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Dry Aging Beef at Home

Dry Aging Beef at Home
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  • Dry Aging Beef at Home

    Post #1 - December 8th, 2004, 11:14 pm
    Post #1 - December 8th, 2004, 11:14 pm Post #1 - December 8th, 2004, 11:14 pm
    Aging Beef from University of Minnesota Extension

    Aging Beef from University of Missouri Extension
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #2 - December 9th, 2004, 8:52 am
    Post #2 - December 9th, 2004, 8:52 am Post #2 - December 9th, 2004, 8:52 am
    I guess we've gone a long way from slaughtering the animal and letting it hang in the barn for two weeksuntil you have time to can it ...
  • Post #3 - April 29th, 2006, 2:55 am
    Post #3 - April 29th, 2006, 2:55 am Post #3 - April 29th, 2006, 2:55 am
    Ask The Meatman: Dry aging beef at home
  • Post #4 - April 29th, 2006, 8:47 am
    Post #4 - April 29th, 2006, 8:47 am Post #4 - April 29th, 2006, 8:47 am
    Excellent! I was just having a conversation with a friend over the weekend--after devouring two giant porterhouses from the Madison farmers market, grilled (perfectly, if I do say so myself) medium rare--about aging. The farmer dry aged the meat 12 days, and the friend was wondering if you could dry age beef at home. I assumed it was a flat-out "no", but this guide cleared that up. Thanks!!
  • Post #5 - May 7th, 2009, 3:39 pm
    Post #5 - May 7th, 2009, 3:39 pm Post #5 - May 7th, 2009, 3:39 pm
    Howdy all,

    Is anyone here aging thier own beef/stakes? I would love to hear of your experiences and techniques.

    Stefan
  • Post #6 - May 8th, 2009, 10:50 am
    Post #6 - May 8th, 2009, 10:50 am Post #6 - May 8th, 2009, 10:50 am
    Hi,

    Cook's Illustrated described a method for drying aging beef at home, which I tried once. I never did it again, which may say volumes. I just wasn't convinced it was a better roast for the time spent.

    I learned from others here that a refrigerator in a remote location that is opened rarely is a better environment to do this. Using your refrigerator that opens and closes several times a day is substantially poorer environment to do this effort. This probably more than anything else kept me from attempting this again.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #7 - May 8th, 2009, 2:26 pm
    Post #7 - May 8th, 2009, 2:26 pm Post #7 - May 8th, 2009, 2:26 pm
    I swear I saw an episode of Good Eats where Alton Brown aged a roast in the fridge with a large tupperware container. It would be worth taking a look at that episode...
  • Post #8 - May 8th, 2009, 3:16 pm
    Post #8 - May 8th, 2009, 3:16 pm Post #8 - May 8th, 2009, 3:16 pm
    Jeffrey Steingarten has a chapter on his experiments with dry-aging beef in his refrigerator in It Must Have Been Something I Ate.
    "Your swimming suit matches your eyes, you hold your nose before diving, loving you has made me bananas!"
  • Post #9 - May 8th, 2009, 3:25 pm
    Post #9 - May 8th, 2009, 3:25 pm Post #9 - May 8th, 2009, 3:25 pm
    tyrus wrote:I swear I saw an episode of Good Eats where Alton Brown aged a roast in the fridge with a large tupperware container. It would be worth taking a look at that episode...

    I found this on Food Tv: Dry aged standing rib roast.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #10 - May 11th, 2009, 9:09 am
    Post #10 - May 11th, 2009, 9:09 am Post #10 - May 11th, 2009, 9:09 am
    Cathy2 wrote:
    tyrus wrote:I swear I saw an episode of Good Eats where Alton Brown aged a roast in the fridge with a large tupperware container. It would be worth taking a look at that episode...

    I found this on Food Tv: Dry aged standing rib roast.

    Regards,


    To add: http://www.goodeatsfanpage.com/GEFP/index.htm
    "It's not that I'm on commission, it's just I've sifted through a lot of stuff and it's not worth filling up on the bland when the extraordinary is within equidistant tasting distance." - David Lebovitz
  • Post #11 - January 31st, 2010, 1:45 pm
    Post #11 - January 31st, 2010, 1:45 pm Post #11 - January 31st, 2010, 1:45 pm
    The letters to the editor of Cook's Illustrated asks about dry aging beef at home this month. The answer suggests that the home cook can dry age individual steaks rather than whole strips or ribeyes in a fairly short period of time.

    1. Wrap prime beef steaks in cheesecloth.
    2. Place them in the back of the refrigerator, high up so that they are in the coldest spot in the fridge.
    3. Let them sit for no more than 4 days.

    The result, according to the magazine is a good drying of the fat that results in the intense flavors that one should expect for dry aged beef for am much higher price.

