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Knife Sharpening
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  • Knife Sharpening

    Post #1 - December 2nd, 2004, 2:48 pm
    Post #1 - December 2nd, 2004, 2:48 pm Post #1 - December 2nd, 2004, 2:48 pm
    I need a little help. I have had my set of Wusthof knives for about 5 years and have had them sharpened about once a year (yeah, I know it should be more often, but a lot of our current funds are going towards buying diapers. Being would sharp knives is a lot more tolerable and better smelling than being without diapers). We just move back to Chicago from South Carolina and I do not know of a place, hopefully in the West Suburbs that does a good job at sharpening knives. We are looking for a place that restaurants would trust.

    When we lived in SC, I called Wusthof to see if the recommended anyone and they had a person in VA that did it, I would just send my knives and then get them back in 3-4 days. He did a great job, but I did not want to be without my tools that long now that wea re back in civilization.

    Thanks
  • Post #2 - December 2nd, 2004, 2:52 pm
    Post #2 - December 2nd, 2004, 2:52 pm Post #2 - December 2nd, 2004, 2:52 pm
    In forest park is Bagat Bros. Sharp Knife Service, which is fine, and he does a big restaurant trade.

    I take my wusthof knives to Northwestern Cutlery to be sharpened, and they sharpen the knives for many, many, many restaurants in the city.

    Bagat BROS Sharp Knife Service CO
    (708) 366-2818
    7621 Roosevelt Road
    Forest Park, IL
    60130

    Northwestern Cutlery Supply Inc
    (312) 421-3666
    810 West Lake St
    Chicago, IL 60607
    Ed Fisher
    my chicago food photos

    RIP LTH.
  • Post #3 - December 3rd, 2004, 10:24 am
    Post #3 - December 3rd, 2004, 10:24 am Post #3 - December 3rd, 2004, 10:24 am
    I second Northwest Cutlery. It's cheap - something like $3 a knife - and they do it while you wait. You'll be on the streets with sharp knives in minutes.

    rien
  • Post #4 - December 3rd, 2004, 12:24 pm
    Post #4 - December 3rd, 2004, 12:24 pm Post #4 - December 3rd, 2004, 12:24 pm
    I third it! But, be supercareful afterwards! I wasn't and ended up in the e-room with 11 stitches! :roll:
  • Post #5 - December 3rd, 2004, 12:38 pm
    Post #5 - December 3rd, 2004, 12:38 pm Post #5 - December 3rd, 2004, 12:38 pm
    Apple wrote:I third it! But, be supercareful afterwards! I wasn't and ended up in the e-room with 11 stitches! :roll:


    Sorry to hear that.

    [soapbox]
    Besides the fact that it is important to always be careful when using knives, it is important to note that a very sharp knife is much safer than a dull one.

    When chopping, slicing, dicing, whatever, with a less-than-sharp knife, the blade is much more likely to slide across, or slip off, the surface of the food you're cutting. A sharp knife moves smoothly and goes where you tell it to.

    Keep your knives sharp!

    I hone my knives with a steel before every use, and have them sharpened at NW Cutlery about once or twice a year, depending on the knife.
    [/soapbox]

    Best,
    EC
  • Post #6 - December 3rd, 2004, 2:38 pm
    Post #6 - December 3rd, 2004, 2:38 pm Post #6 - December 3rd, 2004, 2:38 pm
    A sharp knife cut also seems to heal quicker than one from a dull knife.It is a straight cut,not jagged.
  • Post #7 - December 3rd, 2004, 3:37 pm
    Post #7 - December 3rd, 2004, 3:37 pm Post #7 - December 3rd, 2004, 3:37 pm
    Reading about straight and jagged cuts, I can't help but flash back to the B/D/S/M conversation on another topic. There's some sort of undercurrent at work, forcing convergence.

    rien
  • Post #8 - December 3rd, 2004, 3:40 pm
    Post #8 - December 3rd, 2004, 3:40 pm Post #8 - December 3rd, 2004, 3:40 pm
    Good point but I actually wasn't thinking of that when I posted.This time!
  • Post #9 - December 3rd, 2004, 3:57 pm
    Post #9 - December 3rd, 2004, 3:57 pm Post #9 - December 3rd, 2004, 3:57 pm
    Hi,

    Some years ago, my Dad bought a manual rotary slicer like you see in butcher shops. I got rid of it after having a dream about my blithely slicing my thumb in half before realizing my mistake. I never used it plus it took up valuable counterspace.

