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Char Siu, AKA MUU DAENG

Char Siu, AKA MUU DAENG
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  • Char Siu, AKA MUU DAENG

    Post #1 - February 9th, 2005, 9:04 pm
    Post #1 - February 9th, 2005, 9:04 pm Post #1 - February 9th, 2005, 9:04 pm
    I've been requested to post the DIY BBQ pork recipe I spoke of yesterday. As I said, it's as easy as a mud pie, and awfully good. The recipe is from a dandy cookbook I picked up a couple of years back, called "Thai Cooking Class," by Somi Anuntra Miller and Patricia Lake. It was published in New Zealand/Australia by Bay Books, a division of Harper Collins, in 1992. Best eight bucks I ever spent - there are some really outstanding and very easy recipes in it, and the food-porn quality photography is very nice. The garnish instructional pages are to die for.

    Any way, here's what you do:


    To start, you need a boneless pork loin. The recipe calls for one pound, and indicates that your trim the fat, but I used a two+ pound piece of meat, and left the bulk of the fat on, since American pork is overly lean. I skipped the first step of adding 1/2 - 1 tsp of red food coloring and 3 - 6 tbsp of water to a Zippy bag to get that lurid red color, but if you want to, do that, add the loin, squish it around, and let it sit while you put together the marinade. BTW, if the loin is rolled, unroll it, as you want the maximum possible surface area to be exposed to the marinade.

    The marinade:

    3 - 6 cloves garlic, peeled
    1-2 tbsp of gingerroot - eyeball a chunk of root and cut it off

    Get out the food processor, and with the machine running, drop the garlic and ginger down the feed tube and mince finely. (Alternatively, just mince by hand, or pound in a mortar. These are to taste - there are a lot of strong flavors in this.)

    Add to processor (or mix with garlic and ginger in a smallish bowl):

    2 tbsp fish sauce
    2 tbsp soy or tamari
    4 tbsp Hoisin sauce
    2 tbsp Shao Xing or dry sherry
    2 tbsp sugar (I used palm sugar, as noted, but brown or white are ok)
    1/2 -1 tsp Five-Spice Powder (to taste)
    3-6 star anise, crushed, to taste (or you can substitute 1 tsp ground fennel seed)
    2 tbsp sesame oil

    Combine ingredients, either in processor or with whisk, til sugar is dissolved - it takes just a few seconds, even by hand. If you want, you can grind the star anise in an electric spice grinder first, and then add to the mixture.

    Pour in the bag with the pork, squish it around to get the pork well-acquainted with the marinade, put in the fridge, and forget it til tomorrow.

    Tomorrow, preheat the oven to 450. Remove the pork loin from the marinade, and pour the marinade into saucepan; heat to boiling, then cool. Put a rack in a roaster, add about a cup of water to the roaster, put the pork on the rack, and pop into the oven. Let it roast for about 15 minutes, baste with the reserved marinade, and turn down the over to 350. Roast for about an hour, depending on the size and shape of the meat, basting when you think of it and adding more water if it boils dry. I cooked mine to an internal temp of about 160 or so.

    Let rest for 15 minutes minimum before slicing, or leave whole. When I chilled mine, I put the Muu Daeng in a deep plastic container, and poured the remaining marinade over it.

    I'd use the minimum amount of five-spice, star anise, ginger, and garlic the first time, and adjust to your taste.


    Enjoy, and do try to find the cookbook if you can. It's a little gold mine.

    :twisted:
  • Post #2 - February 9th, 2005, 11:36 pm
    Post #2 - February 9th, 2005, 11:36 pm Post #2 - February 9th, 2005, 11:36 pm
    Thanks for the recipe. It sounds great.
  • Post #3 - February 10th, 2005, 1:21 am
    Post #3 - February 10th, 2005, 1:21 am Post #3 - February 10th, 2005, 1:21 am
    My pleasure, Jesper. I'd love to hear what everyone who prepares it thinks of the recipe. Seriously, it took longer to write it down than it does to make it!

    :twisted:
  • Post #4 - February 11th, 2005, 9:37 am
    Post #4 - February 11th, 2005, 9:37 am Post #4 - February 11th, 2005, 9:37 am
    I will be trying this out Sunday with pork tenderloin (adjusting cooking times accordingly) and will post back.

