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What are you making for dinner tonite?

What are you making for dinner tonite?
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  • Post #1501 - November 12th, 2021, 4:02 pm
    Post #1501 - November 12th, 2021, 4:02 pm Post #1501 - November 12th, 2021, 4:02 pm
    lougord99 wrote:[Thanks for the video, Gary. Made it tonight and it indeed is a different and very good variation on fried rice. I added cut up shrimp.


    Nice. Glad you liked the Golden fried rice. Shrimp is a good add. My usual fried rice M. O. Is to add a slew of ingredients. With this technique austere seems the way to go.
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1502 - November 13th, 2021, 7:03 am
    Post #1502 - November 13th, 2021, 7:03 am Post #1502 - November 13th, 2021, 7:03 am
    Haven't been all that hungry lately, light supper again. Jasmine rice, fried egg, furikake topped with Ronnie's terrific gochugaru version of my chili oil. Tasty, quick, delicious.

    Ellen had veal parm from Nottoli that she picked up after her haircut in the area. I tasted, thought it surprisingly good. But, then again, I tend to like Nottoli.

    click to enlarge
    Image
    Image

    Rice, egg, chili oil, count me a Fan!


    Nottoli Italian Foods
    5025 N Harlem Ave
    Chicago, IL 60656
    nottoliitalianfoods.com
    773-631-0662
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1503 - November 13th, 2021, 7:33 pm
    Post #1503 - November 13th, 2021, 7:33 pm Post #1503 - November 13th, 2021, 7:33 pm
    Glad you like the oil, Gary. You changed my life by sharing that recipe and I'm truly grateful for it. I loves me some Nottoli, too but I haven't been since before the plague hit. I need to change that.

    Before and as part of dinner, I wanted to make a double batch of shallot oil -- some for us and some for my allium-restricted friend because even though she can't eat them, shallot oil is okay for her . . .

    Image
    Peeled, Halved Shallots & Konosuke YW White #2 Gyuto, 210mm
    'Twas a hefty load. Started with 1350g of whole, raw shallots and netted out at 1100g.

    Image
    Sliced Shallots
    I worked pretty fast but these took a while. The Kono and I made it through with nary a tear.

    Dumped the sliced shallots into a 9-quart dutch oven and covered them, + about 1", with cold veg oil. Medium heat and after what seemed like forever, they finally started to brown. The finished oil smells and tastes great but it isn't much to look at. The byproduct, on the other hand, is one of the best byproducts there is, maybe even better than the primary product . . .

    Image
    Crispy Fried Shallots

    Next up, dinner. It's normally not my cut but I saw and cute little piece of beef tenderloin in the case at Zier's. For filet, it was pretty well marbled, so I decided to plunk down for it . . .

    Image
    Mini Beef Tenderloin "Roast"
    Oiled and seasoned. This was actually two ends deftly trussed together by the crew at Zier's. Low and slow in a 200F oven, until the internal temperature hit 120F. After that, pull it, crank the oven to 450F convection, and put the roast back in a for a few minutes, rotating it once.

    Image
    Plated Up
    Garnished with chives and some of the crispy shallots. With a pan gravy made from some gelatinous beef stock I made last week and some freshly minced shallots. Served with steamed broccoli.

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #1504 - November 14th, 2021, 7:08 pm
    Post #1504 - November 14th, 2021, 7:08 pm Post #1504 - November 14th, 2021, 7:08 pm
    Full-on beef shanks -- not veal -- so, not quite osso bucco but pretty much in the same style . . .

    Image
    Mise En Place & Kobayashi R2/SG2 Gyuto, 210mm
    Beef shanks, AP flour, black pepper, diced tomatoes, parsley fronds, red wine, evoo, celery ribs, carrot, yellow & red onion, green bell pepper, bay leaves & smashed garlic cloves and celery leaves.

    On the equipment side, I was really impressed by the Kobayashi. It's very laser-like, which I'd kind of forgotten. It glided effortlessly through the carrots, yet its thin tip was as precise as anything making the initial vertical cuts in the onions. The rondeau you'll see below is a relatively new, 10-quart stainless-clad from Made In. I've used it a few times now and my initial impressions are that I love it. 12.75" across and nearly 4.5" tall, it's the perfect vessel for this type of cook. It provides ample surface area and is high enough to get everything in there without issue. But it's not so big that it cannot be used easily on a residential-sized burner. And once the stove top portion was completed, I put on the lid and moved it into the oven without any worries or concerns.

