LTH Home

Induction burner

Induction burner
  • Forum HomePost Reply BackTop
  • Induction burner

    Post #1 - April 21st, 2008, 6:26 am
    Post #1 - April 21st, 2008, 6:26 am Post #1 - April 21st, 2008, 6:26 am
    We're going to be remodeling a kitchen in a house we're buying, and we're going to be without most appliances for probably about 2-3 months. (It's a full gut and remodel complete with moving electrical, walls, plumbing, etc.). Thus, we're thinking of picking up 1-2 portable induction burners which we'd love to have anyways.

    Does anyone have a view on one induction burner versus another?
  • Post #2 - September 3rd, 2008, 8:52 am
    Post #2 - September 3rd, 2008, 8:52 am Post #2 - September 3rd, 2008, 8:52 am
    Not that I really need it, but saw an ad for a Viking induction burner that you plug into an outlet. I have many questions. Will it overload the fuses? Do I need to or should I buy the Viking. (may have been Wolf). What advantages do I have with the induction v. gas. Any thoughts would be appreciated.

    Babaluch
  • Post #3 - September 3rd, 2008, 9:31 am
    Post #3 - September 3rd, 2008, 9:31 am Post #3 - September 3rd, 2008, 9:31 am
    If you're talking about something like this http://www.surlatable.com/product/539783.do, it's rated 1800 watts. If you normally have fuse troubles with things like hair dryers, your wiring may not support it.

    I've cooked lots of stuff on induction burners and I think they are fantastic. They're sort of halfway between electric and gas burners in my experience. They respond very quickly to temperature settings (like gas, unlike electric), which can be good or bad depending on how you cook and your pans. There is no heating element in an induction unit. The pan becomes the heating unit. If your pan will hold a magnet, it'll work, but definitely consider heavy duty pans

    There is also very little heating outside of the pan (like electric, unlike gas). Gas burners are sort of inefficient because some of the heat is deflected off the bottom of the pan, out around the sides, and it rises away unused to heat up your kitchen. Much less of that in an electric burner. Pretty much none of it in an induction burner. The only heat you feel is radiating from the pan itself.

    If I had the $$$, I'd mod my stove with two gas and two induction burners. I still like gas because you can't char a pepper on an induction burner or toast a tortilla or warm a pita etc. And you definitely can't an induction burner to flame pan sauces, one of the more enjoyable cooking-with-fire activities in my kitchen.
    got Mavrik?
    radiopeter.com
  • Post #4 - September 3rd, 2008, 2:52 pm
    Post #4 - September 3rd, 2008, 2:52 pm Post #4 - September 3rd, 2008, 2:52 pm
    I wrote a review of induction cooktops for CHOW http://www.chow.com/stories/10440 before the Viking model came out. If you're looking for a starter unit I still recommend Mr. Induction by Sunpentown - less than $200. Yes, retro name, but really good performer. The French Pastry School uses these same units in their kitchens.
  • Post #5 - September 3rd, 2008, 6:09 pm
    Post #5 - September 3rd, 2008, 6:09 pm Post #5 - September 3rd, 2008, 6:09 pm
    I'm really happy to have seen this thread. There have been others in the past that didn't really go anywhere.

    I recently moved into a new apartment that has a ceramic cooktop and I've been very unhappy with it. I've been inches away from pulling the trigger on the 1800w Apogee for a few months. (The best price I've seen seems to be through theinductionsite.com, just as an FYI.) But I hadn't been able to talk to anyone that'd actually used them.

    I suppose this answers my questions.
    -Pete
  • Post #6 - March 19th, 2010, 9:06 am
    Post #6 - March 19th, 2010, 9:06 am Post #6 - March 19th, 2010, 9:06 am
    hey all, looking to try out an induction cooktop without refitting my kitchen, figured a single plug-in unit would be good. found a fairly wide range online with mixed reviews, wondering if anyone here has any experience with one.

    probably not doing anything too fancy to start with, just boiling water and basic stirfrying i think.

    thanks
  • Post #7 - March 19th, 2010, 11:44 am
    Post #7 - March 19th, 2010, 11:44 am Post #7 - March 19th, 2010, 11:44 am
    Cook's Illustrated tested induction burners in January. The relatively inexpensive Max Burton model came out on top.