    Marc
  • Post #5 - February 20th, 2005, 11:36 am
    Post #5 - February 20th, 2005, 11:36 am Post #5 - February 20th, 2005, 11:36 am
    This is a nice recipe, thanks. The best part about it is that I had pretty much all of the ingredients already in my kitchen. I gave it a try last weekend and I have one key observation:

    I think it's important to use a flatter blade-cut of the pork loin. I had a center cut of the loin which was thicker and rounder, exposing much less of the flesh to the marinade. (It was what I had in the freezer). I picked up a flatter cut for my freezer.

    Also, I always use a polder probe thermometer when cooking big hunks of meat. I set it to 156 and took it out of the oven to let carryover take it the rest of the way. It was delicious.

    After we ate half of it with some fresh Shanghai Choy and shitakes, I sliced the rest thin and froze the slices to throw in my udon or ramen soups.

    I also skipped the red food coloring. Here's a pic of the resting meat next to the veggies waiting for the pan:

    Image

    Best,
    Michael / EC
  • Post #6 - February 21st, 2005, 1:23 am
    Post #6 - February 21st, 2005, 1:23 am Post #6 - February 21st, 2005, 1:23 am
    Looks delicious! Re the shape of the meat, butterflying it would work nicely, too. The success of this dish is in the tweaking, and it is great to have a chunk in the fridge at all times.

    I used the rest of my latest batch in a braise on Saturday which comprised firsm tofu, thin slices of the pork(and plenty of them), reconstituted black fungus and dried shittake, ginger, and minced shallots. The braising potion was of a tablespoon each of shao xing, oyster sauce, garlic and black bean sauce, and soy, a teaspoon of palm sugar, and a teaspoon of chile paste, with enough water added to make sufficient liquid to gently stew the tofu long enough to absorb all of the good flavors (and to moisten the rice that accompanied it). A good sprinkle of chopped green onions made for a nice finish. Very satisfying on such a cold, nasty night - and it seemed to do wonders for a budding case of the sniffles. I feel like I am absolutely now bursting with renewed good health. 8)

    :twisted:
  • Post #7 - February 25th, 2005, 2:24 pm
    Post #7 - February 25th, 2005, 2:24 pm Post #7 - February 25th, 2005, 2:24 pm
    I'm always a little nervous about admitting I've tried a recipe when I've actually tried a pretty feeble variation. I'll never admit, for example, that I've made Antonius' Bucatina alla Matriciana with the wrong brand of tomatoes, pancetta instead of guanciale, and [hiding my head in shame] garlic, even though it was wonderful and is now in regular rotation. But since you asked for feedback, let me admit that I also made this minus, since I didn't have them in the house, both the fish sauce and the five spice powder. Terrific. Easy. It will become my default pork loin preparation. Thank you so much. And when I finally make it right, I'll let you know how that goes too.

    p.s. and edited to also admit that I used Indian garlic ginger paste instead of the fresh stuff.
  • Post #8 - February 25th, 2005, 9:26 pm
    Post #8 - February 25th, 2005, 9:26 pm Post #8 - February 25th, 2005, 9:26 pm
    This marinade looked so good, I used it for a big. beautiful, meaty piece of pork belly. Marinated it for 3 days. Rather than roast it in the oven, I smoked it in the pit at ~250F for six hours. Just pulled it out and while wrapping it, several pieces flew into my mouth, quite by accident :wink: .

    It was great - juicy, tender, and full of Asian flavors. I am planning to use some of it on Sunday for a stir fry, a kind of thrice-cooked pork variation on a mushu pork theme. I'll let you know how it comes out.

    Thanks for posting the recipe.

    Bill/SFNM
  • Post #9 - February 26th, 2005, 8:32 am
    Post #9 - February 26th, 2005, 8:32 am Post #9 - February 26th, 2005, 8:32 am
    Bill/SFNM wrote:This marinade looked so good, I used it for a big. beautiful, meaty piece of pork belly. Marinated it for 3 days. Rather than roast it in the oven, I smoked it in the pit at ~250F for six hours.

    Iron Chef BBQ,

    As to pork belly in Sundevilpeg's marinade, then on the smoker for 6-hours. Oh yes!

    I was at Chicago Food Corp a couple of days ago buying kimchee and pork belly to make ViaChgo's kimchee chigae, post w/pictures to come, and the chunks-o-pork belly were really nice. I think I'll start the marinade today and smoke the Char Siu tomorrow on the WSM. I might try a couple of racks of ribs in the marinade as well, just for kicks.

    Speaking of Chicago Food Corp, the Pulaski location, the one that burned down last year, is coming along nicely. The rear (huge) warehouse facility seems to be open for business, but they have not started construction of the front retail facility, if, in fact, they plan on reopening the retail aspect.