    Image
    Sear
    Beef shanks, seasoned with salt and black pepper, then dusted with flour, the shanks get browned in evoo, then removed.

    Image
    Fond
    After the shanks are browned, the veg goes in and the steam they produce lifts the fond from the bottom of the rondeau.

    Image
    Liquids
    Once the fond is fully incorporated, the wine, tomatoes and herbs are added. After this, the shanks are returned, the rondeau gets covered (for all but the last hour of the cook), and it goes into a 275F oven for a few hours -- occasionally tended, basted and what have you -- until the shanks are tender.

    Image
    Plated Up
    Braised beef shanks osso bucco-style with long grain rice. Garnished with crispy shallots and gremolata (lemon zest, parsley, micro-grated garlic and chives).

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #1505 - November 15th, 2021, 6:51 am
    Post #1505 - November 15th, 2021, 6:51 am Post #1505 - November 15th, 2021, 6:51 am
    ronnie_suburban wrote:I worked pretty fast but these took a while. The Kono and I made it through with nary a tear.

    Dumped the sliced shallots into a 9-quart dutch oven and covered them, + about 1", with cold veg oil. Medium heat and after what seemed like forever, they finally started to brown. The finished oil smells and tastes great but it isn't much to look at. The byproduct, on the other hand, is one of the best byproducts there is, maybe even better than the primary product . . .
    =R=
    Looks good.

    Just a trick for those that haven't thought about it. When slicing any kind of onion, put your cutting board on the stove top, turn your exhaust fan on high and let it run for a minute, then start slicing. If your exhaust fan has some power you won't get any tears. Even without much power, the tears will be reduced.

    As for the fried shallots, there was no reason to keep the heat low. Yes, start in cold oil, but let the heat rip. As long as the oil only barely covers the shallots ( I actually start with the oil below the level of the shallots because they will reduce) and as long as you regularly stir the shallots, the water that the shallots give off will keep the oil at a very low temp. If you are making a lot of oil to shallot ratio then you simply need to stir more often to keep the oil temp down. The whole process does not need to take more than 15 minutes. You only need to reduce the burner temp as the shallots start to turn color and then you need to constantly stir until they are finish. Turn the heat off completely before they reach the brownness that you want as they will continue to cook in the residual heat.
  • Post #1506 - November 15th, 2021, 8:11 am
    Post #1506 - November 15th, 2021, 8:11 am Post #1506 - November 15th, 2021, 8:11 am
    I imagine you don't want to discard that oil after frying shallots either -- another gift that keeps on giving.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #1507 - November 15th, 2021, 10:04 am
    Post #1507 - November 15th, 2021, 10:04 am Post #1507 - November 15th, 2021, 10:04 am
    JoelF wrote:I imagine you don't want to discard that oil after frying shallots either -- another gift that keeps on giving.

    No, definitely not. The oil was the intended purpose, mainly for my allium restricted friend. The oil, she can handle.

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #1508 - November 15th, 2021, 1:58 pm
    Post #1508 - November 15th, 2021, 1:58 pm Post #1508 - November 15th, 2021, 1:58 pm
    I've got 2 butts smoking on my 26" kettle that should be done by dinner time. I've got 1 1/4 lb ham hocks in the instant pot to which I'll add carrots, celery, onion and a pound of dried split peas when it depressurizes.

    Probably go with pulled pork for dinner.
  • Post #1509 - November 15th, 2021, 7:39 pm
    Post #1509 - November 15th, 2021, 7:39 pm Post #1509 - November 15th, 2021, 7:39 pm
    HankB wrote:I've got 2 butts smoking on my 26" kettle that should be done by dinner time. I've got 1 1/4 lb ham hocks in the instant pot to which I'll add carrots, celery, onion and a pound of dried split peas when it depressurizes.

    Probably go with pulled pork for dinner.

