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In Search of Pickled Pork

In Search of Pickled Pork
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  • In Search of Pickled Pork

    Post #1 - February 5th, 2010, 10:42 am
    Post #1 - February 5th, 2010, 10:42 am Post #1 - February 5th, 2010, 10:42 am
    I finally decided to make red beans and rice for a Super Bowl party, but not with the 3-4 day lead time I need to make pickled pork called for in most of the recipes I've found.

    Anywhere to buy this in the area? I know there are other recipes which focus on smoked sausage, but I'd prefer the pickled meat if possible.

    I suppose I could just cut it smaller and amp up the brine? Any experience pickling pork?
  • Post #2 - February 5th, 2010, 10:48 am
    Post #2 - February 5th, 2010, 10:48 am Post #2 - February 5th, 2010, 10:48 am
    If you have a meat injector, or are willing to go get one, you could pickle pork reasonably well in 24 hours. I don't know what recipe you're talking about precisely, but it would certainly gain a cured/pickled flavor in that time if you poke it enough.
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  • Post #3 - February 5th, 2010, 10:53 am
    Post #3 - February 5th, 2010, 10:53 am Post #3 - February 5th, 2010, 10:53 am
    From Mike G's recent Supermercado Taquerias tour:

    Mexican Pickled Pigs Feet at Ricardo (image by Mike G)
    Image

    Taqueria Ricardo
    4429 W. Diversey
    Chicago

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
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  • Post #4 - February 5th, 2010, 11:08 am
    Post #4 - February 5th, 2010, 11:08 am Post #4 - February 5th, 2010, 11:08 am
    Brilliant, C2!

    I'm sure those feet would work, too. I use K-Paul's recipe and he doesn't call for pickled pork, he uses several smoked hocks instead. Seems to me that if you're looking for the pickled-ness, those feet would function perfectly: K-Paul's without the smoke, but with the pickle flavor. Plus all the additional goodness of the gelatin that feet/hocks give you.

    Geo
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  • Post #5 - February 5th, 2010, 11:35 am
    Post #5 - February 5th, 2010, 11:35 am Post #5 - February 5th, 2010, 11:35 am
    Geo,

    I'm glad you liked this idea, because I wasn't sure if it was really suitable. It was the only fresh pickled pig product I've seen lately that wasn't in a jar. Europeans pickle pork, too, though it usually ends up as headcheese.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #6 - February 5th, 2010, 12:52 pm
    Post #6 - February 5th, 2010, 12:52 pm Post #6 - February 5th, 2010, 12:52 pm
    LTH,

    This past summer, I saw pickled pork side meat (fatback) and tails at one of the butcher stalls in Baltimore's Lexington Market. It looked very similar to salt pork. Sort of like corned pork.

    Many years ago, I worked with a chef from Philadelphia who was reminiscing about cooking Philadelphia Pepper Pot back in the old days, and he said pickled pork was the one critical ingredient for that soup.

    Based on what I observed that afternoon in Baltimore and also gastro gnome's linked recipe, I would say that salt pork would make a reasonable substitute. Somehow, substituting pickled pigs feet seems wrong to me.

    :twisted:
    Last edited by Evil Ronnie on February 5th, 2010, 1:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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  • Post #7 - February 5th, 2010, 12:53 pm
    Post #7 - February 5th, 2010, 12:53 pm Post #7 - February 5th, 2010, 12:53 pm
    You can find barrels of pickled pork (including feet and tails) at African markets such as Old World Market (5129 N Broadway) and La Fruteria (8909 S Commercial). I'm not sure how it compares to the stuff you'd get in Louisiana but I wouldn't be surprised if pickled pork made its way into Creole cuisine by way of Africa.

    Here's an old picture from La Fruteria (upper) and a more recent one taken at Old World (lower).

    Image

    Image
  • Post #8 - December 29th, 2019, 6:21 pm
    Post #8 - December 29th, 2019, 6:21 pm Post #8 - December 29th, 2019, 6:21 pm
    Hi,

    I bought a few jars of pickled hocks, because I knew my Mom would comment, "Just what my Daddy loved!"

    Now I am thinking about how to use this. Any ideas?

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #9 - December 29th, 2019, 6:34 pm
    Post #9 - December 29th, 2019, 6:34 pm Post #9 - December 29th, 2019, 6:34 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:Now I am thinking about how to use this. Any ideas

    Plate pickled hocks with 5 or 6 pickled eggs, raw onion, dollop of horseradish mustard. Brown bread, crackers, pretzels. 12-pack macro brew.

    Done and done.

    Stay well upwind of your father for the next few days.
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    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #10 - December 29th, 2019, 9:07 pm
    Post #10 - December 29th, 2019, 9:07 pm Post #10 - December 29th, 2019, 9:07 pm
    Hi,

    Thanks, Gary.

    I am thinking of making the red beans and rice with the pickled pork.

    I hope to find something else and will advise.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #11 - January 3rd, 2020, 2:21 pm
    Post #11 - January 3rd, 2020, 2:21 pm Post #11 - January 3rd, 2020, 2:21 pm
    For future need - I did find this:

    https://www.cajungrocer.com/catalog/pro ... RYQAvD_BwE
  • Post #12 - January 3rd, 2020, 7:30 pm
    Post #12 - January 3rd, 2020, 7:30 pm Post #12 - January 3rd, 2020, 7:30 pm
    Most of the old neighborhood bars had a 2 gallon jar of pickled pigs feet on the back bar.You may want check with tavern suppliers to see if they are still available.
    I still remember my grand father chewing on a foot with his beer.What a mess !!!
  • Post #13 - January 6th, 2020, 12:00 pm
    Post #13 - January 6th, 2020, 12:00 pm Post #13 - January 6th, 2020, 12:00 pm
    Finally opened the jar of boneless pickled pork hocks to serve to my Mom. "I now understand why my Dad liked it. These are delicious."

    Most of the jar went into the red bean and rice for the small household exchange. I agree, these are pretty good.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #14 - January 11th, 2020, 3:45 pm
    Post #14 - January 11th, 2020, 3:45 pm Post #14 - January 11th, 2020, 3:45 pm
    C2, way back in 2010 you got involved with someone who gave you a "sweet pickled pork cottage roll" which is, in fact, a Canadian speciality: boneless pork shoulder butt, pickled in a sweet brine.

    Geo

    https://www.cooksinfo.com/sweet-pickled-cottage-roll
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)

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