    Enjoy,
    Gary

    Chicago Food Corp
    3333 N Kimball Ave
    Chicago, IL
    773-478-5566
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #10 - February 27th, 2005, 4:08 am
    Post #10 - February 27th, 2005, 4:08 am Post #10 - February 27th, 2005, 4:08 am
    I am so glad you all seem to like this recipe as much as I do, and the variations on the basic theme are surely what good cooking is all about. Its beauty is in its versatility - using different cuts of pork, leaving out/adding more of various ingredients and varying the length of the marinating time, and using different cooking methods. I mean, smoked? Three days marination? Pork belly? I'm so there, dude. 8)

    Again, thanks. Some recipes are so good and so foolproof and sooooo easy that it would be evil to keep them to myself. And if you see that cookbook, BUY IT!

    :twisted:
  • Post #11 - February 27th, 2005, 2:10 pm
    Post #11 - February 27th, 2005, 2:10 pm Post #11 - February 27th, 2005, 2:10 pm
    Here is a photo of Moo Shoo with Smoked Pork Belly and Mandarin Pancakes using sundevilpeg's marinade. Hope I get this right since this is my first attempt to post a photo here. I would have taken a better photo, but the starvng hoardes were yelling at me to put down the damn camera and serve the food!

    Image

    Note the use of handmade pancakes. Don't you hate the machine-made cardboard-tasting ones that are served so often? Please tell me that LTH makes them fresh if they make them at all.

    Bill/SFNM
  • Post #12 - February 27th, 2005, 3:10 pm
    Post #12 - February 27th, 2005, 3:10 pm Post #12 - February 27th, 2005, 3:10 pm
    Oh, my goodness. Does that ever look delicious. The presentation is just magnificent.

    *bows humbly*

    My compliments to the Chef!

    :twisted:
  • Post #13 - February 27th, 2005, 3:41 pm
    Post #13 - February 27th, 2005, 3:41 pm Post #13 - February 27th, 2005, 3:41 pm
    Bill/SFNM wrote:Note the use of handmade pancakes. Don't you hate the machine-made cardboard-tasting ones that are served so often? Please tell me that LTH makes them fresh if they make them at all.

    Bill/SFNM


    That looks delicious! You have inspired me. I'll be making a similar dish next weekend (along with ChiNOLA's duck/chile/bacon kabobs).

    On another note, I'm sorry to report the the pancakes at LTH are the one dissapointing thing they serve. I think even GWiv will reluctantly agree. When we ordered peking duck at LTH, the pancakes were served cold (as in slightly below room temp) and store bought. I was amazed, but other people had the same experience in some follow up visits. Somewhere on Chowhound is a thread about it.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #14 - February 27th, 2005, 3:55 pm
    Post #14 - February 27th, 2005, 3:55 pm Post #14 - February 27th, 2005, 3:55 pm
    Hi,

    I've got two approaches to making Chinese doilies/pancakes:

    1. Quick and dirty: store bought flour tortillas, which pick apart to make two tortillas from one. I will lightly grill them on sesame oil and steam.

    2. Long: I will make the dough with hot water, flour and salt. Divide dough in half, then cut into X segments. I will take each segment to hand form into a disk, then dip half in sesame oil and press against another segment of equal size. I will use a tortilla press (saw this done in Chinatown) to press the segments together and finish with a small rolling pin to size. Cook them on a griddle, where the heat pushes them apart to separate segments, then steam.

    The long version is very delicate, has wonderful fragrance and taste. Though quick and dirty has its merits and is a considerable time saver.

    What you made looks very good and certainly is inspiring to a lot of people.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #15 - February 27th, 2005, 4:08 pm
    Post #15 - February 27th, 2005, 4:08 pm Post #15 - February 27th, 2005, 4:08 pm
    stevez wrote:On another note, I'm sorry to report the the pancakes at LTH are the one dissapointing thing they serve. I think even GWiv will reluctantly agree. When we ordered peking duck at LTH, the pancakes were served cold (as in slightly below room temp) and store bought.


    What a letdown! :cry: I thought LTH was the non plus ultra of Chinese food. In LTH's defense, cold machine-made pancakes are probably better than ones that have been nuked for a few hours in the microwave as is the local custom.