    That all sounds very comforting, especially with the temps dropping and flurries all about. Sad to say that the last time I used ham hocks (in some lentil soup last week), they were store-bought. :(

    As for tonight, another Monday stir fry. I know virtually nothing about noodles but did I let that stop me? No. Of course not. I picked up some fresh wheat noodles at H Mart and decided to give them a go . . .

    Image
    Mise En Place & Kobayashi R2/SG2 Gyuto, 210mm
    U-26 shrimp, long beans, wheat noodles, minced garlic, fermented black beans, minced ginger, scallion tops, scallion bottoms, red onion, veg oil, freshly ground Sichuan peppercorns, Chinese-inspired spice blend, sesame paste, hoisin sauce, toasted sesame oil, dark soy and soy sauce.

    The shrimp go into to wok to sear in veg oil. 2-3 minutes, shrimp out. The veg and aromatics go in next, followed by the liquids and the sesame paste, which form the sauce. Meanwhile, noodles are cooking separately in water. Once mostly cooked, drain them and add to sauce. They're pretty starchy, so the sauce thickens and clings to them well. Next up, add a dash of the sesame oil to taste and add the shrimp back. Stir to combine then offload to a platter.

    Image
    Stir Fry Noodles With Shrimp

    Image
    Plated Up
    Garnished with crispy fried shallots, homemade chili oil, LGM spicy chili crisp, scallion tops and cilantro leaves.

    Gotta say, this one turned out very well, especially considering I'd never done it before.

    Happy Monday! :)

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #1510 - November 16th, 2021, 7:16 pm
    Post #1510 - November 16th, 2021, 7:16 pm Post #1510 - November 16th, 2021, 7:16 pm
    Super simple but tasty dinner tonight. Back to one on the main course. But first, side dishery . . .

    Image
    Red Cabbage & Saji R-2 Gyuto, 210mm
    This pile started out as two cute little red cabbages.

    And what week would be complete without grilled chicken thighs? :P

    Image
    On The Platter
    I typically make my own rubs but this time out, I tried one from Penzey's -- 33rd & Galena Seasoning -- and thought it was pretty good. It doesn't contain salt but no problem hitting the bird with some of our byo salt first.

    Image
    Plated Up
    Charcoal-grilled chicken thighs with braised red cabbage (evoo, salt, black pepper, unfiltered apple cider vinegar, Tupelo honey and a dash of soy sauce).

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #1511 - November 17th, 2021, 7:33 pm
    Post #1511 - November 17th, 2021, 7:33 pm Post #1511 - November 17th, 2021, 7:33 pm
    Back to a new, old favorite tonight: pad ka-prao . . .

    Image
    Mise En Place & Sukenari ZDP189 Hairline Gyuto, 210mm
    Thai basil leaves, coarsely ground pork, shallots, garlic, Thai birds eye chiles, long beans, veg oil, sweet soy, Golden Mountain, soy sauce, fish sauce and oyster sauce. From here, before everything comes together in the wok, the garlic, shallots and chiles get ground into chunky paste in a mortar.

    Image
    Plated Up
    Pad Ka-Prao topped with scallions and frizzled quail eggs. Wow, those little buggers were tough to open. The shells were delicate and unlike most chicken eggs, the interior membranes were very tough. This combination made it really hard to open them cleanly.

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #1512 - November 17th, 2021, 8:03 pm
    Post #1512 - November 17th, 2021, 8:03 pm Post #1512 - November 17th, 2021, 8:03 pm
    I have never tried quail eggs. I assume they have a different flavor than chicken eggs.
  • Post #1513 - November 17th, 2021, 8:19 pm
    Post #1513 - November 17th, 2021, 8:19 pm Post #1513 - November 17th, 2021, 8:19 pm
    lougord99 wrote:I have never tried quail eggs. I assume they have a different flavor than chicken eggs.

    I find them very similar in flavor to chicken eggs. If there's a difference, it'd be hard for me to discern or describe it.

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #1514 - November 18th, 2021, 1:47 pm
    Post #1514 - November 18th, 2021, 1:47 pm Post #1514 - November 18th, 2021, 1:47 pm
    I used to buy quail eggs frequently when I lived in Chile; they were as easy to find in the store as chicken eggs. It was fun to use them to make one-bite hard-boiled (sometimes deviled) eggs. That's actually about the only thing I can think of using them for, but I do like hard-boiled eggs a lot.

