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What are you making for dinner tonite?

What are you making for dinner tonite?
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  • Post #1951 - June 14th, 2022, 9:05 pm
    Post #1951 - June 14th, 2022, 9:05 pm Post #1951 - June 14th, 2022, 9:05 pm
    Lougord99 - have you tried palm vinegar? It's mild, with a giant coconut flavor.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #1952 - June 15th, 2022, 4:19 am
    Post #1952 - June 15th, 2022, 4:19 am Post #1952 - June 15th, 2022, 4:19 am
    I have never heard of Palm vinegar. I will look for it.
  • Post #1953 - June 15th, 2022, 6:42 pm
    Post #1953 - June 15th, 2022, 6:42 pm Post #1953 - June 15th, 2022, 6:42 pm
    Close to 100F again but not quite as hot as yesterday. No reason not to be back at the grill. But before that, a little indoor cooking at the wok, too . . .

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    Wine Caps & Fook Kee Small Slicer, 200mm
    Wine caps, evoo and smashed garlic. There ended up being a bit more to it than this (soy sauce, white wine) but after a long absence, my forager popped up this week offering wine caps and shiitakes, so I decided to take her up on it. Needless to say, the Fook Kee handled the wine caps without issue but I thought it was a more interesting picture with the mushrooms still (mostly) whole. I sliced them lengthwise, the smaller ones in two and the larger ones quartered.

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    Stir-Fried Wine Caps
    Earthy, mellow and rich. I really enjoyed these and it took about 4 minutes to cook them, which was nice.

    Back at the grill, it was another hot-weather favorite . . .

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    SausageFest!
    Beef & Lamb cevaps, cured/smoked grilling sausages. 4-5 minutes on each side covered and indirect. I rolled the grillers directly over the coals for a moment before I took them off.

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    Plated Up
    Managed to sneak some more asparagus onto the grill after the sausages came off (still not sick of it! :lol:). Snarfed these down with a trio of condiments, which included 2 store-bought mustards and the near-end of my homemade cherry bomb sambal. Hopefully, new crop isn't too far off. I need to make more.

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #1954 - June 15th, 2022, 7:08 pm
    Post #1954 - June 15th, 2022, 7:08 pm Post #1954 - June 15th, 2022, 7:08 pm
    Image
    Didn't want to cook in the heat. Tuna salad with buttered english muffins. Tuna salad had tuna, mayo, red onion soaked in red wine vinegar for 15 minutes and drained, celery and parsley.
  • Post #1955 - June 16th, 2022, 7:24 am
    Post #1955 - June 16th, 2022, 7:24 am Post #1955 - June 16th, 2022, 7:24 am
    lougord99 wrote:Didn't want to cook in the heat. Tuna salad with buttered english muffins. Tuna salad had tuna, mayo, red onion soaked in red wine vinegar for 15 minutes and drained, celery and parsley.

    Ooh, I'll have to try that with red onions! Sounds like it would take off their bite while adding some flavor.
    -Mary
  • Post #1956 - June 17th, 2022, 7:09 pm
    Post #1956 - June 17th, 2022, 7:09 pm Post #1956 - June 17th, 2022, 7:09 pm
    Going to attempt to make pupusas tomorrow. If successful, I will post some pictures. If not, forget I posted this…
  • Post #1957 - June 18th, 2022, 5:10 pm
    Post #1957 - June 18th, 2022, 5:10 pm Post #1957 - June 18th, 2022, 5:10 pm
    LynnB wrote:Going to attempt to make pupusas tomorrow. If successful, I will post some pictures. If not, forget I posted this…

    Really hope this worked out for you . . .

    This was somewhat of a mid-day experiment with a few stray pieces of bone-in pork belly that I wanted to use up . . .

    Image
    Mise En Place & Makoto VG10 Damascus Gyuto, 210mm
    Corn starch (later slurried), dark soy sauce, 10-year-aged black vinegar, light soy sauce, chopped garlic, slivered ginger, toasted Sichuan peppercorns, gelatinous chicken stock, pork belly nuggets (blanched in an aromatic bath, then fried in veg oil), scallion tops, scallion bottoms, granulated sugar, Chinese-inspired spice mix and toasted sesame oil.