    Bill/SFNM
  • Post #16 - February 28th, 2005, 6:54 am
    Post #16 - February 28th, 2005, 6:54 am Post #16 - February 28th, 2005, 6:54 am
    Bill/SFNM wrote:What a letdown! :cry: I thought LTH was the non plus ultra of Chinese food.

    Iron Chef BBQ,

    Ignore Steve Z's comments, he drinks on the weekends. :shock: :lol: :shock:

    Oh, ok, LTH does use tortillas straight from the package with Peking Duck. Though, I'm sure, if asked they'd be happy to warm them on a griddle.

    ( in my best Homer Simpson voice, Hummmmmmmmm, Peking Duck )

    By the way, your Moo Sho looks Fantastic

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #17 - March 1st, 2005, 3:41 am
    Post #17 - March 1st, 2005, 3:41 am Post #17 - March 1st, 2005, 3:41 am
    This is to Bill in Santa Fe:

    Chicago may seemingly have every foodstuff imaginable available, but we are cursed with the WORST FLOUR TORTILLAS on God's green earth (plus no edible green corn tamales anywhere, even during Lent, but that's a want beyond all hope of achieving, sad to say). If you need any offbeat Thai or Vietnamese ingredient (say, my aforementioned and much-used palm sugar, Panang curry paste, fresh galangal root, fresh lime leaves, or such), I'd be more than willing to send whatever you need, if you could in return send me one package of proper burro-sized flour tortillas. Or name your price. Any other Mexican ingredient I could possibly want is available here, apart from Hatch chiles, and those I can get roasted and frozen, or grow my own reasonable approximation. But the tortillas are like my personal Holy Grail.....

    Drop a note if you see fit to do so. Y un mil de gracias!

    :twisted:
  • Post #18 - March 1st, 2005, 10:10 am
    Post #18 - March 1st, 2005, 10:10 am Post #18 - March 1st, 2005, 10:10 am
    sundevilpeg wrote:Chicago may seemingly have every foodstuff imaginable available, but we are cursed with the WORST FLOUR TORTILLAS on God's green earth...


    sdp:

    It seems to me that for a lot of Chicago's Mexican population, flour tortillas were often something made at home, whereas corn tortillas were more likely to be bought from a tortilleria. This impression I get from Mexican friends who 'reminisce' about mom's or grandma's tortillas. In a way, I see a parallel between Italian neighbourhoods in the States and also small towns in Italy, where fresh pasta -- either of the egg or semolina varieties -- cannot be bought because it is something strictly made at home. And just as the flour tortillas seem lousy to you, I find commercially made fresh pasta generally wretched. But in some places, of course, where there are the right demographic and economic conditions, good commercial products can be and are produced.

    Have you been to Polo (small restaurant, breakfast and lunch only, 18th Street near Laflin -- search for further discussion on this board)? They make their own flour tortillas and, while I know they are denser and lardier than some think they should be, they are tasty. Flour tortillas of a quality higher than the ones available in the groceery stores are the ones sold at the counter in that Norteño bulwark of Pilsen, Nuevo Leon (18th Street, just east of Ashland). These tortillas may not wholly satisfy you but again, if memory serves me well, they are better than most of the brands available in the stores.

    Antonius
    Last edited by Antonius on January 28th, 2013, 5:41 am, edited 1 time in total.
    Alle Nerven exzitiert von dem gewürzten Wein -- Anwandlung von Todesahndungen -- Doppeltgänger --
    - aus dem Tagebuch E.T.A. Hoffmanns, 6. Januar 1804.
    ________
    Na sir is na seachain an cath.
  • Post #19 - March 1st, 2005, 12:35 pm
    Post #19 - March 1st, 2005, 12:35 pm Post #19 - March 1st, 2005, 12:35 pm
    sundevilpeg wrote:Chicago may seemingly have every foodstuff imaginable available, but we are cursed with the WORST FLOUR TORTILLAS on God's green earth


    Sundevilpeg,

    I'm sure you know that most regions of Mexico have no flour tortillas and the inhabitants of those regions think, for some odd reason, that a burro is a beast of burden. Flour tortillas are a staple in the northern states. I would guess that Chicago is more populated by immigrants from corn tortilla eating regions.

    So what kind of flour tortilla do you have in mind? In these parts, tortillas for burros are pretty much the same as regular ones, just of larger diameter. However, in Arizona where I was born, they make a paper thin flour tortilla that is often sold folded up like a hanky. These are, by far, the very best for making burros. Sadly, these are not something I have found locally. Most immigrants around here are from the state of Chihuahua, probably the drabbest color in the rich culinary palette that is Mexico.

