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    Post #1 - December 12th, 2004, 4:53 pm
    Post #1 - December 12th, 2004, 4:53 pm Post #1 - December 12th, 2004, 4:53 pm
    I would like to try cooking with flowers.Does anyone have local recommendations for supplies?I appreciate the help.TIA.
  • Post #2 - December 12th, 2004, 6:00 pm
    Post #2 - December 12th, 2004, 6:00 pm Post #2 - December 12th, 2004, 6:00 pm
    hattyn wrote:I would like to try cooking with flowers.Does anyone have local recommendations for supplies?I appreciate the help.TIA.


    Most of the time, I think flowers are used more as an edible garnish rather than something that's actually cooked.

    One exception would be squash blossoms, which are often stuffed and baked, or stuffed and battered then deep fried. Sometimes I see them at People's Market on Chicago, Ev, or at Marketplace on Oakton, Skokie. Another interesting exception is banana flowers, which I've seen at the latter on rare occasions.

    As a garnish or salad addition, I particularly like nasturtiums. Both the flowers and the leaves are edible, with a taste kinda like watercress. I've seen the flowers on occasion at People's Market. But I think a better option is to get a flower pot and stick some seeds in (might help if you used some potting soil too, and have a sunny window).

    Here's a reference that I like on edible flowers:

    http://whatscookingamerica.net/EdibleFl ... rsMain.htm

    and a good source for interesting seeds:

    http://www.seedsavers.org
  • Post #3 - December 12th, 2004, 8:31 pm
    Post #3 - December 12th, 2004, 8:31 pm Post #3 - December 12th, 2004, 8:31 pm
    HI,

    Today I was at a holiday luncheon with friends from Culinary Historians. The conversation drifted into edible flowers. One woman advised going to an affair where flowers were part of a dish presentation. She immediately recognized these were not in the list of known edible flowers; though maybe these were new to her. She asked the waiter to verify if these were indeed edible flowers. They advised there were not and immediately alerted those assembled not to eat the flowers. Edible flowers were intended but none were available, so someone ran out to buy anything floral to finish the plate. Several of us remarked if not forewarned, we would have simply eaten the flowers.

    Some years ago, Gourmet Magazine featured a wedding cake on their cover with fresh Lily of the Valley. Someone belatedly advised these are not edible flowers. There were press releases, letters and eventually a custom sticker to place over the errant advice in the magazine.

    Unless you really know what you are doing, then I offer the advice I offer eager mushroomers: when in doubt, don't.
    Last edited by Cathy2 on December 12th, 2004, 8:40 pm, edited 1 time in total.
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #4 - December 12th, 2004, 9:18 pm
    Post #4 - December 12th, 2004, 9:18 pm Post #4 - December 12th, 2004, 9:18 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:Some years ago, Gourmet Magazine featured a wedding cake on their cover with fresh Lily of the Valley. Someone belatedly advised these are not edible flowers. There were press releases, letters and eventually a custom sticker to place over the errant advice in the magazine.

    Unless you really know what you are doing, then I offer the advice I offer eager mushroomers: when in doubt, don't.


    Another reason to grow your own (but not lilies of the valley - just known edibles); especially if they're from organic seeds; it's not that tough.
    Last edited by nr706 on December 13th, 2004, 10:56 am, edited 1 time in total.
  • Post #5 - December 12th, 2004, 9:45 pm
    Post #5 - December 12th, 2004, 9:45 pm Post #5 - December 12th, 2004, 9:45 pm
    You can purchase edible flowers from the produce department at Whole Foods near Lincoln, Belmont & Ashland.
  • Post #6 - December 13th, 2004, 3:17 am
    Post #6 - December 13th, 2004, 3:17 am Post #6 - December 13th, 2004, 3:17 am
    .....doesn't matter if you grow your own, grow them organically, hydroponically,or whatever - they are highly, highly toxic, meaning both the leaves and the flowers. Stay away, other than for smelling purposes, and for the love of God, DON'T have little nosegays of them around the house in the spring if you have pets or kids! Quite the attractive nuisance...

    :twisted:
  • Post #7 - November 17th, 2014, 8:39 am
    Post #7 - November 17th, 2014, 8:39 am Post #7 - November 17th, 2014, 8:39 am
    Old, old topic, but has anyone seen mixed packages of edible flowers for sale in stores, preferably on the north side of the city? We're having a dinner party, and I thought a few edible flowers might be nice for one of the salad courses.
  • Post #8 - November 17th, 2014, 9:05 am
    Post #8 - November 17th, 2014, 9:05 am Post #8 - November 17th, 2014, 9:05 am
    I know I've seen them at Whole Foods but no idea if they still have them. Plum Market or Eataly might be options as well. Other than WF, can't think of any places on the north side. And I'd definitely call first.
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #9 - November 17th, 2014, 10:47 am
    Post #9 - November 17th, 2014, 10:47 am Post #9 - November 17th, 2014, 10:47 am
    Thanks. By the way, it was a salad from Maria Elia's excellent Greek cookbook, Smashing Plates, that sent me on the search.

    -rtb
  • Post #10 - November 17th, 2014, 1:55 pm
    Post #10 - November 17th, 2014, 1:55 pm Post #10 - November 17th, 2014, 1:55 pm
    boudreaulicious wrote:I know I've seen them at Whole Foods but no idea if they still have them. Plum Market or Eataly might be options as well. Other than WF, can't think of any places on the north side. And I'd definitely call first.

    I've seen them there too but it's a bit hit and miss . . . best to call around . . . the huge one (off North Avenue) may be your best bet.
  • Post #11 - July 12th, 2020, 8:56 pm
    Post #11 - July 12th, 2020, 8:56 pm Post #11 - July 12th, 2020, 8:56 pm
    Hi,

    Today's lunch was moo shu pork featuring orange Day Lilies from my side yard. Technically the recipes calls for the bud, I used instead yesterday's shriveled flowers. I wanted to enjoy a few more days of flowers, so using yesterday's flower was a minor sacrifice. Plus they tasted about the same, thus no real degradation.

    It only occurred to me two years ago to use the fresh buds from my yard. I had bought dried lily buds from Chinese markets to reconstitute. Many years ago, you could not obtain a fresh tree ear to save your life, now that is available fresh at Asian markets, too.

    Instead of Chinese pancakes, I used flour tortillas. There is only so much more time I want to devote to cooking lunch, so this seemed a sensible shortcut.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast

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