LTH Home

German Potato Salad

German Potato Salad
  • Forum HomePost Reply BackTop
  • German Potato Salad

    Post #1 - July 16th, 2008, 9:26 am
    Post #1 - July 16th, 2008, 9:26 am Post #1 - July 16th, 2008, 9:26 am
    I have been searching for a store/deli/etc. to buy good prepared german potato salad. The old standbys in Lincoln Square have closed. I know that Gepperth's on Halsted sells german potato salad, but I'm wondering if anyone has any other suggestions based on previous experiences. Any help would be appreciated.

    Jeff
  • Post #2 - July 20th, 2008, 1:52 pm
    Post #2 - July 20th, 2008, 1:52 pm Post #2 - July 20th, 2008, 1:52 pm
    Paulina Market makes a fine version of German Potato Salad. In fact, all of their house made salads are really good, but, this being Paulina, they're not cheap.
  • Post #3 - July 21st, 2008, 11:00 pm
    Post #3 - July 21st, 2008, 11:00 pm Post #3 - July 21st, 2008, 11:00 pm
    Jeff, do you cook at all? I know you asked for a place to buy it...but since it's not easy to find, I've turned to making my own. It's not hard, but harder than buying it, lol.
  • Post #4 - July 22nd, 2008, 9:20 am
    Post #4 - July 22nd, 2008, 9:20 am Post #4 - July 22nd, 2008, 9:20 am
    Thanks for the suggestions.

    I do cook quite a bit, and if you happen to have a good recipe, I would love to try it sometime.
  • Post #5 - July 24th, 2008, 9:25 pm
    Post #5 - July 24th, 2008, 9:25 pm Post #5 - July 24th, 2008, 9:25 pm
    German potato salad was one of the first things I learned to cook, back in college. It's really easy and if you want to speed up the time, you can even use drained, canned potatoes.

    All you need are:

    Potatoes
    Onion
    Bacon
    Sugar
    Cider vinegar
    Salt and pepper

    Anyway, boil the potatoes, as many you like. I usually use redskin potatoes and don't bother to peel them. If you use Idaho potatoes, peel them first.

    When the potatoes are cool enough to handle, slice thickly or cut in bite-sized chunks. Slice or dice 1 onion for every five or six potatoes, or more if you like it, and add it to the spuds. It's not authentic, but you can add some diced bell pepper, too.

    Make hot bacon dressing: Dice 4 to 6 slices of bacon. Fry till just crisp and remove from the pan with a slotted spoon. Measure the bacon grease and add equal amounts of granulated sugar and cider vinegar and stir over heat until the sugar's all dissolved. (Be careful when adding the vinegar to the hot fat! It will spatter. Also, keep your eyes well out of the way of the steam.)

    Pour over the potatoes and onions and add salt and pepper to taste plus the bacon bits. Toss well and serve warm or at room temperature.

    You can also use the hot bacon dressing for spinach salad.
  • Post #6 - July 25th, 2008, 12:39 pm
    Post #6 - July 25th, 2008, 12:39 pm Post #6 - July 25th, 2008, 12:39 pm
    LAZ,

    When I make my (famous) classic potato salad, I burn my fingers insuring that the potato slices are still steamingly hot when I add them to the mayo dressing. That makes a huge difference in the amount of sauce absorbed by the potatoes.

    Do you think that this hot potato-hot potato routine might be useful in making your German potato salad? I've never made a German version, so I know little about the process.

    Just thinking out loud here...

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #7 - July 25th, 2008, 3:27 pm
    Post #7 - July 25th, 2008, 3:27 pm Post #7 - July 25th, 2008, 3:27 pm
    Geo wrote:When I make my (famous) classic potato salad, I burn my fingers insuring that the potato slices are still steamingly hot when I add them to the mayo dressing. That makes a huge difference in the amount of sauce absorbed by the potatoes.

    Do you think that this hot potato-hot potato routine might be useful in making your German potato salad?

