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Who else made potato salad today?

Who else made potato salad today?
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  • Who else made potato salad today?

    Post #1 - May 25th, 2009, 4:01 pm
    Post #1 - May 25th, 2009, 4:01 pm Post #1 - May 25th, 2009, 4:01 pm
    I rarely make it or eat it, but there's just something about the Memorial Day, July 4th, and Labor Day holidays that wouldn't be the same without it. We like this version I found in a Bon Appetit magazine a few years ago w/ redskins, peas, and celery. Toss those ingredients with a good dose of white wine vinegar and then blend in a dressing of light mayo, minced garlic, chopped chives, Dijon mustard, and a generous sprinkle of cayenne.

    Image

    What kind did you make today? I'm up for trying something new for the 4th. :)
  • Post #2 - May 25th, 2009, 4:19 pm
    Post #2 - May 25th, 2009, 4:19 pm Post #2 - May 25th, 2009, 4:19 pm
    We had our party yesterday, but I, too, made potato salad. In response to the suggestion in another thread that one smoke the potatoes first, I used smoked redskins, and I combined them with hard-cooked eggs, bacon, and sliced green onions. For the sauce, I combined mayo, kefir, some of the bacon grease, dijon mustard, a dash of cayenne, and some smoked paprika. Turned out to be pretty darn tasty.
    "All great change in America begins at the dinner table." Ronald Reagan

    http://midwestmaize.wordpress.com
  • Post #3 - May 25th, 2009, 5:47 pm
    Post #3 - May 25th, 2009, 5:47 pm Post #3 - May 25th, 2009, 5:47 pm
    I didn't make potato salad today, but I like this recipe from Bon Appétit:

    http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/ ... tte-235835

    The only variation I make from the recipe is that, I either steam the fingerlings, or roast them at 350° with a splash of white wine, olive oil, salt and pepper, for about 40 minutes. I don't like to dry roast fingerlings; the result too often tough, shriveled things.
  • Post #4 - May 25th, 2009, 8:28 pm
    Post #4 - May 25th, 2009, 8:28 pm Post #4 - May 25th, 2009, 8:28 pm
    Try it with purple potatoes--peeled or unpeeled, almost any recipe. I did one with lime juice, hard boiled egg, celery, green onions and parsley. I thought the yellow of the eggs and the parsley and green onion tops looked good against the potatoes.
  • Post #5 - May 25th, 2009, 8:50 pm
    Post #5 - May 25th, 2009, 8:50 pm Post #5 - May 25th, 2009, 8:50 pm
    Hi,

    I make potato salad every few weeks, because it seems to be the best way to keep potatoes circulating. I will make them with whatever potato happens to be on hand. Lately it has been Idaho potatoes, which are not always favored for potato salad. I will occasionally overcook them, where they may be better suited for mashed potatoes. I find if I let them cool, they often firm up. I just have to catch it before the skin becomes a nuisance to strip off.

    I start with a vinaigrette with the vinegar varying from on what I grab first and often with Dijon mustard. I mix the potatoes into it and let it steep, while I prepare other ingredients. This week I added a lot of sliced green onions, minced white onion, often have shallot, too, but not today, chopped egg, chopped parsley and whatever else strikes my fancy. I then add just enough mayonnaise to coat and bind the salad together. I will then salt, pepper and maybe some rice vinegar to taste.

    I did make a buttermilk coleslaw from Cook's Illustrated that isn't doing much for me. I have come to prefer sweet-sour coleslaws. I will eat creamy, but it is not preferred. I thought buttermilk would be a nice change of pace, but I guess not.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways,
  • Post #6 - May 25th, 2009, 9:01 pm
    Post #6 - May 25th, 2009, 9:01 pm Post #6 - May 25th, 2009, 9:01 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:I have come to prefer sweet-sour coleslaws. I will eat creamy, but it is not preferred.

    C2,

    I was fairly well stuck on my version of Danny G's slaw, but lately I've been digging Lexington Red Slaw. Both slaws are in Low & Slow

    Lexington Red Slaw

    SERVES 8 TO 10

    1⁄3 cup vegetable oil
    1⁄4 cup ketchup
    3 tablespoons cider vinegar
    1 tablespoon sugar
    1 1⁄2 teaspoons celery seeds
    1 medium green cabbage, quartered, cored, and thinly sliced (about 8 cups)
    3 large carrots, peeled and grated (about 1 1⁄2 cups)
    Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

    Whisk the oil, ketchup, vinegar, sugar, and celery seeds in a large bowl.
    Toss with the cabbage and carrot.
    Season with salt and pepper.
    Cover and chill in the refrigerator at least 2 hours, but no more than 6 hours, before serving.

