LTH Home

Red Curry - Seebee Style

Red Curry - Seebee Style
  • Forum HomePost Reply BackTop
  • Red Curry - Seebee Style

    Post #1 - August 23rd, 2009, 10:07 am
    Post #1 - August 23rd, 2009, 10:07 am Post #1 - August 23rd, 2009, 10:07 am
    Love the coconut milk curry. Love it. In general, I find "red" my favorite at the Thai joints I've been to, so naturally, I had to try to make it better myself at home.

    Been making this for several years now, and I'm now confident I can beat anyplace's red curry in this city. I'm not a braggart, it's not my style. I'm just telling you that I can make a product that will knock your socks off, and it really ain't hard to do. I was a little tentative to try at first, but after doctoring up this and that, I can now say it really is a cinch. If you've never given it a try at home, don't delay any longer. A few tries and you'll get the hang, and then start tweakin it to what you want. Here's what works for me...

    Ducks/row
    Image

    More ducks. From left: about a tsp of lime leaf, a tbs of a volcanically hot jalapeno, and about 1/4 cup of leek.
    Image
    Normally I'd use onion, but the csa box had leek in it this week.

    The paste:
    Some sautee it in the coconut cream from the can, I use a mixture of veg oil, a splash of sesame oil and hot chili oil. 1/2 can of the maesri paste for 1 can of coconut milk. The rest of the paste goes into the freezer for use in a stir fry, or fried rice - perhaps as a base for a marinade for some bbq chicken... The paste gets sizzled for a few minutes here. Not browned, just sauteed to loosen up and release its flavors.
    Image

    After a few minutes, the leek, jalapeno, and lime leaf are added:
    Image

    This'll go for another few minutes for the leek, jalapeno to soften up. Once it's nice and soft - (again, not browned) Then the garlic, ginger, aleppo, galangal, chili garlic sauce, and toasted onion powder get tossed in:
    Image

    This'll go for another few minutes for the garlic/ginger to release their flavor into the fold. Looks like a gross party prop, doesn't it? At this point, your whole household should know what's for dinner, and if you have a good vent, your neighbors on each side, two houses away, will know you're cookin something good too:
    Image

    Next, a dotting of Oyster sauce. Unconventional? I don't care. Think about it. It's like reg vs decaf, diet vs real sugar. No contest if you ask me. It adds mouthfeel and beefs up the flavor. Not a lot - this is prolly a tbs and a half. This adds richness, and enhances the savoriness. Also at this point I'll add a few drops of ponzu, and lower sodium soy:
    Image

    After a few more min, in goes the coconut milk + the juice of half of a good lime and averything is mixed well. It's brought too a low, low, simmer while I'm prepping the chicken and chopping cilantro. This is done to meld flavors, and to reduce the curry a little bit. About two minutes:
    Image

    My first choice for this is thighs. I'll use breast if it's on super sale, but thighs are always better in my book. A lot of the recipes I see say to boil the chicken in the curry. If boiled chicken is your thing, then huzzah to you. I use a very slow simmer - like a poach. Chicken stays juicy. IMO, common sense prevails:
    Image


    I usually make this with seared mushrooms. They were too expensive yesterday, AND my csa box had a few nice zucchinis. A lot of recipies say to use various veggies like green/red peppers, and to also boil them along with the meat. I'm not a fan of boiled veggies for the most part, so I always prepare the veggies I plan on using seperately - normally a quick sear in a very hot pan, then I add them to the curry just before serving. I'd rather have crisp veggies. If boiled is your thing - then go with it:
    Image

    For something on the side, I like Trader Joe's "Coconut Curry" or "Lemongrass" Chicken Sticks. You toss em in the oven and a few min later, you have crunchy little deals for contrast to your curry. I didn't feel like running to the basement freezer for them, and also, I had half a bag of Trader Joe's mini chicken cilantro won tons in the freezer upstairs, and a hot pan from the zuchini. Problem solved:
    Image

    Plated:
    Image
    Tangy, savory, spicy, layered heat that pops at first, then mellows out to a nice warmth while you chew. If you stop eating, then it gets hotter. That's where the wontons com in. The rice and sauce is a fine meal in itself, the juicy chicken, and crunchy zuchini are almost like a bonus. And yes, that's the unmistakable essence of lime leaf in there. I'd sprinkle some slivers on the top, but I keep mine frozen, and it kinda changes the taste, IMO. It's more concentrated than fresh, and I think it overpowers too much after frozen to eat straight.

    Another thing. You'll note that no palm sugar was used. I think added sweetness ruins coconut milk curries. I much prefer them savory than sweet. And yes, like most stewy/curry/gravy dishes, it's even better the next day.