    I agree a very sharp knife is an efficient tool. The problem is we often work with somewhat dull, which requires more personal effort for the same effect. You get used to overdoing it, then get into trouble when they are at peak sharpness again. I really do not have the tip of one thumb, which I lobbed off from such an experience. It took a long time to heal.

    I do have a stone to keep them sharp, which I use regularly. Storing them in a block, rather than knocking against each other, keeps them sharp longer. Handwashing over dishwasher cleaning keeps them in overall better condition, also.

    As a minimum, I have these knives: a long cerated bread knife, a boning knife, a french/chef's knife and some paring knives is all one really needs. I also have cleavers, one German, which I don't like, and a Chinese one which is fun to use and versatile; though neither is used very often. All the other odd knives I have (one just for cutting through frozen food!) came via gifts.
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
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  • Post #10 - December 3rd, 2004, 4:10 pm
    Post #10 - December 3rd, 2004, 4:10 pm Post #10 - December 3rd, 2004, 4:10 pm
    I just got this knife:

    http://www.leevalley.com/garden/page.as ... 0733,40738

    Very reasonably priced, super-sharp, easy to sharpen on a regular steel (or an Arkansas stone) - only downside is it discolors pretty easily. Doesn't affect performance, only aesthetics.
  • Post #11 - December 4th, 2004, 9:58 am
    Post #11 - December 4th, 2004, 9:58 am Post #11 - December 4th, 2004, 9:58 am
    KevinT wrote:We just move back to Chicago from South Carolina and I do not know of a place, hopefully in the West Suburbs that does a good job at sharpening knives. We are looking for a place that restaurants would trust.

    Kevin,

    No help on the West burbs, but I most definitely agree with Ed Fisher, aka Gleam, and Rien on Northwestern Cutlery.

    Northwestern uses the wheel/stone method and takes pride in their work. Northwestern carries a full line of knives, from inexpensive Dexter white handled sani-safe to the better known German and Japanese.

    If you ask, they are not on display, Northwestern may still have a few original carbon steel Sabatier's in the back, which are hard to find. Northwestern does not carry Misono and is slightly weak in upper end Japanese knives. No custom knives either.

    Northwestern has kitchen gadgets, accessories and cookware, including All-Clad, but, frankly, their prices are starting to creep up, still less than the majors, but not the amazing deals they were. A 'don't miss' at Northwestern is their bargain bins, the occasional amazing deal can be had.

    Northwestern Cutlery is just West of Halsted on Lake, be advised Lake is (was?) currently closed going West at Halsted.

    Coincidentally, I am going to Northwestern this morning to get a knife rebeveled. Seems some idiot (me) slightly twisted the knife while cutting through a turkey thigh bone and there is a small section missing. :oops:

    Enjoy,
    Gary

    Northwestern Cutlery
    810 West Lake St
    Chicago, IL 60607
    312-421-3666
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #12 - December 4th, 2004, 12:37 pm
    Post #12 - December 4th, 2004, 12:37 pm Post #12 - December 4th, 2004, 12:37 pm
    Another great thing about NWC for the home repair challenged--they'll do some small appliance work. I just had the fizzling cord on my coffee grinder replaced for ten bucks. Took just one day.
  • Post #13 - December 6th, 2004, 12:56 pm
    Post #13 - December 6th, 2004, 12:56 pm Post #13 - December 6th, 2004, 12:56 pm
    I highly recommend Maestranzi Sharp Knife. Most of their work is for restaurants but they'll glady sharpen your knive while you wait -- just don't go at lunch time! They've been in business over 100 years. They are located just southeast of Lawrence and Harlem. My only complaint is you don't get to see the sharpening take place -- though I've never asked.