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #7 - May 25th, 2009, 9:05 pm
    Post #7 - May 25th, 2009, 9:05 pm Post #7 - May 25th, 2009, 9:05 pm
    Gary,

    Thanks for the tip. I will give it a shot once we past the buttermilk batch.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways,
  • Post #8 - June 5th, 2009, 9:10 pm
    Post #8 - June 5th, 2009, 9:10 pm Post #8 - June 5th, 2009, 9:10 pm
    Hi,

    The last two potato salads have been made with vinaigrette made with sushi rice vinegar. I used a vinegar oil ratio of roughly 2:3 because sushi vinegar has less acid and sweeter. I did not add any mayo to finish.

    This evening I roasted four red peppers, then chopped them up to add to the potato salad.

    I also cooked extra eggs for egg salad. I cooked them with the potatoes in my favored one-pot method:

    I fill my Dutch oven with one to two layers of potatoes. If I need eggs just for the salad, I will tuck several eggs amongst the potatoes. If I also want egg salad, then the top layer will be all eggs.

    I fill the pot with water to above the top layer, then heat the water to a boil. Once it has reached a boil, I lower the heat to a medium simmer and set the timer for 18 minutes. Once the timer goes off, I remove the eggs and chill them asap. I bring the water to a boil to cook until the potatoes finish.

    Lately, I have been using medium sized red potatoes that are almost done by the time the eggs are cooked.

    I like this method largely because I have only one pot to watch as well as clean.

    I found since I adopted this method, I make potato salad much more often.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways,
  • Post #9 - June 5th, 2009, 9:16 pm
    Post #9 - June 5th, 2009, 9:16 pm Post #9 - June 5th, 2009, 9:16 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:Hi,

    The last two potato salads have been made with vinaigrette made with sushi rice vinegar. I used a vinegar oil ration of roughly 2:3 because sushi vinegar has less acid and sweeter. I did not add any mayo to finish.

    This evening I roasted four red peppers, then chopped them up to add to the potato salad.

    I also cooked extra eggs for egg salad. I cooked them with the potatoes in my favored one-pot method:

    I fill my Dutch oven with one to two layers of potatoes. If I need eggs just for the salad, I will tuck several eggs amongst the potatoes. If I also want egg salad, then the top layer will be all eggs.

    I fill the pot with water to above the top layer, then heat the water to a boil. Once it has reached a boil, I lower the heat to a medium simmer and set the timer for 18 minutes. Once the timer goes off, I remove the eggs and chill them asap. I bring the water to a boil to cook until the potatoes finish.

    Lately, I have been using medium sized red potatoes that are almost done by the time the eggs are cooked.

    I like this method largely because I have only one pot to watch as well as clean.

    I found since I adopted this method, I make potato salad much more often.

    Regards,


    What a good idea, Cathy! I typically boil a couple of pounds of potatoes and a dozen eggs each Sunday for use throughout the week, but I could see this being very useful if I skipped my Sunday chores & needed a batch of each!
    "Baseball is like church. Many attend. Few understand." Leo Durocher
  • Post #10 - June 6th, 2009, 12:38 pm
    Post #10 - June 6th, 2009, 12:38 pm Post #10 - June 6th, 2009, 12:38 pm
    Making Southwestern Potato salad today. Not sure where I got the recipe, but it's a good one.

    Southwestern Potato Salad

    1/2 cup buttermilk
    1/2 cup mayo
    1 TBS Fresh lime juice
    1 1/2 tsp ground cumin
    1/4 tsp cayenne pepper

    2lbs small white-skinned potatoes

    1 cup cooked corn kernels (about 1 ear)
    1/2 cup chopped sweet onion
    1 14oz can hearts of palm, drained, rinsed, cut crosswise into 1/3 inch thick rounds
    2 plum tomatoes, seeded diced
    1/2 cup cilantro
    1 avocado peeled and chopped

    Whisk buttermilk, mayo, lime cumin and cayenne together.

