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What's your favorite type of chicken salad?

What's your favorite type of chicken salad?
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  • What's your favorite type of chicken salad?

    Post #1 - June 8th, 2004, 3:20 pm
    Post #1 - June 8th, 2004, 3:20 pm Post #1 - June 8th, 2004, 3:20 pm
    One of my favorite snacks to keep around the apartment is a dish of egg, tuna, or chicken salad. Occasionally, I will make pimento cheese, but usually just buy Price's. I've also done ham salad a few times, using your typical water cured ham scraps and also those from a genuine Smithfield as well. Some saltine crackers and I'm good to go. Must be my southern heritage and also the fact that at work, I'm surrounded by beef tenderloin, lamb rack and the like, and therefore crave more homestyle type dishes when away from work.

    I remember a thread on oyster roasts on the other board, under general topics, and a recipe for a sardine dip (to be eaten with ritz crackers) which a South Carolinian mentioned was mandatoryat such events. Gotta try this sometime. GWiv, are you listening?

    Although most recipes call for boiled or poached, I am convinced that roasted or baked gives better results.

    One of the Dallas suburban Boston Chicken (before they became Boston Market) stores had a really nice chicken salad. Large strips of freshly roasted bird, diced celery, plenty of mayo, salt and black pepper. I don't recommend what they are selling these days.

    A huge Dallas convention hotel where I spent many years (Loews Anatole) had a version with diced roasted white meat, celery, apple, split grapes, pecans, and then the mayo, s & p, which was really popular and a favorite of Mary Kay Ash. (My F & b director once asked me to cook, shell, and cut into small pieces a lobster, for her aging poodle. I refused . A sous chef had to do it).

    I remember doing a James Beard version quite a while ago which contained walnuts, celery, and tarragon, which was nice for a change.

    My mother did the good old southern version with mayo, celery, and sweet pickle relish, which could be enjoyed on soft white bread or toast at many dime and drug store fountains. I had this type last night on wonder bread.

    What's your favorite version?

    Evil Ronnie
  • Post #2 - June 8th, 2004, 5:13 pm
    Post #2 - June 8th, 2004, 5:13 pm Post #2 - June 8th, 2004, 5:13 pm
    I recently had two noteworthy chicken salads.

    the first was from Whole Foods on N. Ashland. It was called a Sonoma Chicken salad, or something similar and added nice purple seedless grapes and slivered almonds. Very tasty, large chunks of chicken breast and I think some poppy seeds for added texture. Just the right amount of mayonnaise to keep it together. I was shocked however to find that my wife had greenlighted this purchase at 10.99 (!) a pound. That makes future purchase probably cost-prohibitive.

    The other was a chicken salad salsa from Treasure Island. I'm not exactly certain what this orangish puree contained, but it was flat-out delicious. The texture was similar to a port-wine cheese spread with a few notches of spice and finely chopped/shredded chicken throughout. It is more of a cracker spread than a meal in itself, but I'm on the lookout for it again.

    the chicken salad I prefer to make at home has plenty of celery chunks and curry powder mixed into the mayonnaise. We're primarily white meat-only chicken salad people, but if you're using light mayo, I like some dark meat for extra flavoring (sort of negates the light mayo, I know).
  • Post #3 - June 8th, 2004, 5:49 pm
    Post #3 - June 8th, 2004, 5:49 pm Post #3 - June 8th, 2004, 5:49 pm
    Evil Ronnie wrote:One of the Dallas suburban Boston Chicken (before they became Boston Market) stores had a really nice chicken salad. Large strips of freshly roasted bird, diced celery, plenty of mayo, salt and black pepper. I don't recommend what they are selling these days.


    The key was the heavy mayo, the real stuff.

    Boston Market is not selling the chicken salad anymore (at least in the couple stores near Des Plaines).

    I like my chicken salad w/mayo, slight diced celery, black pepper.

    Sometimes I'll throw in some (or all) of the following: cashews, sliced grapes, curry powder.