    I have a couple (one strip, one ribeye) in the fridge now. I should be able to test the method by Tuesday.
  • Post #12 - January 31st, 2010, 2:36 pm
    Post #12 - January 31st, 2010, 2:36 pm Post #12 - January 31st, 2010, 2:36 pm
    I saw this as well, and am looking forward to hearing your results. Sounds great but I'm a bit skeptical. You would get some moisture loss which should help the flavor, but I wonder if it would have time to get more tender. I hope it works great.

    Waiting Patiently,

    Jeff
  • Post #13 - January 31st, 2010, 3:23 pm
    Post #13 - January 31st, 2010, 3:23 pm Post #13 - January 31st, 2010, 3:23 pm
    I took a couple of photos with my IPhone. They're not of great quality. But, they may give you some idea of the method to my madness.

    I should note that I inadvertently referred to my steaks as prime grade. They are choice grade.

    The strip is a bit less than half a pound the ribeye is a two-pounder.

    Image
    The beginning product

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    Wrapped In Cheese Cloth

    Image
    In The Fridge For A Week of Vacation With Some Mexican Friends
  • Post #14 - February 1st, 2010, 10:57 am
    Post #14 - February 1st, 2010, 10:57 am Post #14 - February 1st, 2010, 10:57 am
    Hi,

    I have been dry aging steaks and primals for years with great success. Individual steaks really benefit from 4 to 7 days of aging. I have also aged standing rib roasts and boneless rib eye roasts for periods ranging from 10 days to 23 days.

    After 23 days of aging, a Prime boneless rib eye may be cut into large medallions, like a filet, that are as tender as a filet with wonderful flavor.

    Tim
  • Post #15 - February 1st, 2010, 11:41 am
    Post #15 - February 1st, 2010, 11:41 am Post #15 - February 1st, 2010, 11:41 am
    Tim, is there a time frame that you recommend based on weight. I was thinking 4 or 5 days for the half pound steak and up to 10 days for the two pounder.

    Any other tips you might have for us.
  • Post #16 - February 1st, 2010, 12:42 pm
    Post #16 - February 1st, 2010, 12:42 pm Post #16 - February 1st, 2010, 12:42 pm
    Am I correct in assuming that you won't need to do any trimming when doing individual steaks, as opposed to when much larger pieces of meat are done, due to the length of the age?

    Just a rinse and you should be good to go?
  • Post #17 - February 1st, 2010, 12:49 pm
    Post #17 - February 1st, 2010, 12:49 pm Post #17 - February 1st, 2010, 12:49 pm
    Will,

    I would age any steak up to two pounds for 4 to 6 days. Those are pretty thin steaks and you do not want the surface to dry too much; that would require trimming. Trimming is not desireable since you don't want your 2" thick steak to end up 1 1/2" thick.

    I would not wash any steak after dry aging. You may scrape the surface like your butcher does just to clean the meat.

    The longer aging periods are appropriate for a larger thicker cut with a fat cap. In this case, you may trim off dried out meat and fat.

    Tim
  • Post #18 - February 1st, 2010, 12:56 pm
    Post #18 - February 1st, 2010, 12:56 pm Post #18 - February 1st, 2010, 12:56 pm
    Thanks for the advice.
  • Post #19 - February 2nd, 2010, 9:56 am
    Post #19 - February 2nd, 2010, 9:56 am Post #19 - February 2nd, 2010, 9:56 am
    I opened the fridge this morning, now about 1/2 way through the dry aging process for the strip steak to be greeted by that nice mineral-like smell associated with dry aged beef. I'm planning to take the rib steak to a full 7 day age since it is considerably bigger.
  • Post #20 - February 3rd, 2010, 7:06 am
    Post #20 - February 3rd, 2010, 7:06 am Post #20 - February 3rd, 2010, 7:06 am
    I took the steaks out for a change of cheesecloth this morning. The small one is about 24 hours away from sampling. I'm planning to let the large rib steak go until Friday.

    This may all be for naught as I had an adjustment to my band this week and my ability to get certain things down is a little problematic right now. Steak is one of them.

    Here is the Wednesday morning picture update:

    Image
    Last edited by YourPalWill on February 4th, 2010, 8:30 pm, edited 1 time in total.
  • Post #21 - February 4th, 2010, 1:20 pm
    Post #21 - February 4th, 2010, 1:20 pm Post #21 - February 4th, 2010, 1:20 pm
    I can't wait to see your results and to read about your impressions on home dry-aging.

    I have a 3-4lb CAB ribeye roast dry-aging in my cooler for about 5 weeks now and a drybagged whole choice strip loin that's been in there for about 3 weeks. I'm trying to find a special occasion to try them out.

    Image

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    I just picked up a 14lb USDA Prime ribeye loin from Costco on Tuesday. I'm going to experiment with wet-aging it for a month and then drybag-aging it for a few weeks. Looking forward to some very tender steaks for the Easter holiday...