    Since the dressing is hot when you pour it on, you shouldn't have to burn your fingers on the spuds. I usually drain the potatoes and let them cool while I cut up the onion and start frying the bacon. (BTW, if you aren't fussy about aesthetics, it's a bit faster to cook the bacon in slices and crumble it once it's cooked.)

    I have done this even with room-temperature canned potatoes and the results are decent. It wouldn't be a good idea to use potatoes cold enough to congeal the bacon fat.

    For similar reasons, if you refrigerate the leftovers, you want to warm them up a bit before serving. I typically put it in the microwave for a minute or so. (If you're making a small quantity, you can do the whole thing in the microwave. Nuke the potatoes, covered, so they steam a bit. Then cook the bacon in a Pyrex measuring cup.)
  • Post #8 - July 31st, 2008, 12:15 pm
    Post #8 - July 31st, 2008, 12:15 pm Post #8 - July 31st, 2008, 12:15 pm
    This post prompted a flashback to the german potato salad of my youth:

    http://www.shopfoodex.com/read-german-p ... -1481.html

    It seems easy to prepare the real non canned version, and I know my mom hated to cook, but I think the real reason this item appeared on out table was my dad's fondness for it. I can almost taste the slimy potatoes and soggy bacon. Yum-o.
  • Post #9 - July 31st, 2008, 12:35 pm
    Post #9 - July 31st, 2008, 12:35 pm Post #9 - July 31st, 2008, 12:35 pm
    Oh man, emdub! Does that take me back, or what? Remember this ??!

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #10 - July 31st, 2008, 7:06 pm
    Post #10 - July 31st, 2008, 7:06 pm Post #10 - July 31st, 2008, 7:06 pm
    Here's my grandmother's recipe for German Potato Salad. She was a Schaller of Swedish descent married into a food loving German family named Rudolph

    German Potato Salad

    10 pounds new potatoes
    1 pound bacon
    3 cups scallions or spring onions
    2 cups cider vinegar
    1 tablespoon sugar
    1 tablespoon water
    ½ cup canola oil
    1 cup parsley

    Finely chop bacon. Cook until crisp.

    Cover the potatoes with water and bring to a boil. Boil until tender approximately 10 minutes. Drain potatoes and let cool. Peel and slice.

    Slice scallions and thinly as possible and add to sliced potatoes

    Heat vinegar, sugar and water in a small pot until boiling and pour over the potatoes.

    Toss the mixture from bowl to bowl about 4 times.

    Add oil and toss to mix. Add bacon and toss to mix. Add parsley just prior to serving.
    MAG
    www.monogrammeevents.com

    "I've never met a pork product I didn't like."
  • Post #11 - July 31st, 2008, 7:40 pm
    Post #11 - July 31st, 2008, 7:40 pm Post #11 - July 31st, 2008, 7:40 pm
    MAG wrote:2 cups cider vinegar
    1 tablespoon sugar

    Is that the correct amount of sugar? It seems like it would be unusually tart for German potato salad.

    I take it you discard the bacon fat in favor of canola oil?
  • Post #12 - August 1st, 2008, 6:20 pm
    Post #12 - August 1st, 2008, 6:20 pm Post #12 - August 1st, 2008, 6:20 pm
    That's always been the way we prepared it. I never like anything particularly sweet, that's probably been an inherited trait. It's not tart at all, just vinegary.

    I put my bacon fat into the container in the fridge and use the canola - lighter flavor.
    MAG
    www.monogrammeevents.com

    "I've never met a pork product I didn't like."
  • Post #13 - August 1st, 2008, 9:27 pm
    Post #13 - August 1st, 2008, 9:27 pm Post #13 - August 1st, 2008, 9:27 pm
    My Gram's potato salad isn't like other German Potato salads I've encountered. Yet it comes straight from her childhood in Schlesian (which is Poland now, but was Germany then) and early married life in Bremen...