    Blanched the chunks of belly in a pot of water that also included smashed garlic & ginger, 3 scallions knotted together and a splash of Shaoxing cooking wine. Once they were done and had cooled, I seasoned them with the spice mix and a light sprinkle of sugar (to promote caramelization), and fried them briefly in veg oil. Sauce-wise, I was kind of riffing on a kung pao variation that I made a few weeks ago, and that turned out pretty well.

    I started assembly by briefly sizzling the garlic and ginger in some veg oil in the wok. Then, in went the scallion bottoms. Once all that was fragrant, I built the sauce by adding stock, vinegar, soy sauces, sesame oil and the corn starch slurry. When that reached the desired thickness, I tossed in the scallion tops and the pork. Once they were warmed and thoroughly coated, the dish was done . . .

    Image
    On The Platter
    Ginger-Scallion Pork Belly, garnished with chive and onion blossoms. This turned out pretty darned good, especially for winging it. There are a few adjustments I'd make next time (maybe brine the belly if I have time, a bit less ginger) but by taking techniques and specific parts from a few dishes I've made in the past, I was able to cobble together something that was pretty decent.

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #1958 - June 18th, 2022, 7:22 pm
    Post #1958 - June 18th, 2022, 7:22 pm Post #1958 - June 18th, 2022, 7:22 pm
    All of your stocks are 'gelatinous'.

    Does that mean that you made the stock with as much sinuous parts that you could find and then you cook the resulting stock down significantly ?
  • Post #1959 - June 18th, 2022, 8:37 pm
    Post #1959 - June 18th, 2022, 8:37 pm Post #1959 - June 18th, 2022, 8:37 pm
    lougord99 wrote:All of your stocks are 'gelatinous'.

    Does that mean that you made the stock with as much sinuous parts that you could find and then you cook the resulting stock down significantly ?


    Can’t speak for Ronnie but I make a solidly gelatinous chicken stock in my InstaPot. Pressure cook any bone-in -skin-on chicken parts with water to cover for 20 mins them leave on warm for a few hours or overnight and I get a stock that is solidly jellied when cooled in the fridge.
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #1960 - June 18th, 2022, 9:00 pm
    Post #1960 - June 18th, 2022, 9:00 pm Post #1960 - June 18th, 2022, 9:00 pm
    Making pupusas was the most fun I’ve had in the kitchen in a little while. Involving my daughter had a lot to do with that. If your child/grandchild is bored this Summer I highly recommend a pupusa making session. The dough is very forgiving as long as it is not overworked. The recipe I used can be found in the book “Absolutely Avocados” by Gaby Dalkin.

    Audrey had not had a pupusa before but immediately made the connection to the arepas she’s had at Rica Arepa.

    Making the dough, filling, and shaping them was easy. The tricky part for me was regulating the heat in the pan to sear them properly without burning. Took some adjustments.

    I made the avocado-tomatillo salsa from the same book and served them with refried black beans and some tortilla chips.

    I’ve never made tortillas at home but this inspired me to maybe give that a try. The smell in the kitchen reminded me of walking into Ixcapuzalco for the first time.

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  • Post #1961 - June 19th, 2022, 8:02 am
    Post #1961 - June 19th, 2022, 8:02 am Post #1961 - June 19th, 2022, 8:02 am
    Those pupusas look terrific! I was hoping they would be met with your approval.

    Thanks!
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #1962 - June 19th, 2022, 4:00 pm
    Post #1962 - June 19th, 2022, 4:00 pm Post #1962 - June 19th, 2022, 4:00 pm
    boudreaulicious wrote:Can’t speak for Ronnie but I make a solidly gelatinous chicken stock in my InstaPot. Pressure cook any bone-in -skin-on chicken parts with water to cover for 20 mins them leave on warm for a few hours or overnight and I get a stock that is solidly jellied when cooled in the fridge.