    I'm not in the crowd that likes to put an egg on top of practically anything, but it seems to me that when you do want an egg on top of something, a quail egg would be enough.

    Some Asian markets and once in a while a farmers' market seem to be the only places to find them around here. I wouldn't make a special trip to buy quail eggs, but if I saw them in a store, I would buy them.

    Now that I think about it again, I remember that there was an LTH thread (which I'll hunt up later) some time ago in which I expressed my fondness for quail eggs, and some kind soul gave me some tips on where to find them in Chicagoland.

    A woman I knew in Chile told me that when she was young, pregnant women were encouraged to add a quail egg to soup or noodles or such dishes --- for the cheap extra protein, I assume, Chile having been a poorer country then. Given the differences in fowl/egg safety between the US and other countries, I wonder what the USDA would think of pregnant women cracking a raw quail egg over their ramen these days.
    "Your swimming suit matches your eyes, you hold your nose before diving, loving you has made me bananas!"
  • Post #1515 - November 18th, 2021, 9:21 pm
    Post #1515 - November 18th, 2021, 9:21 pm Post #1515 - November 18th, 2021, 9:21 pm
    As to the trouble Ronnie mentioned in getting the shells off quail eggs, I would guess that steaming them in an Instant Pot or other pressure cooker would make shelling them as effortless as it does chicken eggs, but I don't know how many minutes it would take---fewer, I presume, than the 5-5-5 (come to pressure - cook time -- natural release) required for chicken eggs. I'll search for an answer to that online and maybe do my own tests and report back.
    "Your swimming suit matches your eyes, you hold your nose before diving, loving you has made me bananas!"
  • Post #1516 - November 18th, 2021, 10:10 pm
    Post #1516 - November 18th, 2021, 10:10 pm Post #1516 - November 18th, 2021, 10:10 pm
    Long ago poster MHays, remember her? She raises quails. One of the first questions I asked was about shelling quail eggs. I don't even recall the answer, though quail eggs are really hard to crack from my experience.

    Regards,
    CAthy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #1517 - November 18th, 2021, 11:22 pm
    Post #1517 - November 18th, 2021, 11:22 pm Post #1517 - November 18th, 2021, 11:22 pm
    Katie wrote:As to the trouble Ronnie mentioned in getting the shells off quail eggs, I would guess that steaming them in an Instant Pot or other pressure cooker would make shelling them as effortless as it does chicken eggs, but I don't know how many minutes it would take---fewer, I presume, than the 5-5-5 (come to pressure - cook time -- natural release) required for chicken eggs. I'll search for an answer to that online and maybe do my own tests and report back.

    I think the IP would work great but remember, I was trying to fry them, not hard-cook them, so it wouldn't have been much use to me in this instance.

    A number of sources recommended using scissors to cut them open and I did try that on a couple of them but when I cut high (near the tip), the hole wasn't big enough for the yolk to pass through. When I cut low (middle of the eggs), I ended up breaking the yolks or squirting the contents out, all over the place. These eggs did have some age on them, so maybe that was part of the issue. Next time I buy them, I'll be sure use them right away and see if it makes a difference.

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #1518 - November 19th, 2021, 10:00 am
    Post #1518 - November 19th, 2021, 10:00 am Post #1518 - November 19th, 2021, 10:00 am
    ronnie_suburban wrote:
    Katie wrote:As to the trouble Ronnie mentioned in getting the shells off quail eggs, I would guess that steaming them in an Instant Pot or other pressure cooker would make shelling them as effortless as it does chicken eggs, but I don't know how many minutes it would take---fewer, I presume, than the 5-5-5 (come to pressure - cook time -- natural release) required for chicken eggs. I'll search for an answer to that online and maybe do my own tests and report back.

    I think the IP would work great but remember, I was trying to fry them, not hard-cook them, so it wouldn't have been much use to me in this instance.

    A number of sources recommended using scissors to cut them open and I did try that on a couple of them but when I cut high (near the tip), the hole wasn't big enough for the yolk to pass through. When I cut low (middle of the eggs), I ended up breaking the yolks or squirting the contents out, all over the place. These eggs did have some age on them, so maybe that was part of the issue. Next time I buy them, I'll be sure use them right away and see if it makes a difference.

