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    Post #1 - October 28th, 2008, 8:52 pm
    Post #1 - October 28th, 2008, 8:52 pm Post #1 - October 28th, 2008, 8:52 pm
    This may sound odd but does anyone know where I can get fish heads in the city? Tensuke in Elk Grove Village has a great selection but I hate fighting traffic on the weekends to get there. The wife loves them but I think there has to be a place closer that sells them.
    Sal G
    Chi cerca trova.
  • Post #2 - October 28th, 2008, 9:20 pm
    Post #2 - October 28th, 2008, 9:20 pm Post #2 - October 28th, 2008, 9:20 pm
    Isaacson and Stein on Fulton St has them. You might also call Dirks on Clubourn to see what they could arrange. I am sure there are others. H-Mart in Niles, but that's not saving you a drive. Maybe in Chinatown?
  • Post #3 - October 29th, 2008, 3:28 pm
    Post #3 - October 29th, 2008, 3:28 pm Post #3 - October 29th, 2008, 3:28 pm
    There is an old school kosher fish monger on Devon, who certainly would have heads. Cannot think of the name right now though, but I am sure someone on the board will come up with it.
    Butter
  • Post #4 - October 29th, 2008, 4:50 pm
    Post #4 - October 29th, 2008, 4:50 pm Post #4 - October 29th, 2008, 4:50 pm
    How are you preparing the fish heads? Just curious...
  • Post #5 - October 29th, 2008, 5:45 pm
    Post #5 - October 29th, 2008, 5:45 pm Post #5 - October 29th, 2008, 5:45 pm
    Remember, if you take them out to see a movie, you won't have to pay to get them in.
    I used to think the brain was the most important part of the body. Then I realized who was telling me that.
  • Post #6 - October 29th, 2008, 7:48 pm
    Post #6 - October 29th, 2008, 7:48 pm Post #6 - October 29th, 2008, 7:48 pm
    She likes to make soup out of them or poaches them. Either way she like the meet that's on the cheeks. She says it's the best part of the fish.
    Sal G
    Chi cerca trova.
  • Post #7 - October 30th, 2008, 5:28 am
    Post #7 - October 30th, 2008, 5:28 am Post #7 - October 30th, 2008, 5:28 am
    butter674 wrote:There is an old school kosher fish monger on Devon, who certainly would have heads. Cannot think of the name right now though, but I am sure someone on the board will come up with it.

    Good Morgan

    Good Morgan Kosher Fish Market
    2948 W Devon
    Chicago, IL 60659
    773-764-8115
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #8 - October 30th, 2008, 7:19 am
    Post #8 - October 30th, 2008, 7:19 am Post #8 - October 30th, 2008, 7:19 am
    Yup, that is it. Thanks G Wiv!
    Butter
  • Post #9 - October 30th, 2008, 10:55 pm
    Post #9 - October 30th, 2008, 10:55 pm Post #9 - October 30th, 2008, 10:55 pm
    Octarine wrote:Remember, if you take them out to see a movie, you won't have to pay to get them in.


    Praise JuJu that I was not the only one who thought this.
  • Post #10 - December 30th, 2020, 3:19 pm
    Post #10 - December 30th, 2020, 3:19 pm Post #10 - December 30th, 2020, 3:19 pm
    Hi,

    At the new 88 Market on Jefferson Street, they offer a range of fish. They also sell Salmon fish heads and frames for 99 cents a pound. When I saw this a few weeks ago, I suppressed my impulse to buy until I had a plan what do to with it.

    I found on seriouseats.com two promising recipes:
    - Fish head soup
    - Thai fish head curry

    I selected two fish heads weighing in at 3 lb 11 ounces. The fishmonger removed the gills and split the heads in half at my request. I had seen a video recently where Asian Carp were split in half with a bandsaw before processing. I thought splitting the head would be a good approach to processing my Salmon heads. I also took the gills home. I wasn't sure if I needed them, but did not want to learn later I could have used them. I did not use them.

    I went with the Thai recipe, because I just bought some Thai basil. I also found I had a tin of the It-Girl Thai curry paste from Maesri. How far ahead of the curve was I? Its best-buy date was from 2013! I opened to find it was perfectly fine and used it as the base. I used a medium sized Dutch oven to provide a snug fit for the fish heads. The rest of the process you can learn from the linked recipe.