    Ever since you first posted about making stock in the instapot, I have been using it for chicken stock using whole bone-in thighs. But I have pressure cooked for 45 minutes and only let it sit until pressure naturally released. Thank you for a clarification on how you do it and I will definitely let it sit in the pot on warm for a much longer time than I do now.
  • Post #1963 - June 19th, 2022, 7:09 pm
    Post #1963 - June 19th, 2022, 7:09 pm Post #1963 - June 19th, 2022, 7:09 pm
    lougord99 wrote:
    boudreaulicious wrote:Can’t speak for Ronnie but I make a solidly gelatinous chicken stock in my InstaPot. Pressure cook any bone-in -skin-on chicken parts with water to cover for 20 mins them leave on warm for a few hours or overnight and I get a stock that is solidly jellied when cooled in the fridge.


    Ever since you first posted about making stock in the instapot, I have been using it for chicken stock using whole bone-in thighs. But I have pressure cooked for 45 minutes and only let it sit until pressure naturally released. Thank you for a clarification on how you do it and I will definitely let it sit in the pot on warm for a much longer time than I do now.

    I tip my cap to Jen for turning me onto what has become my #1 instant pot use, by far. It's fantastic. I usually make about a gallon in the instant pot (natural release), then reduce it on the stove top until I only have about a quart left (strained, defatted, etc.). The result, once it's chilled, is a highly gelatinous, solid mass. However, if I'm making a soup (or similar) right away, I don't bother reducing it. I just use it directly. But I like concentrating it when I'm storing it for any length of time because it keeps longer, takes up less room and works well in dishes when you want to impart a lot of flavor without diluting the final dish (stir-fries, etc.). Fwiw, I never start with whole meat or pieces that I could otherwise cook and serve. I use scraps: wings, necks, spines, etc., which I roast in the oven before I instant pot them.

    Tonight's dinner prep started with some side-dishery . . .

    Image
    Zucchini Mise En Place & Makoto VG10 Damascus Gyuto, 210mm
    Black pepper, salt, evoo, zucchini, sliced garlic and yellow onion. Ended up just doing a quick saute here.

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    Sauteed Zucchini
    More chive and onion flowers as the garnish.

    Main course was a family favorite, hatcho miso & sake-marinated short ribs (marinated for about 24 hours) . . .

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    Grilling
    Went with the Napoleon on this one because the adjustable grate height -- combined with having 4 batches of ribs to grill -- gave it a slight edge over the Weber. 2-3 minutes per side directly over the coals and they were done.

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    Charcoal-Grilled Short Ribs
    Way too delicious for how easy they are.

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    Plated Up
    With spicy/sweet cucumber salad and a freshly cooked batch of jasmine rice.

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #1964 - June 20th, 2022, 10:58 am
    Post #1964 - June 20th, 2022, 10:58 am Post #1964 - June 20th, 2022, 10:58 am
    Sorry if I asked this before and forgot; where do you get those flanken-cut short ribs, Ronnie? From a butcher or an Asian market or somewhere else? I have been keeping an eye out for some for a while.
    "Your swimming suit matches your eyes, you hold your nose before diving, loving you has made me bananas!"
  • Post #1965 - June 20th, 2022, 11:06 am
    Post #1965 - June 20th, 2022, 11:06 am Post #1965 - June 20th, 2022, 11:06 am
    Katie wrote:Sorry if I asked this before and forgot; where do you get those flanken-cut short ribs, Ronnie? From a butcher or an Asian market or somewhere else? I have been keeping an eye out for some for a while.

    You did but that's totally okay. These were from Fresh Farms in Wheeling. But you can get them at many places. I've also gotten them at Zier's, Whole Foods, Sunset and H-Mart (and probably some other places) in the past.

    I documented this in another post but I'll mention again that no matter where you buy them, they'll almost certainly need a few thorough rinses (and drying off) before marinating. It's just the nature of the cut that there will be bone chips, and you'll want to get rid of those as best you can before proceeding.

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #1966 - June 20th, 2022, 6:40 pm
    Post #1966 - June 20th, 2022, 6:40 pm Post #1966 - June 20th, 2022, 6:40 pm
    2 nights in a row on the Napoleon (sarcastic applause). I've come to understand that this grill does one thing well: it's ideal for very hot cooks over direct fire. So tonight, some thin-cut pork chops that covered a lot of grill space and -- due to how many I cooked -- required a few shifts directly over the coals.

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    Grilling
    Oiled and lightly seasoned with Manale spice mix. Just kept these guys moving and flipped them frequently.