    Maestranzi Sharp Knife
    4715 N Ronald
    Harwood Heights
    708-867-7323
  • Post #14 - April 20th, 2005, 2:22 pm
    Post #14 - April 20th, 2005, 2:22 pm Post #14 - April 20th, 2005, 2:22 pm
    There used to be a guy who came around to our block once every year in Evanston to sharpen knives. Now that I live in the city (Bucktown) I don't know where (or how) to get my kitchen knives sharpened.

    I welcome suggestions.
  • Post #15 - April 20th, 2005, 2:36 pm
  • Post #16 - April 20th, 2005, 2:40 pm
    Post #16 - April 20th, 2005, 2:40 pm Post #16 - April 20th, 2005, 2:40 pm
    Chicgail wrote:There used to be a guy who came around to our block once every year in Evanston to sharpen knives. Now that I live in the city (Bucktown) I don't know where (or how) to get my kitchen knives sharpened.

    I welcome suggestions.


    Northwest Cutlery
    312.421.7016
    810 W. Lake Street
    Chicago, IL
    Bruce
    Plenipotentiary
    bruce@bdbbq.com

    Raw meat should NOT have an ingredients list!!
  • Post #17 - April 20th, 2005, 4:09 pm
    Post #17 - April 20th, 2005, 4:09 pm Post #17 - April 20th, 2005, 4:09 pm
    Chicgail wrote:There used to be a guy who came around to our block once every year in Evanston to sharpen knives. Now that I live in the city (Bucktown) I don't know where (or how) to get my kitchen knives sharpened.

    I welcome suggestions.


    I still have that guy come around in my neighborhood once a year...usually right around Memorial Day. Two years ago, I stopped letting him sharpen my knives. His work has become subpar. I don't know if it's just burnout or if it's his advancing age. In any event, I now take my knives to Northwest.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #18 - April 21st, 2005, 6:55 am
    Post #18 - April 21st, 2005, 6:55 am Post #18 - April 21st, 2005, 6:55 am
    After posting a message last fall, I went to Northwestern Cutlery and they did a great job sharpening my Wusthof knives that had not been sharpened in 1-1/2 years. I would recommend them. On they way home, you can stop at Peoria Packing which is right down the street.
  • Post #19 - April 21st, 2005, 7:52 am
    Post #19 - April 21st, 2005, 7:52 am Post #19 - April 21st, 2005, 7:52 am
    If Northwestern Cutlery is a daunting hike, as it is for me, I understand that The Wooden Spoon in Andersonville sharpens knives. I haven't used their services but have heard satisfied reports from people who have.
  • Post #20 - April 27th, 2005, 4:04 pm
    Post #20 - April 27th, 2005, 4:04 pm Post #20 - April 27th, 2005, 4:04 pm
    I just called NWC, and they've got a new supply of the Sabatier carbon-steel knives in, in a number of styles.

    My all time favorite knife is a little three-brass-rivet Sabatier 4" carbon-steel utility knife that I bought at BHV in Paris in '84 for about $3 (of course, the exchange that yr was 10:1, which explains why I was in Paris: picking up my brand new half-price Peugeot 505!!)

    So I bought a 6" chef's knife, sight unseen, over the phone just now. Yee-hah!

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #21 - November 27th, 2005, 8:13 pm
    Post #21 - November 27th, 2005, 8:13 pm Post #21 - November 27th, 2005, 8:13 pm
    After reading some of the posts in this thread on knife sharpening I was surprised that nobody seems to be able to sharpen their knives theirselves. As fairly avid sportsman I have been sharpening everthing myself for years from fish hooks to kitchen knives. I learned this by reading a book by John Juranitch who authored the book "The Razor Edge Book of Sharpening". The web site is http://www.razoredgesystems.com
    Also it can be had at Amazon. I never did buy the book my self though, I just checked it out of the library and with a little practice I was off and running. Hopes this helps.
    harry
  • Post #22 - November 27th, 2005, 9:19 pm
    Post #22 - November 27th, 2005, 9:19 pm Post #22 - November 27th, 2005, 9:19 pm
    Harry wrote:After reading some of the posts in this thread on knife sharpening I was surprised that nobody seems to be able to sharpen their knives theirselves.


    Thanks to SushiGaijin's post I've been sharpening my Korin Gyutou and others.