    =R=


    You might also try using a pair of cuticle scissors and cutting off the top first, then down from there. A lot of work but should have a better result than trying to crack them, even if fresh.
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #1519 - November 19th, 2021, 10:34 am
    Post #1519 - November 19th, 2021, 10:34 am Post #1519 - November 19th, 2021, 10:34 am
    boudreaulicious wrote:You might also try using a pair of cuticle scissors and cutting off the top first, then down from there. A lot of work but should have a better result than trying to crack them, even if fresh.

    I think you're right. Smaller scissors would have probably helped. Thanks!

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #1520 - November 20th, 2021, 8:38 pm
    Post #1520 - November 20th, 2021, 8:38 pm Post #1520 - November 20th, 2021, 8:38 pm
    Tonight, a bigos-style stew . . .

    Image
    Mise En Place & Kohetsu Blue #2 Tall Gyuto, 240mm
    There ended up being more to it than this but this was the foundation, most of it store-bought: smoked ribs, assorted sausages (kielbasa, grilling sausages, wedding sausage and pork wieners), yellow onion, sauerkraut, Polish bacon & smoked/cured shoulder and fresh cabbage.

    Using a 12-quart stock pot, I started by browning the sausage pieces, and then removed them (they go back in at the end so their flavor doesn't wash out). Next up, the bacon and shoulder go in. Once they start to render, in go the onions and some minced garlic (not pictured above). After that all intermingles, the raw cabbage goes in and cooks until it softens up and shrinks down. After that happens, in goes the sauerkraut. Again, all of gets mixed together and cooks until some liquid starts to form and the covered pot produces some steam. From there, the big piece of pig skin and the ribs go in. The pot is covered and simmers on low until it's suitably reduced and the ribs are soft, about 2 hours. After that, season with salt, black pepper, a splash of apple cider vinegar and a bit of tart apple juice concentrate, which does a nice job of imparting sweetness and tartness without adding much additional moisture. Mix it all together, add back the sausage, simmer for a bit and serve.

    Image
    Plated Up
    Garnished with chives and served with some more of that great Polish rye bread.

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #1521 - November 21st, 2021, 7:05 pm
    Post #1521 - November 21st, 2021, 7:05 pm Post #1521 - November 21st, 2021, 7:05 pm
    Another Sunday braise. This time, boneless leg of lamb. But first, side dishery . . .

    Image
    Spinach-Feta Casserole Mise En Place & Sukenari ZDP189 Hairline Gyuto, 210mm
    Black pepper, salt, minced garlic, chive cheese, sauteed creminis, dill weed, feta, wilted/squeezed baby spinach, lemon, dried oregano, evoo and sauteed onions.

    Prepping and sauteing the mushrooms and onions, and wilting/squeezing out two pounds of spinach takes time and requires a bunch of equipment/washing. It's a lot for such a 'simple' dish but well worth it, IMO.

    Image
    Lamb Mise En Place & Sukenari ZDP189 Hairline Gyuto, 210mm
    Celery leaves, dried mint, celery ribs, dill weed & parsley fronds, salt, smashed garlic cloves, salt, carrot, dried oregano, black pepper, diced tomatoes, tomato paste, red wine, boneless leg of lamb and evoo.

    Standard sear > braise . . .

    Image
    Sear
    Seasoned leg of lamb -- salt, black pepper, dried mint, dried oregano -- searing in evoo.

    Image
    Ready To Braise
    After the sear, veg goes in, fond releases, then wine, tomato products and fresh herbs follow. 275F covered for 3 hours, basting occasionally. Uncovered for another hour until lamb is tender and slightly crusty on the outside.

    Image
    Plated Up
    Braised leg of lamb and 'spanakopita' casserole.

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #1522 - November 24th, 2021, 7:47 pm
    Post #1522 - November 24th, 2021, 7:47 pm Post #1522 - November 24th, 2021, 7:47 pm
    While Thanksgiving prep was going on, managed to fire up the wok and make some dinner . . .

    Image
    Plated Up
    Stir-fried fioretto, tofu noodles and leftover charsiu pork with a side of sweet & sour eggplant.