    There was also some asparagus. This time, steamed and shocked in cold water . . .

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    Cold Asparagus
    Flake salt, melted butter and lemon cheeks. Garnished with onion blossoms and chive blossoms. I really prefer these thicc boys, which were from the grocery store. Much nicer than what we've been receiving in our CSA box. Not only am I still not sick of asparagus yet, these were the best of the season so far. :P

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    Charcoal-Grilled Pork Chops
    Garnished with some spicy radish micro greens, which were really tasty.

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    Plated Up
    More chive blossoms, more onion blossoms, more spicy radish micro greens . . . and a blob of the weekly slaw.

    Happy Monday! :)

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #1967 - June 21st, 2022, 6:36 pm
    Post #1967 - June 21st, 2022, 6:36 pm Post #1967 - June 21st, 2022, 6:36 pm
    103F today (though, only 98 by the time I started cooking), so kept it fairly easy, with charcoal-grilled chicken thighs and a quick-cook riff on Chinese restaurant-style broccoli in garlic sauce (inspired by an Adam Ragusea video from a while back) . . .

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    Mise En Place & Teruyasu Fujiwara Wa Denka Gyuto, 210mm
    Oyster sauce, granulated sugar, corn starch (later slurried), red hot finger chiles, minced ginger, veg oil, 5-year-aged black vinegar, minced garlic, toasted sesame oil, shoyu, toasted sesame seeds, steamed/shocked broccoli florets, msg, granulated onion, black pepper and gelatinous chicken stock.

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    Broccoli With Garlic Sauce
    Turned out really good and checked all the boxes . . . toothsome florets, thick and gloppy sauce that was sweet, sour and spicy. Next time, a bit less ginger and I'll also ease up on the vinegar but overall, this was a winner.

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    Plated Up
    With some two-day-old/reheated jasmine rice.

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #1968 - June 21st, 2022, 7:38 pm
    Post #1968 - June 21st, 2022, 7:38 pm Post #1968 - June 21st, 2022, 7:38 pm
    Thank you, Ronnie. I've made a note to visit those places and not ask you a third time. :lol:
    "Your swimming suit matches your eyes, you hold your nose before diving, loving you has made me bananas!"
  • Post #1969 - June 22nd, 2022, 6:42 pm
    Post #1969 - June 22nd, 2022, 6:42 pm Post #1969 - June 22nd, 2022, 6:42 pm
    Katie wrote:Thank you, Ronnie. I've made a note to visit those places and not ask you a third time. :lol:

    LOL - I'm excited for you to try them. They're so simple and so good.

    For us tonight, it was Thai-style beef salad again. Started the final prep by toasting some jasmine rice and a kaffir lime leaf . . .

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    Toasted Rice, Lime Leaf & Newquist Wok
    Maybe a bit of overkill using the wok but its shape/size helped prevent any rice from ending up on the floor while I was swishing it around. From here, took the easy way out this time and used the spice grinder, instead of the mortar & pestle to grind it all up. I'm a bit of a n00b but I didn't notice any difference in the finished dish . . . and it saved me about 15 minutes of pretty laborious grinding.

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    Mise En Place & Teruyasu Fujiwara Wa Denka Gyuto, 210mm
    Everything but the beef . . . fish sauce, ground/toasted rice powder & lime leaf, cilantro leaves, mint sprig, shallots, lemon grass, torn mint leaves, Thai chile powder, limes and granulated sugar. I had to include the sprig of mint in the picture because it was the most beautiful mint I've ever handled . . . fuzzy/tender, bright green and intensely aromatic. This mint is apple variety from Three Sisters Garden. I definitely see some mojitos in my future! :D

    Speaking of the beef . . .

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    Charcoal-Grilled Strip Steaks
    Marinated for about 24 hours in soy sauce, oyster sauce, black pepper and a touch of granulated sugar. I dried them off thoroughly, then lightly oiled them before grilling.

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    Plated Up
    With some spicy-sweet broiled eggplant and a mound of getting-pretty-old-by-now reheated jasmine rice. :oops:

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #1970 - June 22nd, 2022, 7:36 pm
    Post #1970 - June 22nd, 2022, 7:36 pm Post #1970 - June 22nd, 2022, 7:36 pm
    I have also done both for rice powder and see no difference.