    Occasionally threads seem to repeat, as gleam will attest
  • Post #23 - April 3rd, 2006, 7:30 pm
    Post #23 - April 3rd, 2006, 7:30 pm Post #23 - April 3rd, 2006, 7:30 pm
    I know there were posts last summer about getting your knives sharpened at the Green City Markets, but where can a girl get her set of knives sharpened pre-season? I live in Andersonville but am willing to schlep me and the knives if it's not too crazy of a distance.

    thanks in advance!

    bjt
    "eating is an agricultural act" wendell berry
  • Post #24 - April 3rd, 2006, 7:42 pm
    Post #24 - April 3rd, 2006, 7:42 pm Post #24 - April 3rd, 2006, 7:42 pm
    bjt wrote:but where can a girl get her set of knives sharpened pre-season?

    BJT,

    I highly recommend Northwestern Cutlery. Here's a past past knife sharpening thread.

    Enjoy,
    Gary

    Northwestern Cutlery
    (312) 421-3666
    810 West Lake St
    Chicago, IL 60607
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #25 - April 3rd, 2006, 9:00 pm
    Post #25 - April 3rd, 2006, 9:00 pm Post #25 - April 3rd, 2006, 9:00 pm
    bjt, chances are the Wooden Spoon is just a short walk for you. I don't know if knife sharpening's available whenever they're open, so you might want to call first.
  • Post #26 - April 4th, 2006, 9:52 am
    Post #26 - April 4th, 2006, 9:52 am Post #26 - April 4th, 2006, 9:52 am
    I'd also recommend Northwestern Cutlery...you'll regularly see restaurant professionals in their getting their knives sharpened, which speaks volumes, in my mind.

    One other suggestion: On weekends I've periodically seen a sign outside Sur la Table on North Ave. advertising free knife sharpening. I've never taken them up on it, and I'm not sure what kind of equipment they use (it's possible they're using one of those $100 appliances as a demo in an effort to sell you one). If they're using a really sharpening wheel (is that a whetstone?), presumably they'll take your money to sharpen your knives is they're not offering it for free.
  • Post #27 - April 4th, 2006, 10:17 am
    Post #27 - April 4th, 2006, 10:17 am Post #27 - April 4th, 2006, 10:17 am
    just out of curiousity, how long does a professionally sharpened knife keep its edge?
  • Post #28 - April 4th, 2006, 10:35 am
    Post #28 - April 4th, 2006, 10:35 am Post #28 - April 4th, 2006, 10:35 am
    Until you use it enough to dull it, basically.
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  • Post #29 - April 4th, 2006, 12:49 pm
    Post #29 - April 4th, 2006, 12:49 pm Post #29 - April 4th, 2006, 12:49 pm
    HI,

    Just after getting your knives professionally sharpened, be very careful how you use your knives. As the knives get dull, they don't cut as well. Intuitively you begin to add more muscle, which means the likelihood of cutting yourself increases. A few years ago, MAG cut herself badly enough on freshly sharpened knives to require stitches.

    Another usefull attribute to getting knives professionally sharpened, it rescues knives that might overwise get tossed. Like if you chipped the blade or knocked the point off or other travails.

    I also keep a stone at home for sharpening my blades in between servicing. I really should say I used to have a stone, because it has disapeered which means all my knives need fine tuning now.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
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  • Post #30 - April 4th, 2006, 2:49 pm
    Post #30 - April 4th, 2006, 2:49 pm Post #30 - April 4th, 2006, 2:49 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:Just after getting your knives professionally sharpened, be very careful how you use your knives.


    _____Yeah, and another useful tip (no pun intended...see story to follow), don't use a mandolin without a guard. Or at least pay attention and take it slow.
    _____Turning 3-0 last year was a milestone, no doubt, but cooking the meal for my family (I know that seems backwards considering it was my birthday, but that's how I roll) and slicing off the tip of my middle digit was no picnic. That puppy bled for half a day before I finally went to the local Prompt Care facility.
    _____Not exactly the best day to receive your long awaited present, a 10 piece set of Wüsthof knives. Very difficult to use 'em for the first month.

    ...still have a scar and humility. :wink:

    Z

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