    Put it in a wrap and man that is a good sandwich.
    I did absolutely nothing and it was everything I thought it could be.
  • Post #4 - June 8th, 2004, 10:43 pm
    Post #4 - June 8th, 2004, 10:43 pm Post #4 - June 8th, 2004, 10:43 pm
    I've used a recipe several times from the All Around the World Cookbook by Sheila Lukins (half of Silver Palate). Basically it's mayo and yogurt, some curry powder and mango chutney, peanuts, bits of tart apple and toasted coconut. Got some kick to it if you use a good curry powder, more robust than your average chicken salad.
  • Post #5 - June 9th, 2004, 12:22 am
    Post #5 - June 9th, 2004, 12:22 am Post #5 - June 9th, 2004, 12:22 am
    Evil Ronnie wrote:and a recipe for a sardine dip (to be eaten with ritz crackers) which a South Carolinian mentioned was mandatoryat such events. Gotta try this sometime. GWiv, are you listening?


    Evil,

    Here's the Sardine recipe I, as you guessed, saved, though I haven't made it yet. Let's add this to the menu when we get together for gravlax made from Copper River, cracker crumb fried shrimp, pimento cheese and pulled pork.

    I've been thinking about those shrimp ever since I heard your description of the recipe, I guess you just can't beat the combination of professional chef and native of the South. Speaking of combinations, where the heck did you ever come up with the idea of putting duck fat in your matzo balls?

    By the way, have you had Erik's pimento cheese? Erik makes a slightly adapted recipe from Saveur that's just excellent.

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    --

    Sardine Dip

    Sandy@gwm.sc.edu (Sandy)


    Sardine Dip is a traditional dip served at oyster roasts in the lowcountry area around Charleston. It is served with Ritz crackers. The practice is to eat the crackers and dip while the first batch of oysters is roasting, then eat as many oysters as you can, then return to the dip, then the oysters, then the dip, etc.

    The "recipe" is:

    Cans of sardines (in oil, as many as you need)
    Enough mayonnaise to make it of the proper consistency (It should be moderately stiff, to stay on the cracker while the eater wanders around with a beer, talking to others)
    Grated onion (to taste)
    Powdered mustard (to taste)
    Black Pepper (to taste)
    Salt (to taste, if needed)
    Tabasco (to taste, generally not too much)

    Mix the whole mess together, chill if made too far ahead of time, and serve with Ritz crackers.

    The proper wine to accompany this dish is ice-cold beer.

    The appearance (sort of grey, with little black flecks) sometimes puts newcomers off, but it's actually very good, if served under the proper circumstances - i.e., in semi-darkness around a roasting rig (outdoor brick grill with a heavy piece of sheetiron or boiler plate as the roasting surface), on a cool to cold night, plenty of oysters and beer and people. I've never seen it served with any kinds of crackers except Ritz - any attempts to get upscale or toney with this dish is doomed to failure, as well as well-deserved vengeance wreaked by the food gods.

    Leftover dip can be made into sandwiches, but after eating them exhalation will tend to attract cats and repel people.
  • Post #6 - June 9th, 2004, 7:57 am
    Post #6 - June 9th, 2004, 7:57 am Post #6 - June 9th, 2004, 7:57 am
    Hi,

    When Dominick's, pre Safeway's evisceration, used to have rotating samples at the Deli counter. One of my favorites was a Curried chicken salad with dried cranberries, though delicious it always needed a tad bit of salt. Lately, there is this presumption if they use enough spices they can reduce or eliminate salt. Sometimes a bit of salt rounds off the seasoning.

    It is roughly mayonaise, celery, some grated onion, curry powder, chopped walnuts, lime juice ... just googled where I found an recipe on the Ocean Spray website. Note I would likely increase the curry powder and salt & pepper to taste at the very least:

    http://www.oceanspray.com/recipes/recipes/sidedishes/CurriedCranberryChickenSalad.asp

    We rarely have leftover chicken in our house or when I do I am more likely to make pilaf. When I have leftover Turkey, then I will make soup, curry and a chicken-type salad.

    If one were to cook a chicken exclusively for making chicken salad, then would you poach or roast. My inclination for this end-use is to poach. What do you do?