    When it came time to serve lunch, I reheated some leftover Jasmine rice, set the bowls out and a bone plate. This is a meal you cannot wolf down, because sorting through the bones is part of the process. These bones are also quite entertaining with various shapes, functions and an array of teeth.

    My impulse to split the heads worked out well, because each half was a serving. For our small family of three, we could have easily used one salmon head. All the broth, eggplant and my addition of some Chinese broccoli provided a full meal with leftovers.

    Too bad none of my sisters were present, because this meal really needed a jolly round of fish heads!



    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #11 - December 31st, 2020, 7:24 am
    Post #11 - December 31st, 2020, 7:24 am Post #11 - December 31st, 2020, 7:24 am
    Years ago when my Finnish Mother in Law was alive, I would make her a Finnish Soup called Kalamojakka. Usually made it after fishing Lake Superior. We would filet the Lake Trout and Salmon and I would take the head and bones and make this soup. I loved having my wife and kids check out the eyeballs floating on top during the simmer. The soup was always greatly appreciated by my MIL.
  • Post #12 - December 31st, 2020, 10:21 am
    Post #12 - December 31st, 2020, 10:21 am Post #12 - December 31st, 2020, 10:21 am
    Fish heads are a crucial component of the broth in which gefilte fish cooks. The few times I've made it are the times I've actually sought them out.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #13 - December 31st, 2020, 10:35 am
    Post #13 - December 31st, 2020, 10:35 am Post #13 - December 31st, 2020, 10:35 am
    Puckjam wrote:Years ago when my Finnish Mother in Law was alive, I would make her a Finnish Soup called Kalamojakka. Usually made it after fishing Lake Superior. We would filet the Lake Trout and Salmon and I would take the head and bones and make this soup. I loved having my wife and kids check out the eyeballs floating on top during the simmer. The soup was always greatly appreciated by my MIL.

    Is this recipe about right?

    That was really nice gesture to make this for your MIL. I hope you liked it, too.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #14 - January 2nd, 2021, 8:34 am
    Post #14 - January 2nd, 2021, 8:34 am Post #14 - January 2nd, 2021, 8:34 am
    Pretty much. I used tarragon as opposed to dill though. She absolutely loved it as I was the only one to ever indulge her with this. After straining (including the eyeballs), you pick the meat off and bring it back into the pot later.
  • Post #15 - January 6th, 2021, 8:37 am
    Post #15 - January 6th, 2021, 8:37 am Post #15 - January 6th, 2021, 8:37 am
    Hi,

    I don't know how long this will work: I am using facebook as my image host.

    Image

    Now you get to see the Thai fish head curry in all its glory.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #16 - January 6th, 2021, 10:28 am
    Post #16 - January 6th, 2021, 10:28 am Post #16 - January 6th, 2021, 10:28 am
    Cathy2 wrote:Now you get to see the Thai fish head curry in all its glory.

    He's kinda cute!

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #17 - February 3rd, 2021, 9:06 pm
    Post #17 - February 3rd, 2021, 9:06 pm Post #17 - February 3rd, 2021, 9:06 pm
    Hi,

    At 88 Market, I bought several salmon frames and a large salmon head. This weighed almost five pounds, though the gills were removed and tossed.

    Lake Forest Library's cookbook club selection for February is New England Soup Factory. The book is no longer on Hoopla, I have reserved a copy. Meanwhile, on Amazon I flipped through some sample pages and recipes. One was for fish stock that I made and will freeze until I get the book.

    After the fish stock was made, I picked the head and frames for 20 ounces of fish. I made potted salmon with 12 ounces. I will make fish cakes from the remaining eight ounces. My Dad ate the skin and other stuff I thought might interest him. Nothing goes to waste around here.

    I liked the potted salmon much more than the salmon cakes. My Dad liked the cakes over the potted. I was still finding bones as we ate either one, but nobody swallowed any. I was ready with relatively new found solution to swallowed bones: eat some bread to knock them down.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    Image
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #18 - February 5th, 2021, 4:39 pm
    Post #18 - February 5th, 2021, 4:39 pm Post #18 - February 5th, 2021, 4:39 pm
    Hi,

    What do you do with nine cups of fish stock made from a salmon head and frames?

