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What are you making for dinner tonite?

What are you making for dinner tonite?
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  • Post #1141 - September 2nd, 2020, 1:37 pm
    Post #1141 - September 2nd, 2020, 1:37 pm Post #1141 - September 2nd, 2020, 1:37 pm
    Using a 6+ lb can of San Marzano tomatoes from Costco to make a pasta sauce.
  • Post #1142 - September 3rd, 2020, 8:26 am
    Post #1142 - September 3rd, 2020, 8:26 am Post #1142 - September 3rd, 2020, 8:26 am
    Hatch chiles from Jewel? Check.
    Last night was green chile cheeseburgers. Tonight is green chile porkchops.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #1143 - September 3rd, 2020, 8:56 am
    Post #1143 - September 3rd, 2020, 8:56 am Post #1143 - September 3rd, 2020, 8:56 am
    Last night's late dinner was raspberries and whipping cream.
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #1144 - September 3rd, 2020, 9:06 am
    Post #1144 - September 3rd, 2020, 9:06 am Post #1144 - September 3rd, 2020, 9:06 am
    Cathy2 wrote:Last night's late dinner was raspberries and whipping cream.


    You sure you're not a Yooper?
    We cannot be friends if you do not know the difference between Mayo and Miracle Whip.
  • Post #1145 - September 3rd, 2020, 4:22 pm
    Post #1145 - September 3rd, 2020, 4:22 pm Post #1145 - September 3rd, 2020, 4:22 pm
    seebee wrote:
    Cathy2 wrote:Last night's late dinner was raspberries and whipping cream.


    You sure you're not a Yooper?

    If that is life as a Yooper, count me in!
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #1146 - September 3rd, 2020, 8:31 pm
    Post #1146 - September 3rd, 2020, 8:31 pm Post #1146 - September 3rd, 2020, 8:31 pm
    People in my household either went to bed early or were on a zoom meeting. I had dinner by myself of stove-roasted eggplants mashed up with butter and salt, then spread on bread. It was an idea I saw here.

    First round was the garlic and tomato rubbed on the toast before applying the eggplant. This was not a great joy to eat.

    Second round was garlic rubbed on the toast, butter spread on the toast and very likely the winning factor of more aggressively seasoning the eggplant. This round was more convincing to give it a try someday in the future.

    Cookbook selection of Fresh from Poland is stirring my Eastern European roots-by-association. At lunch, I served sauerkraut pancakes with sour cream to accompany the last of the beet soup.

    I am making this author's version of Farmers Cheese using buttermilk, sour cream and heavy cream. I never experienced a butterfat rich Farmers cheese. I made tvork (aka farmers cheese) with milk on the edge of spoiling or if it was not spoiled, I would add Kefir to push it along.

    This recipe for Farmers Cheese suggests Kajmak cheese from Yugoslavia, which I make a faux variant with butter, cream cheese and sour cream.

    In this book, they have an item referred to as Kajmak, which is very unexpected: gently boil for two-three hours a sealed can of sweetened condensed milk. Yes, what we know as dulce de leche.

    I need to read the introduction to understand who the authors are better.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #1147 - September 5th, 2020, 6:22 pm
    Post #1147 - September 5th, 2020, 6:22 pm Post #1147 - September 5th, 2020, 6:22 pm
    Breakfast today was Polish apple fritters with cinnamon applesauce. I have seen these at Shop and Save's deli counter called Racuchy. It was a thick batter with chopped apples folded in, then cooked like a pancake on a griddle. After I prepped the apples, it was suggested apples could be replaced by blueberries, raspberries or chopped plums. I am pretty sure the blueberry variant will need extra buttermilk, because the apple juices did loosen the batter.

    Lunch was Breton Beans with dried tomatoes instead of sausage. Could not be easier or faster to put together: cook onions in butter, then add marjoram, paprika, allspice berries, black peppercorns stirred together until fragrant. I added some stewed tomatoes which were immediately mashed with a potato masher, then two cans of drained cannellini beans, chopped dried tomatoes and good old salt and pepper to taste. This was accompanied by sauerkraut fritters with sour cream.

    An odd meal for a day hovering toward 80 degrees, but it will be repeated this winter with great enthusiasm.

    This is the most I have ever cooked for any cookbook club selection of three I have belonged to.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #1148 - September 13th, 2020, 8:32 pm
    Post #1148 - September 13th, 2020, 8:32 pm Post #1148 - September 13th, 2020, 8:32 pm
    Hi,

    I walk into stores with items needed at home, then see what is available.

    At Woodman's the other evening, I lucked out by encountering their big bag of bananas for 99 cents. I later weighed to find it was just over 10 pounds. We ate some, a loaf of banana bread was made with the rest was mashed and frozen for future loaves of banana bread.

    In their marked down vegetables, they had two pounds of mushrooms for 99 cents. I bought four pounds of mushrooms and exhibiting some restraint resisted another two pounds.

    I made a mushroom lasagna with 1.5 pounds. Two pounds went to Sophia Loren's mushroom sauce, which is frozen for another day. A half pound went to Mushrooms in sour cream sauce.

    At Aldi sometime ago, my sister bought a lot of jars of Morello cherries at a very favorable price. She does not remember the price nor will she fess up on how many jars she has at home. She recently dropped off two jars to use and more to follow, if I liked it.

    Sometime ago, I saw Darra Goldstein had an old Russian recipe of veal cooked with sour cherries. When I went to hunt it down, I found several variations attributed to her. One variation finished with white beans added at the end. Other variations had frozen or fresh cherries and others with jarred cherries. The meat depending on the recipe was pork, beef or veal. I settled on the one with frozen or fresh, but used jarred, because it was flavored with cinnamon stick, a pod of cardamon and a bay leaf. The beef was browned, then everything else into the pot, brought to a boil and simmered in the oven.

    This flavorful dish was served over porcini mushroom noodles. I bought it for it's suggested promise of a hint of mushroom flavor. The hint of mushroom flavor just did not exist. What's left will likely go into tuna noodle casserole, because it is an honorable way to finish these noodles.

    Leftovers for a day, which will clear out the fridge.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast

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