    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #7 - June 9th, 2004, 9:07 am
    Post #7 - June 9th, 2004, 9:07 am Post #7 - June 9th, 2004, 9:07 am
    Cathy,

    I am more inclined to roast these days as the meat seems more flavorful than poached, minus the dividend of a nice stock.

    Evil
  • Post #8 - June 9th, 2004, 9:52 am
    Post #8 - June 9th, 2004, 9:52 am Post #8 - June 9th, 2004, 9:52 am
    I was never a fan of chicken salad till I had it from Casey's Market. Their version is a raspberry chicken salad, a little sweet but not overly so, with grapes and walnuts and other good stuff. They seem to use pretty quality chicken, too. I've never actually been to Casey's; my old roommate used to always bring the stuff home, but I'm considering a trip out to Western Springs just to get a couple pints of it.

    Casey's Market
    915 Burlington Avenue
    Western Springs, IL
  • Post #9 - June 9th, 2004, 9:52 am
    Post #9 - June 9th, 2004, 9:52 am Post #9 - June 9th, 2004, 9:52 am
    I second the recommendation of Whole Foods' Sonoma Chicken salad.
  • Post #10 - June 9th, 2004, 10:01 am
    Post #10 - June 9th, 2004, 10:01 am Post #10 - June 9th, 2004, 10:01 am
    Gary, another really simple low country recipe that you might enjoy is Low Country Crab Dip. The recipe became famous at the old Trawler restaurant in Charleston that was once very good, but has fallen on hard times over the years.

    It's a really simple recipe served with buttery Captains Wafers. When you visit a local seafood house, this would be a typical appetizer that your table might share while waiting on entrees to be delivered. It's addictive.

    1/4 cup Mayonnaise
    1/2 cup Cheddar cheese, grated
    1 cup Crabmeat
    1 tbl Horseradish
    Dash Worchestershire

    Instructions: Mix all ingredients and serve with Captains Wafers or other crackers of choice. For extra flavor, add more horseradish.
  • Post #11 - June 9th, 2004, 2:11 pm
    Post #11 - June 9th, 2004, 2:11 pm Post #11 - June 9th, 2004, 2:11 pm
    For the unusual... here's a complex Roast Chicken Salad recipe from today's NYT:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2004/06/09/dining/091NREX.html
  • Post #12 - June 11th, 2004, 1:36 pm
    Post #12 - June 11th, 2004, 1:36 pm Post #12 - June 11th, 2004, 1:36 pm
    thanks to jes for pointing out the new forum!

    of course, i had to chime in on the chicken salad thread. as jes knows, i am a salad girl at heart - i love to buy them, cook them, read about them....

    i am most fond of chicken salad, egg, potato, bean, macaroni, and the list goes on & on.

    just off the top of my head, i wanted to mention Swanson's Deli on 103rd St. down in west beverly. they do all the salads in your typical "basic" style, and they just do them very well. nothing earthshattering, but still good to taste good, straight-up versions of your favorites.

    ok, then i had to comment on the chicken salad i *just* had for lunch. i had to pick up a graduation gift & wandered down to field's. instead of going up to the 7th floor like i usually will on a loop lunch hour, i stayed downstairs and checked out the food court. thought about the sushi, but opted to graze over the salad counter.

    WOWSA - they've got TONS of stuff. i really wish they did a "trio" for the salads, but everything is done by weight. after checking out the many different chicken salads, i opted for the honey dijon version.

    very simple: large pieces of chicken, celery, little white onion, dijon and s&p.

    but, that with a fresh croissant & i know where i'll be heading real soon.

    miss ellen
  • Post #13 - June 11th, 2004, 9:19 pm
    Post #13 - June 11th, 2004, 9:19 pm Post #13 - June 11th, 2004, 9:19 pm
    Regarding Fields. I like several of their salads. Their fruit salad comes immediately to mind. The walnut room used to do a shrimp salad in those sweet little poatato nests with date nut bread and cream cheese finger sandwiches and a lovely strawberry and whipped cream. I was devestated when they stopped serving it.