    Grandma Kalweit's Potato Salad

    Ingredients:
    red potatoes
    bacon
    onion
    dill pickle
    yellow apple
    Krazy salt
    red wine vinegar
    mayonnaise


    Directions:I don’t have exact measurements for this one. Grandma just makes it to taste, and so do I. The apples are optional. Some of the family leave them out; I love them and always include 'em.

    Boil potatoes whole, with skin on. While they are boiling, chop bacon and fry in pan. Chop onion, dill pickle, and apple. When potatoes are done, peel and cube. Combine potatoes, bacon (and fat), onion, dill pickle, and apple. Add Krazy salt, red wine vinegar, and mayonnaise to taste.
    peace,
    Katharine

    "Granddad was superstitious about books. He thought that if you had enough of them around, education leaked out, like radioactivity." (Terry Pratchett, Johnny and the Dead)
  • Post #14 - August 2nd, 2008, 1:22 am
    Post #14 - August 2nd, 2008, 1:22 am Post #14 - August 2nd, 2008, 1:22 am
    MAG wrote:That's always been the way we prepared it. I never like anything particularly sweet, that's probably been an inherited trait. It's not tart at all, just vinegary.

    OK. I just wondered if was a typo.

    The recipe I posted above, which uses equal parts sugar, vinegar and bacon fat, I learned from a long-ago boyfriend and his mom, who were my principal mentors when I was first seriously learning to cook. She was a Jung, related to the famous psychologist, so for all I know the recipe is Swiss. Then again, he was a sometime short-order cook, and may well have picked it up in the course of some job or other.

    bluroses wrote:I don’t have exact measurements for this one. Grandma just makes it to taste, and so do I.

    Sounds like a really interesting recipe, bluroses! Can you give approximate proportions, i.e. about how many apples and onions to potatoes, and how much vinegar to mayo?
  • Post #15 - August 2nd, 2008, 6:24 am
    Post #15 - August 2nd, 2008, 6:24 am Post #15 - August 2nd, 2008, 6:24 am
    I can try to write down exactly what I use next time I make it, but I can't really tell you otherwise. I just chop until it looks right! I plop some mayo in the bowl, shake in a little vinegar, stir it up, taste it, and decide if it's right ot not. The amount of apple is probably just a smidge less than of onion (or course, I love onion)...

    I'm going to a family party today. I'll see if any of my aunts have written it down in a more followable fashion. (I lived with my gram for years and tend to make here recipes by feel from watching her do it so often. Thank God we have measurements for her baking recipes!)
    peace,
    Katharine

    "Granddad was superstitious about books. He thought that if you had enough of them around, education leaked out, like radioactivity." (Terry Pratchett, Johnny and the Dead)
  • Post #16 - August 3rd, 2008, 10:01 pm
    Post #16 - August 3rd, 2008, 10:01 pm Post #16 - August 3rd, 2008, 10:01 pm
    Since I originally posted this, I have made german potato salad twice. I based my recipe on combining what I considered the best parts of different recipes (or what tasted best to me) and I think I have something that matches what I'm looking for.

    Approx. 3 lbs. white potatoes (about 12 small to medium-sized potatoes)
    1/2 lb. good bacon (Paulina Market thick-cut was an excellent splurge)
    1 medium onion, diced
    1/2 cup of cider vinegar
    1/4 cup water
    3 Tblsp. sugar
    1/4 cup of good stone ground mustard

    1) Boil potatoes for about 20 minutes (I go a little longer, as I find the potatoes absorb the dressing better)
    2) Fry bacon until crispy. Remove bacon from pan, but reserve fat.
    3) Cook diced onion in the bacon fat until it is tender.
    4) Pour off all but about 3 Tblsp. of the bacon fat.
    5) Add vinegar, water, sugar and mustard to pan and simmer for a couple of minutes.
    6) Slice warm potatoes into half-moon slices
    7) Combine potatoes, crumbled bacon and dressing in a large bowl and mix gently.

    I've done this recipe twice and it has all of the flavor I associate with German Potato Salad when I have that craving.

