in any market, have you?


    No, I haven't seen them here, either fresh or pickled, although I suspect Bende might sell the pickled ones. To be honest, I've never encountered them in anything but the pickled form, sometimes stuffed with sauerkraut. If you liked pickled stuff, Hungary is a great place to visit. The markets generally have at least one vendor selling nothing but pickled vegetables of all varieties, from peppers to melons to walnuts, etc.
  • Post #13 - February 4th, 2008, 12:55 pm
    Post #13 - February 4th, 2008, 12:55 pm Post #13 - February 4th, 2008, 12:55 pm
    HI,

    When traveling by train in Hungary or middle Europe during peak growing season. It is a common sight for a fellow passenger to have the equivalent of a 50 pound potato sack filled with peppers.

    Unlike many European countries, Hungarians really deliver on the heat in their food.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #14 - February 4th, 2008, 1:07 pm
    Post #14 - February 4th, 2008, 1:07 pm Post #14 - February 4th, 2008, 1:07 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:Unlike many European countries, Hungarians really deliver on the heat in their food.


    Compared to their Central European brethren, absolutely. I've found that in the countryside you're more likely to encounter folks who really love their hot banana peppers. However, in Budapest, the spiciest stuff you're likely to encounter are the pickled cherry peppers and the hot paprika paste known as Erős Pista (lit, "Strong Steve." You can find it at Bende.) All the homecooking I've ever had there has been mild--heat is usually added at the plate with pepper paste or dried cherry peppers or dried hot paprika. Most Budapesters I know really can't handle much spiciness at all, and I was very disappointed because Hungary does have this reputation as having spicy food, but I rarely encountered anything even as spicy as a jalapeno there.

    The only dish I could think of that is consistently served on the spicier side is the fish soup.
  • Post #15 - February 4th, 2008, 3:17 pm
    Post #15 - February 4th, 2008, 3:17 pm Post #15 - February 4th, 2008, 3:17 pm
    Binko wrote:I thought nokedli and galuska were interchangeable terms in this context, no? At least in the usage I'm familiar with, they are the same thing. What's the difference between the two?


    Maybe it's a regional thing, the galuska recipe that I use has oil in it, and the nokedli doesn't. Usually when we make galuska we add them into other soups, like sparga leves, or borso leves usually unformed, dipped off the end of a spoon.

    When making nokedli, for things like a paprikas, porkolt, we use a nokedli szagato, a grater that forms the dumplings into a pea sized pieces.

    Aside from the oil, they're both dumplings, and essentially it may just be the verbage, but that's always how I've made it and had it explained to me.

    (Sorry for the lack of accents, I'm not sure how to properly add them here) :)
  • Post #16 - February 4th, 2008, 3:45 pm
    Post #16 - February 4th, 2008, 3:45 pm Post #16 - February 4th, 2008, 3:45 pm
    Erzsi wrote:When making nokedli, for things like a paprikas, porkolt, we use a nokedli szagato, a grater that forms the dumplings into a pea sized pieces.


    Are you talking about a spaetzle type dumpling here?

    Maybe 4 years ago, I went to Czech Republic to a small factory town near the German border. So near you could watch CZech or German language programs with CNN International the only English programing.

    In one of the oldest posts I have never finished writing, I ate daily in the factory canteen. They had intended I would lunch with the Director or some other management during this time, I shocked them by desiring the employee canteen. After a huge discussion they allowed me to eat in the canteen for the cost of $1. for the duration of my visit. Apparently the meal is a benefit to the workers without any cost. What I always referred to as Czech Potato or Bread dumplings (the large round disks), they called nokedli or something very close to it. They often had a different goulash on the menu nearly every day and a variety of nokedli. You could even buy nokedli to take home.

    I recognize in this area there is so much cultural and culinary overlap that defies arbitrary political boundaries. You will have people explain these regions were once united as the Austro-Hungarian Empire, which sometimes is easy to forget.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #17 - February 4th, 2008, 5:04 pm
    Post #17 - February 4th, 2008, 5:04 pm Post #17 - February 4th, 2008, 5:04 pm
    Erzsi wrote:When making nokedli, for things like a paprikas, porkolt, we use a nokedli szagato, a grater that forms the dumplings into a pea sized pieces.