    Lunch is going to be great today. :D
    We cannot be friends if you do not know the difference between Mayo and Miracle Whip.
  • Post #2 - August 24th, 2009, 9:44 am
    Post #2 - August 24th, 2009, 9:44 am Post #2 - August 24th, 2009, 9:44 am
    Thanks for this post, seebee! I love curries and have been wanting to try to make one at home. Your description and photos make a very good primer.
    "Your swimming suit matches your eyes, you hold your nose before diving, loving you has made me bananas!"
  • Post #3 - August 24th, 2009, 10:29 am
    Post #3 - August 24th, 2009, 10:29 am Post #3 - August 24th, 2009, 10:29 am
    Katie - for Thai curries involving paste and coconut milk, It helped me to put it in the perspective of this:

    Almost everyone "doctors up" a jar of pasta sauce, or a can of baked beans. Same principle.

    For this Maesri Red Curry paste, I just re-introduce some fresh flavors (mostly garlic, ginger, onion, lime leaf, lime juice) to freshen it up. The results I get are better than most Thai places in Chicagoland (that I've been to) and guess what? The yield is far greater than a standard order at a restaurant (as you'd expect.)
    We cannot be friends if you do not know the difference between Mayo and Miracle Whip.
  • Post #4 - August 24th, 2009, 10:33 am
    Post #4 - August 24th, 2009, 10:33 am Post #4 - August 24th, 2009, 10:33 am
    Fantastic post! Good inspiration for dinner tonight. Thanks, seebee! --Joy
  • Post #5 - August 24th, 2009, 8:00 pm
    Post #5 - August 24th, 2009, 8:00 pm Post #5 - August 24th, 2009, 8:00 pm
    I could eat that soffrito with a spoon, and smile all the while my palate was burning to a cinder. Looks great.
  • Post #6 - August 24th, 2009, 8:19 pm
    Post #6 - August 24th, 2009, 8:19 pm Post #6 - August 24th, 2009, 8:19 pm
    Looks tasty, seebee! Looking forward to more recipes from you!
  • Post #7 - August 22nd, 2010, 9:42 am
    Post #7 - August 22nd, 2010, 9:42 am Post #7 - August 22nd, 2010, 9:42 am
    Curry makes a great weeknight meal. If I'm in a hurry, I use maesri curry paste. If I'm in less of a hurry, I augment the paste with a little chopped ginger or galanga (I keep some frozen), lemongrass, shallots, garlic, etc. pounded in a morter. If I have lots of time, I just make the paste. I feel like curry is so flexible, I never have two batches that are exactly the same.
    Here's a recent curry with 'augmented' paste (red curry with chicken, sweet potatoes, red onion topped with cashews and toasted coconut)

    Image
  • Post #8 - August 29th, 2011, 7:35 pm
    Post #8 - August 29th, 2011, 7:35 pm Post #8 - August 29th, 2011, 7:35 pm
    I made a sort of Semi-Ho red curry duck last night.

    The non-homemade part was half a roasted duck from Hong Kee on Argyle.

    Image

    I made the coconut milk and curry paste. I love my new mortar.

    Image

    Finished curry

    Image

    Image

    Served with Hitachino (got the idea from Next--goes great with Thai)

    Image
  • Post #9 - August 29th, 2011, 7:49 pm
    Post #9 - August 29th, 2011, 7:49 pm Post #9 - August 29th, 2011, 7:49 pm
    Interesting. where do you get lime leaf?
    Toria

    "I like this place and willingly could waste my time in it" - As You Like It,
    W. Shakespeare
  • Post #10 - August 30th, 2011, 6:15 am
    Post #10 - August 30th, 2011, 6:15 am Post #10 - August 30th, 2011, 6:15 am
    Nice post thaiobsessed. I love picking up roasted birds from Argyle to use in Thai recipes.
  • Post #11 - September 1st, 2011, 6:19 am
    Post #11 - September 1st, 2011, 6:19 am Post #11 - September 1st, 2011, 6:19 am
    toria wrote:Interesting. where do you get lime leaf?


    The leaves you can see in the picture are Thai basil (though I did put Kaffir lime leaves in there).
    I get the lime leaves (and the basil for that matter, when I'm running low in the garden) at Golden Pacific, though I'm working on a new source...

    Image

    AlekH wrote:Nice post thaiobsessed. I love picking up roasted birds from Argyle to use in Thai recipes.


    Thanks AlekH...This was a first for me (well, using the duck). I also noticed a sign for free range chickens at Hong Kee, though they didn't have them when I was there. I may pick one up to make a Thai chicken salad this weekend.

Contact

About

Team

Advertize

Close

Chat

Articles

Guide

Events

more