    Image
  • Post #22 - February 4th, 2010, 7:11 pm
    Post #22 - February 4th, 2010, 7:11 pm Post #22 - February 4th, 2010, 7:11 pm
    I was pleasantly surprised with the outcome of the little strip steak. I had been traveling on business today, so the total time in cold storage for this little steak was about 4 1/2 days.

    There wasn't a lot of fat on the steak from the beginning. If I do it again, I will choose a steak with a higher exterior fat content. I had to trim away a bit of meat around the edges as it has become too dry to try to cook and eat.

    Image

    I prefer a cooking method of pan searing on a bed of salt. It adds great flavor, creates a great crusty seal on the exterior of the steak and is pretty much fool proof for me. I didn't consider the effect that the reduced moisture content would have on cooking time, so the end product ended up clearly medium versus my preferred medium rare.

    Image

    The steak was very juicy and flavorful. It tasted much like a dry aged strip that one would get a a better steak house. The steak flavor was intense and it had a bit of the mineral flavor that longer aged steaks display.

    Image

    I imagine that this will be the beginning of more and greater experimentation on my part with dry aged beef.
  • Post #23 - February 4th, 2010, 7:49 pm
    Post #23 - February 4th, 2010, 7:49 pm Post #23 - February 4th, 2010, 7:49 pm
    That looks fantastic!

    Once you discover how easy it is to dry-age at home, you will never settle for non-aged meat again.
  • Post #24 - February 4th, 2010, 8:29 pm
    Post #24 - February 4th, 2010, 8:29 pm Post #24 - February 4th, 2010, 8:29 pm
    I would be very interested in hearing about your dry bagging method. I'm kind of a neophyte to this whole process.
  • Post #25 - February 4th, 2010, 10:11 pm
    Post #25 - February 4th, 2010, 10:11 pm Post #25 - February 4th, 2010, 10:11 pm
    here's a link to a rather long thread (from the wine and food board I read)
    http://dat.erobertparker.com/bboard/showthread.php?t=160097&highlight=dry+aged+steaks+experiment
    lots of good info
  • Post #26 - February 5th, 2010, 8:26 am
    Post #26 - February 5th, 2010, 8:26 am Post #26 - February 5th, 2010, 8:26 am
    Thanks for that link. It looks like 28 days is the optimum for a larger cut like the whole ribeyes or strips one can buy at Costco. Cathy's advice of having s special aging fridge (with a humidifier) is probably a good one.

    I'm wondering how one of those smaller dorm style fridges would work in this process.
  • Post #27 - February 5th, 2010, 8:48 am
    Post #27 - February 5th, 2010, 8:48 am Post #27 - February 5th, 2010, 8:48 am
    One new concern from the guy in TX who started that thread is that his Costco meat source is now using a tenderizer (needle punch) on the primal cuts so dry aging is
    not recommended. This does not seem to be the case for the IL Costcos that I've shop.
  • Post #28 - February 6th, 2010, 4:22 pm
    Post #28 - February 6th, 2010, 4:22 pm Post #28 - February 6th, 2010, 4:22 pm
    I decided to cut a steak from the 5-week dry-aging CAB ribeye that was taking up space in my mini-frig and make it to for dinner on Thursday. This steak from from the loin end of the ribeye. The meat was very tender and the beef flavor was very intense, to the point of being nutty. Anyway, I'll have to trim off a little more next time because part of the edge was certainly dry/chewy/tough when I ate it.

    Reverse-searing is my preferred method for cooking a steak. I roast the steak in a 250 degree oven until the internal temperature reaches approximately 90-95 degrees. Then I transfer it to a smoking hot cast-iron skillet. One to two minutes per side. (I did two minutes for this meal) Plate and tent with foil for 10 minutes.

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  • Post #29 - February 7th, 2010, 8:06 pm
    Post #29 - February 7th, 2010, 8:06 pm Post #29 - February 7th, 2010, 8:06 pm
    The refrigerator dried aged ribeye was the star of my Super Bowl dinner tonight. This particular steak had much more depth of flavor than the little strip that I cooked earlier in the week did. I served it with roasted green beans and a maytag blue mashed potato.

    The steak was big enough that I pan seared it on a bed of salt, then roasted it at 400 degrees for about 20 minutes. It camer out a nice rare side of medium rare.

    I should note that I took the rib steak out of the cheesecloth at six days and had stored it for the last couple in a zip lock type bag in my fridge.

    Image
  • Post #30 - February 7th, 2010, 10:59 pm
    Post #30 - February 7th, 2010, 10:59 pm Post #30 - February 7th, 2010, 10:59 pm
    YourPalWill wrote:
    I should note that I took the rib steak out of the cheesecloth at six days and had stored it for the last couple in a zip lock type bag in my fridge.


    Glad to hear it worked out for you. Did you store in a zip lock to buy a couple more days before cooking, or for some other reason?

    Thanks,

    Jeff

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