    I made a variant of Curried Shrimp and Rice with Okra | New England Soup Factory Cookbook. I drifted from the recipe due to ingredients available: no okra with no attempt to substitute, used brown sugar instead of honey, no peppers, and no cayenne (by choice).

    The recipe had shrimp cooking in the broth for 15-20 minutes before it came to the table. I had some large 15-20 shrimp, which I brined and split in half. These were added at the last minute and were gently cooked and not rubber they would otherwise would have been.

    My Dad was initially disappointed by how the shrimp were used. If it is not breaded and fried, or in a shrimp cocktail, he thinks it is a waste. He liked this soup or whatever you wish to call it. Thank you!

    I likened this soup to a Thai curry. This book is from 2007, I wonder if they would use Thai curry paste now and maybe some fish sauce. Just thinking out loud.

    I have three cups stock for another day. Yay!

    Image
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #19 - February 6th, 2021, 8:11 pm
    Post #19 - February 6th, 2021, 8:11 pm Post #19 - February 6th, 2021, 8:11 pm
    ^ that looks pretty good

    My wife makes a shrimp head soup (close enough) (including the rest of the shrimp) and we had it tonight. She isn't even sure what region of China it's from LOL. Probably northern though. Broth turns a nice red color from all the shrimp heads.

    If anyone is interested..basically:
    - Stir fry some garlic, scallion, and shrimp heads in a wok with some oil (could even be olive oil or peanut oil) on medium to high heat. Do it until the red from the shrimp heads comes out. You can even press the heads to get more red out.

    - Put in shredded radish and cook until radish starts to turn red, then mix in the shrimp bodies (we do it shell on but cut down the middle so you can easily peel while eating)

    - Add water and boil for 6 or so minutes.
    2019 Chicago Food Business License Issuances Map: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1AGfUU ... sp=sharing
  • Post #20 - February 6th, 2021, 10:06 pm
    Post #20 - February 6th, 2021, 10:06 pm Post #20 - February 6th, 2021, 10:06 pm
    marothisu wrote:^ that looks pretty good

    My wife makes a shrimp head soup (close enough) (including the rest of the shrimp) and we had it tonight. She isn't even sure what region of China it's from LOL. Probably northern though. Broth turns a nice red color from all the shrimp heads.

    If anyone is interested..basically:
    - Stir fry some garlic, scallion, and shrimp heads in a wok with some oil (could even be olive oil or peanut oil) on medium to high heat. Do it until the red from the shrimp heads comes out. You can even press the heads to get more red out.

    - Put in shredded radish and cook until radish starts to turn red, then mix in the shrimp bodies (we do it shell on but cut down the middle so you can easily peel while eating)

    - Add water and boil for 6 or so minutes.

    Do you keep the shrimp heads in the pot or remove them before continuing? Is this served like a broth as a starter for a meal or later in the meal?

    Thanks for adding a new head to this thread.

    Regards,
    CAthy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #21 - February 7th, 2021, 12:14 am
    Post #21 - February 7th, 2021, 12:14 am Post #21 - February 7th, 2021, 12:14 am
    Cathy2 wrote:
    marothisu wrote:^ that looks pretty good

    My wife makes a shrimp head soup (close enough) (including the rest of the shrimp) and we had it tonight. She isn't even sure what region of China it's from LOL. Probably northern though. Broth turns a nice red color from all the shrimp heads.

    If anyone is interested..basically:
    - Stir fry some garlic, scallion, and shrimp heads in a wok with some oil (could even be olive oil or peanut oil) on medium to high heat. Do it until the red from the shrimp heads comes out. You can even press the heads to get more red out.

    - Put in shredded radish and cook until radish starts to turn red, then mix in the shrimp bodies (we do it shell on but cut down the middle so you can easily peel while eating)

    - Add water and boil for 6 or so minutes.

    Do you keep the shrimp heads in the pot or remove them before continuing? Is this served like a broth as a starter for a meal or later in the meal?

    Thanks for adding a new head to this thread.

    Regards,
    CAthy2


    Keep it all in there - heads should be in at every step. When its served, the shrimp heads are all still in there. A lot of the flavor of the broth is from the heads. We basically eat it as a main course specifically but you could make smaller portions like a side for sure.
    2019 Chicago Food Business License Issuances Map: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1AGfUU ... sp=sharing

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