    Funny enough, I know it as a galuska szaggató. :) It sounds to me like you make your nokedli like I make my galuska. Scanning online, it seems the two terms are synonymous in this context, although galuska may be a little more expansive (the term being used in such things as májgaluska [liver dumplings] and daragaluska [little semolina dumpling balls]).
  • Post #18 - February 5th, 2008, 11:07 am
    Post #18 - February 5th, 2008, 11:07 am Post #18 - February 5th, 2008, 11:07 am
    Cathy2 wrote:
    Are you talking about a spaetzle type dumpling here? "



    Yes, I am.

    It's very interesting to talk to people from different areas of Eastern Europe. I met some people from the Ukraine, from what I could understand (we didn't have a mutual language in comment that we were all flluent in) part that used to belong to Hungary, called Carpatho-Ukraine, and it was interesting to hear their variations on the same dishes that I make.

    Another good example of this are Szekely dishes. The Szekely are a group of Hungarians, mostly settled into the Carpathians, that identify themselves as descendants from Atilla's Huns. They speak Hungarian but, also have a distinct local dialect, and their cooking also has a distinct difference but similarity to traditional Hungarian dishes.
  • Post #19 - February 5th, 2008, 11:33 am
    Post #19 - February 5th, 2008, 11:33 am Post #19 - February 5th, 2008, 11:33 am
    Binko wrote:
    Funny enough, I know it as a galuska szaggató. :) It sounds to me like you make your nokedli like I make my galuska. Scanning online, it seems the two terms are synonymous in this context, although galuska may be a little more expansive (the term being used in such things as májgaluska [liver dumplings] and daragaluska [little semolina dumpling balls]).


    I'd tend to agree that the tern galuska is probably more expansive. I'm not a fan of the daragaluska myself. I think part of it is that I've yet to master the texture of them. Mine always end up being quite chewy in the center. This should serve as a reminder for me to mess around with the recipe again over the weekend.
  • Post #20 - February 5th, 2008, 11:40 am
    Post #20 - February 5th, 2008, 11:40 am Post #20 - February 5th, 2008, 11:40 am
    Erzsi wrote:I'd tend to agree that the tern galuska is probably more expansive. I'm not a fan of the daragaluska myself. I think part of it is that I've yet to master the texture of them. Mine always end up being quite chewy in the center. This should serve as a reminder for me to mess around with the recipe again over the weekend.


    I've never bothered with daraglauska myself. One of these days, I should try it. Now, somlói galuska is a different story. I'm not much of a dessert person, but I was addicted to that stuff.
  • Post #21 - February 5th, 2008, 11:51 am
    Post #21 - February 5th, 2008, 11:51 am Post #21 - February 5th, 2008, 11:51 am
    Binko wrote:
    I've never bothered with daraglauska myself. One of these days, I should try it. Now, somlói galuska is a different story. I'm not much of a dessert person, but I was addicted to that stuff.


    Somloi galuska is so good. I did have a bad preperation once, where it came out and had what I still maintain to this day, was Hershey's syrup poured all over it.

    I'm also happy to tear into palacsinta (crepes) with Nutella inside.
  • Post #22 - January 6th, 2013, 4:32 pm
    Post #22 - January 6th, 2013, 4:32 pm Post #22 - January 6th, 2013, 4:32 pm
    Given Binko's pepper pix upthread, I'd be willing to make a reasonable wager that those peppers are (closely) related to Italian frying peppers, which are certainly closer than any version of bannana peppers. I've grown both mild and half-hot Szeged peppers, and I'd say that one could grow Gypsy cubanelles as a valuable replacement for the mild.

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #23 - January 6th, 2013, 4:56 pm
    Post #23 - January 6th, 2013, 4:56 pm Post #23 - January 6th, 2013, 4:56 pm
    Addendum: Here's a nice discussion of Gypsy peppers that refers to Hungarian cooks.