    Looking at what is occurring, there should be no difference. The pestle excels when you are releasing flavors by breaking down cell walls. That is not what is happening here. This is all about texture. I suppose you could over process in grinder and turn it into very fine flour. As long as you don’t do that, the grinder should be just as good.
  • Post #1971 - June 23rd, 2022, 1:34 pm
    Post #1971 - June 23rd, 2022, 1:34 pm Post #1971 - June 23rd, 2022, 1:34 pm
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    A different tuna salad from last time inspired by Pailin Chongchitnant: https://hot-thai-kitchen.com/thai-tuna-salad/
    In addition to Tuna contains Tomato, celery, lemon zest, cilantro, green onion, shallot and roasted peanuts. Dressing of Lime juice, fish sauce, palm sugar and hot sauce.
  • Post #1972 - June 23rd, 2022, 1:55 pm
    Post #1972 - June 23rd, 2022, 1:55 pm Post #1972 - June 23rd, 2022, 1:55 pm
    lougord99 wrote:I have also done both for rice powder and see no difference.

    Looking at what is occurring, there should be no difference. The pestle excels when you are releasing flavors by breaking down cell walls. That is not what is happening here. This is all about texture. I suppose you could over process in grinder and turn it into very fine flour. As long as you don’t do that, the grinder should be just as good.

    Yeah, I agree that it's not the same as with other types of ingredients, like herbs, garlic and other fresh alliums, chiles, spices, etc. I left it pretty coarse and turned out just fine. There are obviously some structural and textural differences within individual grains of toasted rice but for my palate, they were imperceptible when ground with the machine. I wouldn't hesitate to do it the same way again. The more applicable question is whether or not to include the lime leaf. I'm not sure I like it in there.

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #1973 - June 23rd, 2022, 2:07 pm
    Post #1973 - June 23rd, 2022, 2:07 pm Post #1973 - June 23rd, 2022, 2:07 pm
    As an aside, I learned a trick to clean out the grinder after processing anything. To get rid of flavors from the previous grind, grind some raw rice and wipe out. No need to wash.
  • Post #1974 - June 23rd, 2022, 2:11 pm
    Post #1974 - June 23rd, 2022, 2:11 pm Post #1974 - June 23rd, 2022, 2:11 pm
    lougord99 wrote:As an aside, I learned a trick to clean out the grinder after processing anything. To get rid of flavors from the previous grind, grind some raw rice and wipe out. No need to wash.

    Yep. That's what I always do. In this case, it was raw rice after toasted rice and if not for the lime leaf, probably not even necessary.

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #1975 - June 24th, 2022, 6:54 am
    Post #1975 - June 24th, 2022, 6:54 am Post #1975 - June 24th, 2022, 6:54 am
    Laab. I am on a little Pailin Chongchitnant kick ( I do like her channel ) : https://hot-thai-kitchen.com/laab-gai/
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    Bone-in thighs, fish sauce, lime juice, cilantro, fresh mint, shallot, rice and lime leaf. I used bone-in because I did not want a whole package and the next night I wanted bone-in for jerk chicken. Thighs are extremely easy to debone, especially in this case where you don't want whole thigh pieces.
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    First make toasted rice powder, which Ronnie has well documented. Then hand chop the thighs into smallish pieces. Cook the chicken in water and when done add all the other ingredients and serve over rice.
    Image
  • Post #1976 - June 24th, 2022, 7:06 am
    Post #1976 - June 24th, 2022, 7:06 am Post #1976 - June 24th, 2022, 7:06 am
    Belt. Suspenders. Fire extinguisher. Baking powder. 246 toothpicks on the floor.