    http://www.cooksillustrated.com/equipme ... ocid=21517
  • Post #8 - March 19th, 2010, 2:09 pm
    Post #8 - March 19th, 2010, 2:09 pm Post #8 - March 19th, 2010, 2:09 pm
    whoops, looks like i got merged with an older thread. fair enough.

    louisa's article mentions sous vide applications which have me even more curious... of course i assume without a proper thermal circulator i'll still be checking in on it a little too often.
  • Post #9 - March 20th, 2010, 8:11 am
    Post #9 - March 20th, 2010, 8:11 am Post #9 - March 20th, 2010, 8:11 am
    I have the Burton single burner model which just helped me through a kitchen remodel. It worked great. If I have a complaint, it's that it heats up too quickly, too intensely (which ended up being great but took a little getting used to). My original plan was to sell it on Craigslist after the remodel, but I like it so much, I'm going to hang on to it.
  • Post #10 - March 22nd, 2010, 11:23 am
    Post #10 - March 22nd, 2010, 11:23 am Post #10 - March 22nd, 2010, 11:23 am
    Cook's Illustrated picked the Max Burton 1800-watt unit, reasoably priced at $120, as the top induction single-burner unit. Plugs into a wall outlet. I ordered it from Amazon for the $120 and I'm still getting used to it, but it is a real wonder for speed and control.

    A few days after I received it, I found it on the 'net for $75, postpaid.

    http://www.amazon.com/Max-Burton-6000-I ... 369&sr=1-1

    That spoiled my whole day. :evil:

    So, look around thoroughly. I think it's still a good buy for the $120.
    Suburban gourmand
  • Post #11 - July 3rd, 2012, 9:29 pm
    Post #11 - July 3rd, 2012, 9:29 pm Post #11 - July 3rd, 2012, 9:29 pm
    Any later updates on these things? I can't imagine any breakthroughs in a last couple years but I figure it's worth asking.
    This hot weather has me very hesitant to turn on the stove, especially a lot of heat for something like boiling pasta or potatoes or stir frying.
    I'm considering a single cooktop in the sub$100 range for use on the porch. Are the Max Burtons still topping the recommended lists?
  • Post #12 - July 8th, 2012, 1:29 pm
    Post #12 - July 8th, 2012, 1:29 pm Post #12 - July 8th, 2012, 1:29 pm
    I picked up a couple of 1200 units at newegg.com due to the fact that my house has an electrical fault that does not allow me to use the electric burners in the kitchen. I am saving up for a rebuilt kitchen with gas. The newegg units came with pans and were cheap - something like $50.

    Tuesday morning soon thereafter had a 1800 unit, $75. It works great in the back yard with a cast iron wok if the wok is allowed to heat up. I am not a fan of the thinner steel woks, but a flat bottom one should work well.
  • Post #13 - June 28th, 2014, 5:55 am
    Post #13 - June 28th, 2014, 5:55 am Post #13 - June 28th, 2014, 5:55 am
    I'm using an induction cooktop and trying to figure out how to translate the "warm, medium, hot" of an electric or gas cooktop with the degrees (and/or wattage) on the induction top

    What are the temperature ranges of "warm" 110-140?, medium? high ...
  • Post #14 - June 28th, 2014, 6:51 am
    Post #14 - June 28th, 2014, 6:51 am Post #14 - June 28th, 2014, 6:51 am
    I think it would be difficult to translate 'Medium' on one electric cooktop to 'medium' on another, let alone to a completely different type of cooktop. I find that efficient use of a cooktop only comes with experience in using it and knowing what will happen when you change a setting.
  • Post #15 - June 14th, 2022, 8:42 am
    Post #15 - June 14th, 2022, 8:42 am Post #15 - June 14th, 2022, 8:42 am
    xxxxxx
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #16 - June 14th, 2022, 8:52 am
    Post #16 - June 14th, 2022, 8:52 am Post #16 - June 14th, 2022, 8:52 am
    petermavrik wrote:If I had the $$$, I'd mod my stove with two gas and two induction burners. I still like gas because you can't char a pepper on an induction burner or toast a tortilla or warm a pita etc. And you definitely can't an induction burner to flame pan sauces, one of the more enjoyable cooking-with-fire activities in my kitchen.