    Thanks for all of the suggestions.

    Jeff
  • Post #17 - March 30th, 2015, 11:05 am
    Post #17 - March 30th, 2015, 11:05 am Post #17 - March 30th, 2015, 11:05 am
    Any updates where to buy?

    Wally Wade
  • Post #18 - March 30th, 2015, 1:58 pm
    Post #18 - March 30th, 2015, 1:58 pm Post #18 - March 30th, 2015, 1:58 pm
    Gene's. Paulina Market, sometimes.
  • Post #19 - November 7th, 2021, 4:58 pm
    Post #19 - November 7th, 2021, 4:58 pm Post #19 - November 7th, 2021, 4:58 pm
    Hi,

    I made German potato salad from Trader Joe's bacon jam. When you taste the vinegar in the jam, it tastes very much like German potato salad. I add some finely cut red onion along with bacon jam mixed into freshly cut up hot from the stove red waxy potatoes.

    Trader Joe's bacon jam is discontinued and I am down to my last few jars. After that, I will have to work harder to make German potato salad. :D

    With my luck, the family will always like the one made with Trader Joe's and whatever happens next will not satisfy them. I will enjoy while it lasts.

    Regards,
    CAthy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #20 - November 8th, 2021, 6:50 pm
    Post #20 - November 8th, 2021, 6:50 pm Post #20 - November 8th, 2021, 6:50 pm
    I just had the best German Potato Salad I have tasted. Unfortunately I bought it at Miesfeld's in Sheboygan. Also picked up some Grand Champion Brats, Cottage Bacon, Liver Sausage, Hash brown Potato Casserole, Bologna Spread, Cook Cheese with Caraway, Smoked Snack Sticks, Maple Breakfast Sausage and Bacon,Smoked Irish Potato sausage and of course a case of Spotted Cow. Love this place.
    "I drink to make other people more interesting."
    Ernest Hemingway
  • Post #21 - November 8th, 2021, 8:12 pm
    Post #21 - November 8th, 2021, 8:12 pm Post #21 - November 8th, 2021, 8:12 pm
    Looks like this thread has evolved from "where can I buy great German Potato Salad" to "here's a great recipe for German Potato Salad". So here's my offering from the July/August 1997 Cuisine magazine. It's takes a little more time, and is a little more labor intensive because you broil the potato slices, rather than boiling them, but the browning adds so much flavor and texture, it's totally worth it.

    Makes 8 cups

    Ingredients:
    24 red potatoes, skin on, sliced ½” thick
    3T olive oil
    1T kosher salt
    2t black pepper
    2T apple cider vinegar

    Hot dressing:
    1/2lb bacon, diced (save the bacon fat!)
    1T flour
    1/2C apple cider vinegar
    1/4C beef broth
    2T light brown sugar

    Topping:
    1/3C green onions, chopped
    Salt & pepper to taste

    Directions:
    Preheat broiler on high. Place oven rack 4” from heat source. Cut the potatoes into ½” slices.
    Toss the potato slices with olive oil, salt, and pepper. Place potatoes in a single layer on a baking sheet.

    Broil the potatoes for 10 minutes, then flip with tongs. Broil for 5 more minutes until crisp and tender.

    Transfer potatoes to a large mixing bowl. Stir in 2T apple cider vinegar so it penetrates the slices. Set aside and keep warm.

    For the dressing, cook the bacon (when it foams, it’s perfect). Drain and set aside bacon, reserving 1/4C of the fat. Return the reserved fat to the pan.

    Saute the onions in the fat until caramelized. Stir in the flour to thicken slightly (2 mins). Whisk in the remaining vinegar, broth, and brown sugar.

    When thick like honey, return the bacon to the skillet. Simmer and stir ½ minutes. Pour dressing over the potatoes.

    Add green onions and season to taste with salt & pepper. Toss gently. Serve warm or at room temperature.


    You're welcome,
    Buddy

Contact

About

Team

Advertize

Close

Chat

Articles

Guide

Events

more