    SheSimmers
    "You only need three things to make all this happen: a skillet, a coffee grinder (or a set of granite or glazed terracotta mortar and pestle), and the right type of rice, namely Thai sticky or glutinous rice. Some people say regular long grain rice works just as well, but I disagree. Long grain rice is much more dense than glutinous rice, and while the latter melds seamlessly into the dish, the former tends to create the undesirable gritty texture."
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1977 - June 25th, 2022, 7:05 am
    Post #1977 - June 25th, 2022, 7:05 am Post #1977 - June 25th, 2022, 7:05 am
    Image

    Jerk chicken on the grill and roasted potatoes.
  • Post #1978 - June 25th, 2022, 7:09 pm
    Post #1978 - June 25th, 2022, 7:09 pm Post #1978 - June 25th, 2022, 7:09 pm
    Another classic from Pailin Chongchitnant, Basil Chicken : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q_9rDq2gGmg.
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    Serrano, garlic, onion, green beans, chicken thigh, thai basil, eggs and a sauce of oyster sauce, soy sauce, fish sauce, water and palm sugar. Pound the serrano and garlic into a paste and stir fry on low heat. When fragrant add onions and green beans.
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    When onions are soft add chicken. stir fry until cooked and add sauce. cook and turn off heat. Add basil and serve over rice. Quickly heat more oil on very high heat until smoking and cook fried egg to serve over the dish.
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    I need to give 2 shout outs here. Thank you to Ronnie for letting me know that the Richwell Market on Dempster almost always has Thai Basil and an applause to Kraft for their boxes of Mac and Cheese that was easily made for my Grandson who would not consider tasting a dish like this.
  • Post #1979 - June 25th, 2022, 10:58 pm
    Post #1979 - June 25th, 2022, 10:58 pm Post #1979 - June 25th, 2022, 10:58 pm
    lougord99 wrote:Another classic from Pailin Chongchitnant, Basil Chicken : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q_9rDq2gGmg.
    Image
    Serrano, garlic, onion, green beans, chicken thigh, thai basil, eggs and a sauce of oyster sauce, soy sauce, fish sauce, water and palm sugar. Pound the serrano and garlic into a paste and stir fry on low heat. When fragrant add onions and green beans.
    Image
    When onions are soft add chicken. stir fry until cooked and add sauce. cook and turn off heat. Add basil and serve over rice. Quickly heat more oil on very high heat until smoking and cook fried egg to serve over the dish.
    Image

    I need to give 2 shout outs here. Thank you to Ronnie for letting me know that the Richwell Market on Dempster almost always has Thai Basil and an applause to Kraft for their boxes of Mac and Cheese that was easily made for my Grandson who would not consider tasting a dish like this.

    Looks tasty, Lou. Glad to be of help re: Richwell. It's a tremendous resource. Too bad about your grandson not being an adventurous eater . . . yet. Hopefully, he'll come around. :)

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #1980 - June 26th, 2022, 6:45 pm
    Post #1980 - June 26th, 2022, 6:45 pm Post #1980 - June 26th, 2022, 6:45 pm
    lougord99 wrote:. . . Richwell Market on Dempster almost always has Thai Basil . . .

    ps and FYI, they also usually have Thai birds eye chiles, if you ever want to sub them in for the serranos you've been using. They keep very well in the freezer if you pack them carefully.

    Tonight, we wook another swing at Northern Chinese-style cumin lamb. But first, some side-dishery . . .

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    Fioretto Mise En Place & Teruyasu Fujiwara Wa Denka Gyuto, 210mm
    Veg oil, 2021-batch homemade cherry bomb sambal, fioretto, red hot finger chiles, minced ginger, leftover carrot, hot banana peppers, minced garlic, semi-dried fresh shiitakes, cho hou paste and soy bean sauce.

    Image
    Stir-Fried Fioretto
    Was happy to get RID of some items taking up room in the fridge, especially that annoying half-a-carrot! :lol:

    Next up, lamb prep . . .

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    Lamb Mise En Place & Teruyasu Fujiwara Wa Denka Gyuto, 210mm
    Yellow onion, dried heaven-facing chiles, Kashmiri chile powder, salt (hiding), coarsely ground cumin, sliced jalapenos, sliced lamb* and rougly chopped cilantro.
    *The lamb was mid-process here. It had been rinsed in a 'tea' of ginger and Sichuan peppercorns and was on its way to being briefly fried in oil. After that, it was ready for the final stir-fry, which came together very quickly . . .

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    Northern-Style Cumin Lamb Stir-Fry
    Garnished with some of our seemingly endless supply of onion blossoms.

    Image
    Plated Up
    With the end (finally!) of the leftover/reheated jasmine rice. :)

    =R=
    Same planet, different world

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