    Regarding chicken salad. I make the traditional mayo and a little celery. Sometimes I throw in walnuts or almonds. I usually add grapes to mine, if it's not for a sandwich. Recently I didn't have any grapes and I threw in some dried cherries instead. It was good.
  • Post #14 - June 12th, 2004, 11:49 am
    Post #14 - June 12th, 2004, 11:49 am Post #14 - June 12th, 2004, 11:49 am
    I liked the Sonoma chicken salad from WF too. I've pretty much given up buying foods from their deli, though; it's just too frustrating.

    For homemade chicken salad, I like a vinaigrette recipe like the Nigella one posted upthread. If I'm going to make a mayo-based salad I usually use turkey breast. I quite often cook a boneless breast from WF just to have turkey meat for salads and sandwiches. My usual dressing is a mixture of mayo and Total greek yogurt, lemon juice, chopped scallions, sometimes with curry powder or an Asian spice mixture.
  • Post #15 - June 17th, 2004, 2:41 pm
    Post #15 - June 17th, 2004, 2:41 pm Post #15 - June 17th, 2004, 2:41 pm
    my favorite chicken salad recipe comes from one of my favorite artists-the late, great painter Milton Avery. its a great pleasure to know this is his. here it is: chicken(i'm a dark meat lover); mayo; cilantro; scallions; soy sauce; sesame seeds; black pepper; and dark sesame oil. this is all mixed to taste. i recommend adding the sesame oil last, as needed. this is wonderful, justjoan (AKA joan)
  • Post #16 - January 24th, 2020, 9:05 pm
    Post #16 - January 24th, 2020, 9:05 pm Post #16 - January 24th, 2020, 9:05 pm
    Leftover roast chicken made for a tasty curry chicken salad. Maybe a shade mayo heavy, curry is Vadouvan from The Spice House

    CCSP1.jpg Curry chicken salad
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #17 - January 25th, 2020, 5:53 pm
    Post #17 - January 25th, 2020, 5:53 pm Post #17 - January 25th, 2020, 5:53 pm
    I love their Vadouvan especially in chicken salad. And, I love chicken salad, though Zuni Kitchen's iconic rendition is the ultimate inverse of homemade mayo-y salads. My first time having a "curry"-based chicken salad was from a food truck in Marietta, OH in the early-90's. Grapes! "Curry!" Walnuts! In a pita!? What? That revelation of "outside the box" thinking cements a sense memory of that early Spring, sunlight pouring down so clear, a rushing river of beaming solar love, an actual river just across the parking lot where that lone food truck stood. My then boyfriend was the one who encouraged me to order it. To this day I love a good chicken salad, curried, or not. And, not too much shit mixed in, same with my tuna, my turkey salad(leftovers), egg salad.
    Being gauche rocks, stun the bourgeoisie
  • Post #18 - January 25th, 2020, 8:06 pm
    Post #18 - January 25th, 2020, 8:06 pm Post #18 - January 25th, 2020, 8:06 pm
    Leftover roast chicken breast, finely diced celery, ample salt and a little pepper, grapes if I'm cheery, raisins if phlegmatic, mayo to coat thoroughly then just a tiny bit more. I prefer some kind of squishy roll, iceberg lettuce for crunch (anything more frou frou than bibb lettuce -- never!).

    All IMHO :D
  • Post #19 - January 25th, 2020, 8:21 pm
    Post #19 - January 25th, 2020, 8:21 pm Post #19 - January 25th, 2020, 8:21 pm
    justjoan wrote:my favorite chicken salad recipe comes from one of my favorite artists-the late, great painter Milton Avery. its a great pleasure to know this is his. here it is: chicken(i'm a dark meat lover); mayo; cilantro; scallions; soy sauce; sesame seeds; black pepper; and dark sesame oil. this is all mixed to taste. i recommend adding the sesame oil last, as needed. this is wonderful, justjoan (AKA joan)


    This is so cool, I'm a big fan of Avery's paintings + as it turns out, his taste in chicken salad!