    Cook potatoes until tender, drain and cool

    Cut potatoes into 1/2 inch cubes, place in large bowl and add corn, onion, hearts of palm
    Tomatoes and cilantro. Drizzle dressing over and toss to coat. Season with salt.
    Can be made up to 4 hours ahead. Cover and refrigerate.
    Gently stir in avocado just before serving.
  • Post #11 - April 2nd, 2011, 3:04 pm
    Post #11 - April 2nd, 2011, 3:04 pm Post #11 - April 2nd, 2011, 3:04 pm
    It's getting warm out and I'm feeling Springy – so hit me with your potato salad recipes!
    I'm primarily interested in the mayonnaise type but of you're got a killer German (or other ) PS recipe throw it out here – bragging encouraged.
  • Post #12 - April 2nd, 2011, 4:43 pm
    Post #12 - April 2nd, 2011, 4:43 pm Post #12 - April 2nd, 2011, 4:43 pm
    I am a potato salad purist. No peppers, corn, mustard, vinegar (except in a German-style version), or god forbid, relish. In other words, I like it to be very creamy with no hits of acid. Probably because I was raised with it, I'm partial to my grandmother's recipe, which is:

    2.5 lbs potatoes
    6 eggs, hardboiled
    1/4 lg. yellow onion, minced fine (you may want to use less)
    2-3 stalks celery, finely chopped
    Hellman's mayonnaise
    salt, pepper to taste
    Sweet Hungarian paprika, for garnish

    If using russets (like she did), boil whole with skin on until tender, then peel when warm to touch. If using boiling potatoes (like I do), peel, then boil until tender. Chop into 1-1/2 inch pieces. Chop 5 eggs into 1/4 inch pieces (I run them through a slicer two ways). Run 6th egg through slicer once, but reserve for garnish. Fold eggs into potatoes, along with chopped eggs, celery, onion, and mayonnaise to taste (about 1/4 jar). Check for salt and pepper, you'll need pepper, but probably not salt. Put into nice bowl, and lay egg slices over top. Sprinkle with paprika.

    Just as soon as I've declared myself a purist, I'll go ahead and contradict myself to say that the one "non-traditional" potato salad I really enjoy during corn season is this recipe, which has toasted corn and a buttermilk dressing:

    http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/ ... sing-10522
    Last edited by aschie30 on April 2nd, 2011, 4:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.
  • Post #13 - April 2nd, 2011, 4:51 pm
    Post #13 - April 2nd, 2011, 4:51 pm Post #13 - April 2nd, 2011, 4:51 pm
    zoid wrote:It's getting warm out and I'm feeling Springy – so hit me with your potato salad recipes!
    I'm primarily interested in the mayonnaise type but of you're got a killer German (or other ) PS recipe throw it out here – bragging encouraged.



    Boil potatoes (yukon golds)
    chpped celery
    non-fat plain yogurt
    whole grain coarse mustard

    Mix the mustard and yogurt and the toss with the potatoes and celery.
    Add salt and white pepper to taste.
  • Post #14 - April 2nd, 2011, 8:47 pm
    Post #14 - April 2nd, 2011, 8:47 pm Post #14 - April 2nd, 2011, 8:47 pm
    The Gourmet Cookbook's "Old-Fashioned Potato Salad" has become my and my extended family's favorite, and I've tried a lot of potato salad recipes. This one's a keeper. The key is to toss the warm potato pieces in vinegar.

    Adapted from The Gourmet Cookbook (Reichl)

    2 lbs. boiling potatoes - I like Yukons or other yellow potatoes
    3 tablespoons cider vinegar
    1 teaspoon salt
    3/4 cup chopped celery
    1/2 cup chopped white onion
    3 hard-boiled eggs, chopped (Boil an extra egg to cut into wedges to decorate the top at the end if you like)
    1 cup mayonnaise (Hellman's)
    pepper to taste

    Boil potatoes in their jackets and allow to cool enough to handle. In a large bowl, whisk vinegar and salt together until salt dissolves. Peel potatoes and cut into one-inch pieces, dropping pieces in vinegar as you go. Toss very gently. Allow to cool. Add remaining ingredients and toss again. Season to taste with pepper and additional salt if needed. I like to let it sit about an hour before eating at room temperature or chilled.
  • Post #15 - April 3rd, 2011, 9:22 am
    Post #15 - April 3rd, 2011, 9:22 am Post #15 - April 3rd, 2011, 9:22 am
    Hi,

    There are several other potato salad threads to look over.