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #24 - January 7th, 2013, 11:43 am
    Post #24 - January 7th, 2013, 11:43 am Post #24 - January 7th, 2013, 11:43 am
    Nice post. I think that maybe the reason so many Americans put a lot of tomato sauce in the dish might be because they have bad paprika. With the proper paprika the dish is a bright red without tomato. If I were to make I might put a few tablespoons in. I would also cut down on the sour cream as it does not agree with my gullet and green peppers, or some kind of peppers are a necessity in my opinion. I am looking forward to making this soon. I have some half hot half sweet paprika from Penszys but I need to go to Bende to get the sweet. Now where is the gulyas post?
    Toria

    "I like this place and willingly could waste my time in it" - As You Like It,
    W. Shakespeare
  • Post #25 - January 7th, 2013, 3:18 pm
    Post #25 - January 7th, 2013, 3:18 pm Post #25 - January 7th, 2013, 3:18 pm
    gulyás ... if you used the accent or simply the word goulash, you would have found it! :D
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #26 - January 7th, 2013, 8:42 pm
    Post #26 - January 7th, 2013, 8:42 pm Post #26 - January 7th, 2013, 8:42 pm
    Cathy strikes again! Just when you need her.
    Toria

    "I like this place and willingly could waste my time in it" - As You Like It,
    W. Shakespeare
  • Post #27 - January 13th, 2013, 1:56 pm
    Post #27 - January 13th, 2013, 1:56 pm Post #27 - January 13th, 2013, 1:56 pm
    Geo wrote:Given Binko's pepper pix upthread, I'd be willing to make a reasonable wager that those peppers are (closely) related to Italian frying peppers, which are certainly closer than any version of bannana peppers. I've grown both mild and half-hot Szeged peppers, and I'd say that one could grow Gypsy cubanelles as a valuable replacement for the mild.

    Geo


    Yeah, I actually do mention that in this post I did on Hungarian lecsó. Those are pretty close. The main thing is that Hungarian sweet peppers are a pale yellow-green in color, so they don't have quite the strong chlorophyll taste of most green peppers. They're much milder that way. But with the amount of peppers you are using in this recipe, it should not matter that much. Italian frying, cubanelle, sweet banana peppers--all will work fine. Personally, I find the sweet banana peppers to be the closest in terms of flavor, but they tend to have a thinner flesh to them.
  • Post #28 - January 13th, 2013, 2:05 pm
    Post #28 - January 13th, 2013, 2:05 pm Post #28 - January 13th, 2013, 2:05 pm
    toria wrote:Nice post. I think that maybe the reason so many Americans put a lot of tomato sauce in the dish might be because they have bad paprika. With the proper paprika the dish is a bright red without tomato. If I were to make I might put a few tablespoons in. I would also cut down on the sour cream as it does not agree with my gullet and green peppers, or some kind of peppers are a necessity in my opinion. I am looking forward to making this soon. I have some half hot half sweet paprika from Penszys but I need to go to Bende to get the sweet. Now where is the gulyas post?


    I don't quite agree about the peppers being a necessity (and they are quite often omitted or used very sparingly in Hungarian recipes--like one pepper to a whole chicken--but this is a dish with many variations, so make it as you wish), but if sour cream doesn't agree with you, you can make a lovely dish without it, which would be a chicken pörkölt. If you go on and add a good bit more water (say, about a liter or so), and soup vegetables (which in Hungary would be carrot, parsnip, potatoes, and possibly celery root), you've made yourself a chicken goulash(soup).
  • Post #29 - January 14th, 2013, 1:12 pm
    Post #29 - January 14th, 2013, 1:12 pm Post #29 - January 14th, 2013, 1:12 pm
    Although it is definitely NOT a chicken paprikash (which I love & must make soon), in honor of this cold snap I just finished putting in the crockpot something similar, turkey thighs with beer and onions, my debut attempt.

    Basically, it's skinned turkey thighs rubbed with Dijon mustard, sea salt & cracked black pepper. Then separately, saute thinly sliced white onion in olive oil, add a little tomato paste, let it brown somewhat, then add thyme, a 1/4 cup of flour, then finish it off with a bottle o'beer, in this case a Bridgeport IPA. Let it simmer, then pour it in the crock.

    I'll find out in 6 hours how it turned out. I shoulda picked up some spaetzle to go with it! :P
  • Post #30 - January 14th, 2013, 7:41 pm
    Post #30 - January 14th, 2013, 7:41 pm Post #30 - January 14th, 2013, 7:41 pm
    That sounds suspiciously like a Flemish carbonnade, except with turkey replacing the beef. Let us know how it turns out--I usually don't like to cook with IPAs, as they're hoppy and a bit bitter, but not everyone seems to notice. When I do carbonnade, my cheaper domestic choice is New Belgium's Abbey or Triple (and sometimes one bottle of each.)

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