    I tinker with chix salad a lot and more often than not, lately, I do a Sichuan style that's got all the components of that recipe (plus Sichuan peppercorn, black vinegar, & chili oil) but sans mayo. But I'm on team mayo so I will have to give that a spin one of these days!
  • Post #20 - January 25th, 2020, 8:32 pm
    Post #20 - January 25th, 2020, 8:32 pm Post #20 - January 25th, 2020, 8:32 pm
    Christopher Gordon wrote:I love their Vadouvan especially in chicken salad. And, I love chicken salad, though Zuni Kitchen's iconic rendition is the ultimate inverse of homemade mayo-y salads.

    I adore Zuni Cafe Roast chicken with bread salad had it numerous times at Zuni, made my weak xerox homecooking copy a dozen times but would not characterize it as chicken salad. Unless that's what you meant by "ultimate inverse" and I'm simply slow. :)

    Christopher Gordon wrote:To this day I love a good chicken salad, curried, or not. And, not too much shit mixed in, same with my tuna, my turkey salad(leftovers), egg salad.
    Tuna salad I like on the stark side, chicken salad Lots of Stuff. The one pictured had toasted almonds, dried cranberry, grapes, red onion, celery, diced apple, s/p, hot pepper flakes and mayo mixed with olive oil, lemon juice, lemon zest, Vadouvan curry powder, s/p and a wee bit of crushed red pepper. Not pictured fresh pita toasted over the gas burner on the stove. A kitchen sink chicken salad. :)
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #21 - January 25th, 2020, 11:18 pm
    Post #21 - January 25th, 2020, 11:18 pm Post #21 - January 25th, 2020, 11:18 pm
    #1 is a ginger chicken salad with cashews from a cookbook called Turn It Up. Just mayo, scallions, cashews, lemon and a lot of ginger.

    Second would be curried with a Japanese curry powder
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #22 - January 26th, 2020, 10:20 am
    Post #22 - January 26th, 2020, 10:20 am Post #22 - January 26th, 2020, 10:20 am
    I was going to say Coronoation Chicken, but that's just another type of curry chicken salad.

    The simplicity of that ginger salad with cashews does speak to me, though.
  • Post #23 - January 27th, 2020, 12:22 pm
    Post #23 - January 27th, 2020, 12:22 pm Post #23 - January 27th, 2020, 12:22 pm
    I like nearly all chx salad as long as they omit white onion and celery.

    That being said my true all time favorite is Vietnamese goi ga. I can eat that every day.
  • Post #24 - January 27th, 2020, 1:13 pm
    Post #24 - January 27th, 2020, 1:13 pm Post #24 - January 27th, 2020, 1:13 pm
    Chix salad is one of my favorite foods! Whole Foods makes an awesome curried chicken salad and we try to recreate it using a recipe from the Colorado Cache Cookbook. It has chutney, currants and apples...YUM!

    Kaufman's makes a tasty and super basic CS. I think what I like most about theirs is that they process about a third of the chicken into fine shreds and mix that in with larger pieces which gives it a really nice consistency. I dont usually love super mayo-heavy CS though. Kaufmans is just on the cusp of this but the shredding of the chicken helps make it not too "mayoey" to me.
  • Post #25 - January 27th, 2020, 5:28 pm
    Post #25 - January 27th, 2020, 5:28 pm Post #25 - January 27th, 2020, 5:28 pm
    My current favorite chicken salad (curried) comes from Same Day Cafe in Logan Square. The menu online only lists "Slagel Farms chicken, almonds, dates" as the ingredients for their Curried Chicken Salad Sandwich, and I don't know if for the binder they use yogurt or mayo or both, but whatever it is, the chicken salad is absolutely delicious. Their egg salad is really good too, and though again the online menu doesn't list this as an option, you can get a selection of three sides or salads as a plate. So I often order that with the chicken and egg salads and a biscuit or another side. Or sometimes I indulge and just get both sandwiches on their lovely bread. So, so good.