    I make potato salad every few weeks, because family likes it and it is a repository of vegetable odds and ends.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways,
  • Post #16 - April 3rd, 2011, 8:13 pm
    Post #16 - April 3rd, 2011, 8:13 pm Post #16 - April 3rd, 2011, 8:13 pm
    I really like a dill/sour cream type potato salad. I can't stand mayo, so this is what I make.
    -red skinned potatoes, leave skin on
    -sour cream, or 1/2 greek yogurt 1/2 sour cream
    -celery
    -onion (green onions work too)
    -fresh dill

    There is a salad that is similar at Genes which I adore that also has radishes in it. I think I will add radishes to my next batch!
  • Post #17 - April 4th, 2011, 11:33 am
    Post #17 - April 4th, 2011, 11:33 am Post #17 - April 4th, 2011, 11:33 am
    emdub wrote:I really like a dill/sour cream type potato salad. I can't stand mayo, so this is what I make.
    -red skinned potatoes, leave skin on
    -sour cream, or 1/2 greek yogurt 1/2 sour cream
    -celery
    -onion (green onions work too)
    -fresh dill

    There is a salad that is similar at Genes which I adore that also has radishes in it. I think I will add radishes to my next batch!

    I've made this with new potatoes, and it's excellent. If you use radishes, try salting the thin slices first for about 20-30 minutes first. I just made a radish salad that way with sour cream and green onion. Radishes mean spring is here.
  • Post #18 - May 12th, 2011, 9:19 am
    Post #18 - May 12th, 2011, 9:19 am Post #18 - May 12th, 2011, 9:19 am
    Picnic weather is back again. I'm usually not a fan of mayo-heavy potato salads, but this more Mediterranean inspired blend is something I do regularly. I don't have any exact measurements because, well, it is potato salad. Mix it in a bowl and coat with the dressing. Letting it sit for 15 minutes before eating is a good idea.

    Salad:
    Mixed baby red, yellow, purple, fingerling potatoes; boiled, sliced in half
    Roasted red & yellow peppers, sliced into strips
    Grape/cherry tomatoes, sliced in half
    Kalamata olive, chopped coarsely
    Red onion, sliced very thinly
    Green onions, sliced thinly
    Basil and or parsley, roughly chopped
    Feta cheese, crumbled

    Dressing:
    Olive oil
    Red wine vinegar
    garlic, minced
    dijon mustard
    salt
    pepper
  • Post #19 - May 12th, 2011, 9:48 am
    Post #19 - May 12th, 2011, 9:48 am Post #19 - May 12th, 2011, 9:48 am
    jb-

    I'm not a mayo-based potato salad fan so the Mediterranean inspired one looks fantastic to me! Thanks for sharing.
    -Mary
  • Post #20 - May 16th, 2011, 12:28 pm
    Post #20 - May 16th, 2011, 12:28 pm Post #20 - May 16th, 2011, 12:28 pm
    Good ideas. I had a bag of yukon gold on my counter that was starting to sprout a bit. I cut off any offending sprout, cleaned them and cut into chunks and cooked. I did not peel. Drained and sprinkled with vinegar and dijon mustard. Now I am going to put in some mayo, onions and celery and seasonings. Its a good idea to make as Cathy says to keep the potatoes circulating. I am usually throwing some out.
    Toria

    "I like this place and willingly could waste my time in it" - As You Like It,
    W. Shakespeare
  • Post #21 - May 21st, 2011, 12:17 pm
    Post #21 - May 21st, 2011, 12:17 pm Post #21 - May 21st, 2011, 12:17 pm
    Frikadeller og kartoffelsalat på sydtysk måde med rødkål

    Image
    Danish or German style meatballs are extremely happily accompanied by a well composed potato salad. In Denmark and North Germany, the usual style of potato salad is cold and made with mayonnaise or crème fraiche or Schmand but the other day I had the proverbial 'Jones' for frikadeller but also for a South German style potato salad; put some red cabbage alongside those two items and you have one heck of a tasty meal...