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #1523 - November 26th, 2021, 3:58 pm
    Post #1523 - November 26th, 2021, 3:58 pm Post #1523 - November 26th, 2021, 3:58 pm
    Not dinner but a quickie, impromptu, RID, stir-fry lunch . . .

    Image
    Stir-Fried Charsiu Pork & Fried Tofu
    Garlic, ginger, onions, shallots, broad bean paste, Sichuan pepper, soy, dark soy, aromatic chicken stock & corn starch slurry.
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #1524 - November 27th, 2021, 7:47 pm
    Post #1524 - November 27th, 2021, 7:47 pm Post #1524 - November 27th, 2021, 7:47 pm
    When it comes to meatloaf, I think there are generally two schools of thought. One is the ketchup-glazed crowd and the other is the brown gravy crowd. I lean toward the latter group but like it either way. My late MIL used to make it the ketchupy way and it was delicious. But we're not exactly sure where her recipe is right now. So, given my preference and our general lack of information -- I can't remember ever having made meatloaf before -- we went with the brown gravy version today. First up, making the gravy . . .

    Image
    Brown Gravy Mise En Place & Harukaze G3 Nashiji Gyuto, 210mm
    4x gelatinous beef stock, salt, butter, dried porcini, minced shallots & bay leaf, A/P flour, fresh, diced creminis and black pepper.

    Sauteed the fresh mushrooms and shallots in butter, then added flour to make a roux. Added in the stock with an additional 3 parts water, brought it to a simmer, then added the bay leaf and dried porcinis. Once it had reduced and thickened, I seasoned it and it was mostly good to go. Though, after the loaf had baked, there were some pan drippings, which I added to the gravy (does that make it a sauce?).

    Next up the loaf . . .

    Image
    Meatloaf Mise En Place & Harukaze G3 Nashiji Gyuto, 210mm
    Ground beef & pork, granulated onion, granulated garlic, eggs, leftover sauteed onions from Thanksgiving, sauteed creminis, salt, black pepper and panko.

    Mixed the eggs and the panko to create a sort of panade, then mixed it and everything else together create the loaf. I like my meatloaf extra crusty, so I went free-form -- rather than using a loaf pan -- to maximize the exterior crustiness . . .

    Image
    Meatloaf
    ~15 minutes at 450F convection to "lock" the shape, then maybe another hour at 350F until the interior temp hit 150F.

    Image
    Plated Up
    Meatloaf with brown gravy, plus leftover spinach-feta casserole and leftover sweet & sour eggplant. Sometimes, the simplest things are the best.

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #1525 - Yesterday, 7:10 pm
    Post #1525 - Yesterday, 7:10 pm Post #1525 - Yesterday, 7:10 pm
    Not hosting Thanksgiving means virtually no leftovers :(, so I've been cooking most of the weekend. Today, a comforting family fave, Chile Verde Pork Stew . . .

    Image
    Mise En Place & Nigara SG2 Tsuchime Gyuto, 210mm
    Pork shoulder chunks, Mexican-style spice blend (salt, pepper, granulated garlic & onion, cumin, ancho chile powder and Mexican oregano), cilantro, roasted poblanos and other roasted veggies (tomatillos, jalapenos, serranos, garlic and onion).

    All of the above -- except for the meat and spice blend -- get pureed in the blender to create the chile verde part of the dish. Separately, the meat gets seasoned, then seared in veg oil. Once that's done, the pureed chile is poured over . . .

    Image
    The Simmer Begins
    Seared pork, steamed with a bit of pork stock to release the fond. From here, the whole business gets mixed together, covered and simmered until the pork is tender and the chile reduces a bit. At the very end, I re-seasoned it with some more Mexican oregano and added some of the roasted onion and poblano (held back from earlier and diced up).

    Image
    Plated Up
    Chile Verde Pork Stew, garnished with cilantro leaves, crema and cotija. Served with some Rancho Gordo King City Pink Beans -- a variety I'd never seen from them before -- and some Mexican Restaurant-style rice.

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #1526 - Today, 5:37 am
    Post #1526 - Today, 5:37 am Post #1526 - Today, 5:37 am
    Looks so good, I need to make that tonight.

    If anyone wants to make this dish faster than slow cooking, Kenji has a good recipe for the pressure cooker.
    https://www.seriouseats.com/easy-pressu ... rde-recipe

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