    Same Day Cafe
    https://www.samedaycafe.com/
    2651 N. Kedzie Blvd.
    Chicago 60647
  • Post #26 - February 4th, 2020, 10:40 pm
    Post #26 - February 4th, 2020, 10:40 pm Post #26 - February 4th, 2020, 10:40 pm
    Not sure this counts, but back in the late 1980s Nibley's, a restaurant in Klamath Falls Oregon (it's not Hell, you can just see it from there) had a chicken, mandarin orange, rice salad that was amazing. Which I could figure out how to make it at home. I think it had some sliced almonds in it to. Mmmmm good.
    The thing about quotes on the internet is you can not confirm their validity. -- Abraham Lincoln
  • Post #27 - February 5th, 2020, 8:31 pm
    Post #27 - February 5th, 2020, 8:31 pm Post #27 - February 5th, 2020, 8:31 pm
    My all-time favorite is to have Chouxfly throw a few extra chicken thighs on the smoker after he's finished something else. A few days later, I'll chop it up with lots of mayo and veggies (celery, red bell pepper, avocado, corn), some lemon... and a spoonful of canned chipotle sauce. My mouth is watering just remembering it!
    “Assuredly it is a great accomplishment to be a novelist, but it is no mediocre glory to be a cook.” -- Alexandre Dumas

    "I give you Chicago. It is no London and Harvard. It is not Paris and buttermilk. It is American in every chitling and sparerib. It is alive from tail to snout." -- H.L. Mencken
  • Post #28 - February 12th, 2020, 11:03 am
    Post #28 - February 12th, 2020, 11:03 am Post #28 - February 12th, 2020, 11:03 am
    I like all white meat chicken salad. A plain one with onions and celery and seasonings and good mayo will do but I like the ones with apple, onion, celery, grapes, dried cherries, and pecans. Trader Joe's has a good wine country I think its called chicken salad when you can't make it in a pinch. Aldi also has a few chicken salads but I find them overly sweet but just ok.
    Toria

    "I like this place and willingly could waste my time in it" - As You Like It,
    W. Shakespeare
  • Post #29 - February 12th, 2020, 1:03 pm
    Post #29 - February 12th, 2020, 1:03 pm Post #29 - February 12th, 2020, 1:03 pm
    toria wrote:I like all white meat chicken salad. A plain one with onions and celery and seasonings and good mayo will do but I like the ones with apple, onion, celery, grapes, dried cherries, and pecans. Trader Joe's has a good wine country I think its called chicken salad when you can't make it in a pinch. Aldi also has a few chicken salads but I find them overly sweet but just ok.


    I actually do like the Aldi chicken salads even though they are sweeter than most. I cut the sweetness by using a strong dijon or horseradish mustard with them.

    Since the closest Aldi is five hours away in the Imperial Valley of California, I find myself making my own. I can generally get boneless skinless chicken breasts for $0.99 or less. I season them with my Joe's Stuff Seasoning https://store.nosoc.com/products/joes-stuff-creole-seasoning-blend and roast the breasts. Them I add in some celery seed, celery, minced onion, pimento, Claussen sweet pickle relish, and real mayonnaise. Occasionally, I will add nuts, raisins, cranberries, and the like.
  • Post #30 - February 13th, 2020, 1:40 pm
    Post #30 - February 13th, 2020, 1:40 pm Post #30 - February 13th, 2020, 1:40 pm
    During the Royal Wedding I made preparations to put together a proper English Tea for My Bride. Three courses; Scones, Savory then Sweet with accompanying teas.

    97DA5DE7-358C-4B47-AF4B-0B4905E5BB6A.jpeg

    The Chicken Salad Sandwiches were a big hit and we have been making it regularly ever since...

    Chicken Salad

    Whisk...
    1/4 c mayonnaise
    2 tbs each
    chopped shallot
    tarragon (1/3 tbs dried)
    2 tsp Dijon mustard
    1/4 tsp salt and 1/8 tsp pepper

    stir in 1 c shredded chicken

    Sandwich

    Dense white bread
    Trim the crusts and cut into 3 pieces
    Toasted

    chicken salad
    watercress
    sliced cornichons

    A Brownberry Bread worked well and the Jewel in River Forest actually had an English Foods section where I was able to get the cornichons.
    "Very good... but not my favorite." ~ Johnny Depp as Roux the Gypsy in Chocolat

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