    Image
    I didn't use any particular recipe for the potato salad, just winged it... ca. 600-700 gr. of Yukon golds, cut in chunks and cooked in salted water... While that was happening, I cooked till crisp one thick slice of high quality bacon in some olive oil. Once the bacon was crisp, I removed it, chopped it up and set it aside and in the fat remaining in the pan -- a combination of olive oil and rendered bacon grease -- I slowly cooked a chopped yellow onion. Once the potatoes were cooked (not overcooked!) and allowed to drain and dry out a bit without fully cooling down, I dressed them with the cooked onion and fat from the pan, the crispy chopped bacon, some chopped dill, a couple of spoons worth of apple cider vinegar and some salt and pepper and a final splash of an excellent olive oil (in this case, Portuguese).

    Image
    The frikadeller, a combination of pork and turkey, were done in the traditional way with regard to seasoning and cooking and they turned out very nicely.

    Image
    Det var helt lækkert...

    Velbekomme!

    Bon pro',
    Antonius

    Links to other recipes and cooking notes by this writer: http://lthforum.com/bb/viewtopic.php?p=55649#55649
    Alle Nerven exzitiert von dem gewürzten Wein -- Anwandlung von Todesahndungen -- Doppeltgänger --
    - aus dem Tagebuch E.T.A. Hoffmanns, 6. Januar 1804.
    ________
    Na sir is na seachain an cath.
  • Post #22 - May 21st, 2011, 5:48 pm
    Post #22 - May 21st, 2011, 5:48 pm Post #22 - May 21st, 2011, 5:48 pm
    Hi,

    I an American who is of German descent, which means I don't know as much about German food as I would like.

    I had not heard of Schmand. I looked it up to find someone suggesting pureeing cottage cheese, then folding in cream cheese. Just curious, what do you use? If you buy, where and what brand? If you make it, how?

    I have a feeling I could really like Schmand.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways,
  • Post #23 - May 22nd, 2011, 8:47 am
    Post #23 - May 22nd, 2011, 8:47 am Post #23 - May 22nd, 2011, 8:47 am
    Cathy,

    The word Schmand has some regional variation in what it denotes but the most widespread use denotes a reasonably high-fat sour cream (I've seen 20-30% indicated as the range) and so, when I feel like giving full expression to my inner-Teuton, I use a nice, heart-unhealthy brand of eastern European style sour cream — Russian smetana or Polish śmietana*... I don't have a specific brand that I always use; in fact, I don't know that I always come across the same brands when shopping in Polish stores or stores which cater to Russians... I also confess that for health reasons, I don't use Schmand as often or as liberally as I once did... And given that, my choice of product to purchase is sometimes determined by the size of the packaging... for us, more often than not, smaller is better... That said, there are a lot of traditional German dishes that demand its use and I have no intention of giving it up completely any time soon...

    A

    *Another German word for this product is Schmetten, which is used, I believe, in some of the eastern central part of the German language area, and was presumably borrowed from Czech (smetana). Schmand, on the other hand, looks like a good and old native German term.
    Alle Nerven exzitiert von dem gewürzten Wein -- Anwandlung von Todesahndungen -- Doppeltgänger --
    - aus dem Tagebuch E.T.A. Hoffmanns, 6. Januar 1804.
    ________
    Na sir is na seachain an cath.
  • Post #24 - May 22nd, 2011, 12:12 pm
    Post #24 - May 22nd, 2011, 12:12 pm Post #24 - May 22nd, 2011, 12:12 pm
    Hi Antonius,

    I just asked TODG about Schmand and she drew a blank. She lived in Aix-la-Chapelle
    [ :lol: ] for 8 yrs, but she somehow missed it.

    On a nearby point, we've been able to regularly find quark up here, stacked right alongside
    creme fraiche and other neat stuff. Who'da thunk?

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #25 - May 22nd, 2011, 1:20 pm
    Post #25 - May 22nd, 2011, 1:20 pm Post #25 - May 22nd, 2011, 1:20 pm
    Geo wrote:Hi Antonius,

    I just asked TODG about Schmand and she drew a blank. She lived in Aix-la-Chapelle
    [ :lol: ] for 8 yrs, but she somehow missed it.

    On a nearby point, we've been able to regularly find quark up here, stacked right alongside
    creme fraiche and other neat stuff. Who'da thunk?

    Geo


    Hey Geo,

    Ah, Aachen, home of Karl der Grosse... :wink: ... or should I say Aken... and Karel de Grote... :wink: :wink:

    Your comment got me to thinking about what the dialect map for Schmand, Sahne, usw. looks like and I remembered then that I actually have one in a book in my library here at home... It's kind of a strange map in some ways but in some ways, a lot of it makes good straightforward sense...