    This statement might have answered my question.

    I was at a program recently where a woman was recounting her Indian parents lives in a senior community. They have a small kitchen with an induction burner. Her mother has challenges getting the induction burner hot enough to crisp some Indian papadum (or something similar).

    Any thoughts on how they can accomplish this on an induction burner?

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #17 - June 14th, 2022, 12:12 pm
    Post #17 - June 14th, 2022, 12:12 pm Post #17 - June 14th, 2022, 12:12 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:
    petermavrik wrote:If I had the $$$, I'd mod my stove with two gas and two induction burners. I still like gas because you can't char a pepper on an induction burner or toast a tortilla or warm a pita etc. And you definitely can't an induction burner to flame pan sauces, one of the more enjoyable cooking-with-fire activities in my kitchen.

    This statement might have answered my question.

    I was at a program recently where a woman was recounting her Indian parents lives in a senior community. They have a small kitchen with an induction burner. Her mother has challenges getting the induction burner hot enough to crisp some Indian papadum (or something similar).

    Any thoughts on how they can accomplish this on an induction burner?

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    Reviewed.com wrote: On average, induction cooktops reach a maximum temperature of 665.5°F, compared to just 428°F for gas. While radiant electric cooktops can get hotter—741.8°F on average—they take a lot longer to cool down when switching from high to low heat.

    https://www.reviewed.com/ovens/features ... gh-science
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #18 - June 15th, 2022, 9:44 am
    Post #18 - June 15th, 2022, 9:44 am Post #18 - June 15th, 2022, 9:44 am
    Cathy, it may be that the pan she uses is not really induction-appropriate. A fairly hefty magnetic core, or a cast iron pan, works best. Maybe she's using a thin sheet steel tawa, or one made out of sort-of-magnetic stainless?

    Also, some of the cheap induction burners sold on Amazon/eBay may not have the power of ones on a range or at a restaurant.
  • Post #19 - June 17th, 2022, 7:27 am
    Post #19 - June 17th, 2022, 7:27 am Post #19 - June 17th, 2022, 7:27 am
    tjr wrote:Cathy, it may be that the pan she uses is not really induction-appropriate. A fairly hefty magnetic core, or a cast iron pan, works best. Maybe she's using a thin sheet steel tawa, or one made out of sort-of-magnetic stainless?

    I have had a feeling this might be the issue. It is complicated by this woman having weak wrists.

    I have seen a type of magnetic pad put on an induction burner to allow people to use non-induction pots and pans. I wonder if that might improve performance, if she is indeed using a tawa.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #20 - June 17th, 2022, 10:07 am
    Post #20 - June 17th, 2022, 10:07 am Post #20 - June 17th, 2022, 10:07 am
    There's quite a bit of variation in induction burners (as well as how they perform with different types/brands of cookware), so it's tough to make an informed decision based on a few anecdotal experiences. Like so much else, a little research goes a long way.

    I like induction but I cannot foresee ever choosing a kitchen that doesn't also have at least a couple gas burners. It's not just about charring peppers on an open flame but that's certainly part of it. Cooking is a blend of art and science and there are emotional aspects of it. It's a soulful act. Those considerations form the framework of how I want to outfit myself.

    Otoh, I had gas ovens for decades and thought I'd never get used to or like electric ovens. Now, 10+ years into electric, I love my electric ovens and readily admit that, at least for me, they're superior to the gas ones I used to have in just about every way. I was just being stubborn.

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #21 - June 18th, 2022, 6:25 am
    Post #21 - June 18th, 2022, 6:25 am Post #21 - June 18th, 2022, 6:25 am
    Eventually, you may not have a choice. Gas burners are being outlawed in many communities, the biggest so far being Los Angeles. New construction can only have electric burners, not gas.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #22 - June 18th, 2022, 6:36 am
    Post #22 - June 18th, 2022, 6:36 am Post #22 - June 18th, 2022, 6:36 am
    I swore that I would never have electric burners. After using induction burners at my daughters' house, I grudgingly admitted that I could live with them. I agree with Ronnie, that electric ovens are superior in all respects to any gas oven that I have tried.

Contact

About

Team

Advertize

Close

Chat

Articles

Guide

Events

more