    Don't get me started on green corn tamales.

    Bill/SFNM
  • Post #20 - March 1st, 2005, 1:04 pm
    Post #20 - March 1st, 2005, 1:04 pm Post #20 - March 1st, 2005, 1:04 pm
    Bill/SFNM wrote:I'm sure you know that most regions of Mexico have no flour tortillas and the inhabitants of those regions think, for some odd reason, that a burro is a beast of burden. Flour tortillas are a staple in the northern states. I would guess that Chicago is more populated by immigrants from corn tortilla eating regions.


    More recent waves of immigration have, roughly speaking, come from areas progressively further south and more purely corn-tortilla oriented but there is an old stratum of Mejicanos Chicagoenses from the far north -- I have the impression that a very significant portion of the Mexican population that settled in parts of the mostly Italian Taylor Street corridor were from the northen States of Mexico (such as the folks who own the restaurant Nuevo Leon).

    But home-made flour tortillas were/are also made by folks from further south. A friend of mine of Jaliscan origins grew up in post WWII Chicago with tortillas de harina made by his mother on a regular basis. That might reflect adaptation to the (lack of?) availablilty of masa or maybe also cultural Ausgleich -- levelling, mixing, development of a new local culture not corresponding to any one regional culture in the homeland.

    The best of the commercial flour tortillas available here are, I think, the 'home style' (the name of one brand might even be "Casera") ones which are a little bit thicker and airier than the basic products of the bigger brands. They're not all that similar to hand-made tortillas but when fresh and warm, not too bad.

    Antonius
    Alle Nerven exzitiert von dem gewürzten Wein -- Anwandlung von Todesahndungen -- Doppeltgänger --
    - aus dem Tagebuch E.T.A. Hoffmanns, 6. Januar 1804.
    ________
    Na sir is na seachain an cath.
  • Post #21 - March 1st, 2005, 1:47 pm
    Post #21 - March 1st, 2005, 1:47 pm Post #21 - March 1st, 2005, 1:47 pm
    Bill in Santa Fe wrote:

    However, in Arizona where I was born, they make a paper thin flour tortilla that is often sold folded up like a hanky.


    That, gentlemen, is precisely what I'm speaking of. I'm looking for thinner, not thicker, and big - maybe 16 inches in diameter. I've tried making my own, but I can't get them thin enough or big enough, in that I'm not equipped with a griddle as big as the original cooking device for these beauties, that being the top of an oil drum.

    *sigh*

    :twisted:
  • Post #22 - March 1st, 2005, 2:02 pm
    Post #22 - March 1st, 2005, 2:02 pm Post #22 - March 1st, 2005, 2:02 pm
    sundevilpeg,

    I too, have tried making the paper thin ones, even to the point of using my pasta roller - right thickness, wrong taste and texture.

    I regret I won't be able to take you up, for now, on your very kind offer to trade foodstuffs. Many years ago, I came back from Tucson with a big bag full of tortillas (and green corn tamales). They froze quite well. If you're a true sundevil (Tempe?), maybe a trip to Arizona is in your future and you can fill up your freezer?

    Bill/SFNM
  • Post #23 - March 1st, 2005, 3:06 pm
    Post #23 - March 1st, 2005, 3:06 pm Post #23 - March 1st, 2005, 3:06 pm
    Bill, Sundevilpeg:

    Sometime back Amata and I were considering attending a conference in Hermosillo and got rather excited about the prospect of going there and eating carne asada with those big thin tortillas. I remembered seeing some pictures of them and, with Amata's help, have tracked down the name for these things: sobaqueras (<-- sobaco 'armpit', since they extend from hand to armpit). I take it these are common but not the basic flour tortilla of Sonora and neighbouring parts of northwestern Mexico (such as Arizona :wink: )

    We should have gone to that conference and skipped out on all the talks...

    Antonius
    Alle Nerven exzitiert von dem gewürzten Wein -- Anwandlung von Todesahndungen -- Doppeltgänger --
    - aus dem Tagebuch E.T.A. Hoffmanns, 6. Januar 1804.
    ________
    Na sir is na seachain an cath.
  • Post #24 - March 1st, 2005, 7:55 pm
    Post #24 - March 1st, 2005, 7:55 pm Post #24 - March 1st, 2005, 7:55 pm
    Antonius wrote:sobaqueras (<-- sobaco 'armpit', since they extend from hand to armpit).