    As I suspected, the Schmetten form (with variants) is clearly from Czech as it appears only on the fringes of the Czech language area... Aachen and the lower Rhine goes along with the Low Countries (Dutch room) with Rahm... Schmand appears in two areas, one in the central west that extends to an area near Aachen (to the south) with the main body east of Köln (Hessen to Thuringia) but then also appears as the main form in my beloved but no longer existent East Prussia (whence my inclination to use that form)... the large Sahne area separates (actually, that should be 'separated') the two Schmand areas by a long way...

    Was bedeutet es für uns hier, daß der neue Bürgermeister 'Rahm' heißt?... If he had joined the army and attained the rank of Colonel, he would have been Obers(t) Rahm... :shock: ...

    I think we've talked about Quark on LTH before... in the 'old' days, when it was less widely available... great stuff... and nowadays available regularly at the Whole Foods stores in Chicago...

    A
    Alle Nerven exzitiert von dem gewürzten Wein -- Anwandlung von Todesahndungen -- Doppeltgänger --
    - aus dem Tagebuch E.T.A. Hoffmanns, 6. Januar 1804.
    ________
    Na sir is na seachain an cath.
  • Post #26 - May 22nd, 2011, 1:27 pm
    Post #26 - May 22nd, 2011, 1:27 pm Post #26 - May 22nd, 2011, 1:27 pm
    Ahhh, got it Antonius! Tnx for the dialect mapping, that's very kühl! :)

    I'm a Sahne guy meself: spent quite a few excellent years visiting a lovely woman in the Ruhrgebiet, which is Sahne country. And alles mit Schlag, but of course.

    Die Deutschen, nuh?!

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #27 - May 28th, 2011, 6:57 am
    Post #27 - May 28th, 2011, 6:57 am Post #27 - May 28th, 2011, 6:57 am
    Getting back to potato salad....any one favor putting yellow mustard in their potato salad? I used brown mustard last time but am thinking the yellow might add more zip.
    Toria

    "I like this place and willingly could waste my time in it" - As You Like It,
    W. Shakespeare
  • Post #28 - May 28th, 2011, 6:25 pm
    Post #28 - May 28th, 2011, 6:25 pm Post #28 - May 28th, 2011, 6:25 pm
    I adore almost any kind of potato salad, though I don't make it very often. But our family favorite is Indian -- basically, the inside of samosas, hold the fried wrapper.

    Potatoes
    Onions, slivered and fried
    Peas
    Cumin seeds
    Garam masala
    Coriander (dried)
    Cayenne (dried)
    Minced hot green pepper
    Lemon juice
    Fresh ginger
    Oil
    Cilantro
    Salt

    Fry onion in oil; add dry spices and heat briefly; add peas and a few Tbs water, cover and steam briefly; add cooked potatoes. Add cilantro and lemon to taste.

    Can be eaten hot or cold.

    Started doing this when we moved to a benighted place with few samosas available, and I needed to learn to make them at home to keep the children happy; I don't like deep frying and quickly realized that the filling was the essential part. (Well that and the cilantro and tamarind chutneys -- had to find another way to eat those.) Now back in Chicago, but still eating Indian potato salad.
  • Post #29 - July 4th, 2011, 5:43 pm
    Post #29 - July 4th, 2011, 5:43 pm Post #29 - July 4th, 2011, 5:43 pm
    Another Summer Holiday, another potato salad...

    Haven't made this one in awhile, but was reminded of how much we like it.

    "Tuscan" Style Potato Salad:

    Toss hot cooked cubed red potatoes with Parmesan, ricotta, chopped garlic, olive oil, cider vinegar, chopped parsley, and salt and pepper. Serve warm or room temp.

    Image
    DSCN0831 by MsLynnB, on Flickr
  • Post #30 - July 4th, 2011, 8:13 pm
    Post #30 - July 4th, 2011, 8:13 pm Post #30 - July 4th, 2011, 8:13 pm
    toria wrote:Getting back to potato salad....any one favor putting yellow mustard in their potato salad? I used brown mustard last time but am thinking the yellow might add more zip.


    Yes, but not American yellow mustard, I've used Coleman's English (yellow) mustard powder in this recipe

    http://www.deliaonline.com/recipes/type ... rette.html

    the mustard powder gives a nice kick to an otherwise too sweet dressing for my taste. Mustard powder can be a good addition to a mayo based dressing too.

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