    What a relief that sobaco refers to dimension rather than the method used to warm the tortillas! :twisted:
  • Post #25 - March 2nd, 2005, 7:35 am
    Post #25 - March 2nd, 2005, 7:35 am Post #25 - March 2nd, 2005, 7:35 am
    sundevilpeg wrote:I've been requested to post the DIY BBQ pork recipe I spoke of yesterday.

    SunDevilPeg,

    You recipe has started a landslide of home Char Siu making the world has seldom seen. Well, ok, maybe not the world, but it's early and my resistance to hyperbole is weak. :)

    Seriously though, not including the people on the board who have posted they are making, or have made, your recipe I personally know of three more, myself included. I'm betting this is just the tip of the iceberg.

    This is one of many unexpected, very cool, results of LTHForum, people posting personal, time tested, known to be killer recipes for people to try. Antonious's Bucatini alla Matriciana, viaChgo's Kimchee Chigae, your Char Siu, just to name recipes I have personally made just within the last couple of weeks, with chiNOLA's jalapeno/bacon duck breast in the wings for this weekend.

    I currently have 4 pieces of piggy in Char Siu marinade, pork loin, pork belly (thanks Bill/SFNM) a smallish hunk of rind-on bacon, just to see what happens, and a rack of spare ribs. I plan on low and slow smoking the belly, ribs and bacon and either, what I call hot smoke/roast, or oven roast the pork loin. Hot smoke/roast is in the 350-375 degree range which I use for lean, and/or tender, cuts that would not take well to low and slow.

    I've taken a few pictures of my preparation, I will post when I make the Char Sui.

    Thanks for posting the recipe.

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #26 - March 2nd, 2005, 3:41 pm
    Post #26 - March 2nd, 2005, 3:41 pm Post #26 - March 2nd, 2005, 3:41 pm
    I, too, succumbed to SDP's siren song. Omitted the fish sauce, but added Pearl River Bridge Superior light and dark soy sauces and Har Har Pickle Food Factory's Soybean Sauce. The only product I didn't have on hand, Hoisin sauce, led to my visiting several major supermarkets before I found a bottle(House of Tsang) with fermented soybeans listed as the first ingredient. Also, I included the red food coloring because it's fun to dye meat.

    It sure turned out yummy.
  • Post #27 - March 2nd, 2005, 5:05 pm
    Post #27 - March 2nd, 2005, 5:05 pm Post #27 - March 2nd, 2005, 5:05 pm
    G Wiv wrote:I currently have 4 pieces of piggy in Char Siu marinade, pork loin, pork belly (thanks Bill/SFNM) a smallish hunk of rind-on bacon, just to see what happens, and a rack of spare ribs.


    Gary-san,

    Once you smoke the marinated pork belly, I strongly suggest you try the following. If it weren't so delicious, it would definitely qualify for inclusion in my next book,
    Fusion Gone Wrong! - When Bad Things Happen to Good Ingredients which is the sequel to my unpublished, yet classic masterpiece, 10 Stupid Things People Do to Their Cold Cuts.

    Cut the belly into slices and fry up just like bacon. Then make hand roll using the bacon, lettuce, tomato, avocado, & wasabi mayo like so:

    Image


    Bill/SFNM
  • Post #28 - March 2nd, 2005, 5:23 pm
    Post #28 - March 2nd, 2005, 5:23 pm Post #28 - March 2nd, 2005, 5:23 pm
    Bill,

    I bought a 5 - 6 lb chunk of belly with the ribs still attached yesterday. I'm getting ready to cut off the ribs and put both the belly and the ribs in the marinade for smoking this weekend. You can be sure that some of the finished product will end up as BLT temaki.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #29 - March 2nd, 2005, 5:38 pm
    Post #29 - March 2nd, 2005, 5:38 pm Post #29 - March 2nd, 2005, 5:38 pm
    stevez wrote:I bought a 5 - 6 lb chunk of belly with the ribs still attached yesterday. I'm getting ready to cut off the ribs and put both the belly and the ribs in the marinade for smoking this weekend. You can be sure that some of the finished product will end up as BLT temaki.


    Steve, Did you find this ribbed chunk o'belly at Chinatown Market as planned? Good price?
  • Post #30 - March 2nd, 2005, 6:28 pm
    Post #30 - March 2nd, 2005, 6:28 pm Post #30 - March 2nd, 2005, 6:28 pm
    Yes. They had a whole uncut belly section including 6 ribs still attached. I think it cost around $11.00. I'm very excited about getting a piece this big...and some spares as a bonus.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven

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