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Char Siu, AKA MUU DAENG

Char Siu, AKA MUU DAENG
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  • Post #61 - May 8th, 2008, 11:10 pm
    Post #61 - May 8th, 2008, 11:10 pm Post #61 - May 8th, 2008, 11:10 pm
    LTH,

    Not exactly Char Siu, but I thought I'd pop my Chinese BBQ Sparerib effort in this thread. I followed the recipe in Saveur May 2008 (#111), though I left out the red food coloring and used my smoker not oven.

    I've made Chinese BBQ Spareribs on the smoker a few times, Bill SF/NM, BBQ man extraordinaire, posted a recipe to a BBQ listserve back in '03,* so couldn't resist trying the Saveur recipe.

    Chinese style BBQ Ribs (Saint Louis) in middle, flanked by American BBQ ribs (loin back).

    Image

    Chinese BBQ ribs were delicious, light smoke complimenting sweet, salty, rich meaty pork ribs, though next time out I will add fresh ginger and hot peppers to the marinade.

    Enjoy,
    Gary

    *Bill SF/NM recently posted a picture of absolutely delicious looking, and I am sure tasting, Asian style BBQ ribs to the Random Food Pictures Thread
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #62 - May 9th, 2008, 6:08 am
    Post #62 - May 9th, 2008, 6:08 am Post #62 - May 9th, 2008, 6:08 am
    Gary--

    Knowing you, I'd bet you tweaked the recipe a bit! :) Care to share?

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #63 - May 9th, 2008, 6:31 am
    Post #63 - May 9th, 2008, 6:31 am Post #63 - May 9th, 2008, 6:31 am
    Geo wrote:Knowing you, I'd bet you tweaked the recipe a bit! :) Care to share?

    Geo,

    First time out I typically stick pretty close to the stated recipe and, as I had a number of plates spinning when I made the Saveur marinade, I pretty much check-listed it. I did, as mentioned, leave out the food coloring and used a smoker not oven. I also added more garlic than called for.

    Next time out I'll add fresh ginger and some heat, probably jalapeno, though the fruity notes and blistering heat of habanero would match well.

    I suggest trying the Saveur Chinese Barbecued Spareribs, simple, inexpensive with a big flavor payoff.

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #64 - June 6th, 2008, 9:45 pm
    Post #64 - June 6th, 2008, 9:45 pm Post #64 - June 6th, 2008, 9:45 pm
    G Wiv wrote:Next time out I'll add fresh ginger and some heat, probably jalapeno, though the fruity notes and blistering heat of habanero would match well.

    LTH,

    Went another round with Chinese BBQ today, template was still Saveur but I drifted from the recipe quite a bit. Smoked with lump charcoal and hickory, triple the garlic and an inch of ginger, both of which I grated on a microplane, I also added crushed red pepper and crushed red pepper that had been finely ground in a coffee grinder.

    I thought it turned out pretty well, though I still intend trying habanero for its fruity notes as well as heat.

    Chinese BBQ Spare Ribs (6.6.08)

    Image

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #65 - July 31st, 2010, 9:16 pm
    Post #65 - July 31st, 2010, 9:16 pm Post #65 - July 31st, 2010, 9:16 pm
    Are many Chinese places in town using wood smoke in their cooks for chinese BBQ?
  • Post #66 - July 31st, 2010, 9:44 pm
    Post #66 - July 31st, 2010, 9:44 pm Post #66 - July 31st, 2010, 9:44 pm
    I once visited the old Sun Wah's kitchen, and saw that the large upright ovens were gas fired.

    There was pork belly everywhere! It was thrilling.

    :twisted:
    "Bass Trombone is the Lead Trumpet of the Deep."
    Rick Hammett
  • Post #67 - June 29th, 2011, 10:55 pm
    Post #67 - June 29th, 2011, 10:55 pm Post #67 - June 29th, 2011, 10:55 pm
    I took delivery of a 6.02lb Berkshire pork belly this evening that's going to get the char siu marinade treatment from tomorrow through Monday.

    Image

    Unfortunately, I'm not bringing my WSM up to Eagle River with me for the weekend, so I'll just have to make do with an oven and a roasting rack.

    I'll post updates when I return on Tuesday.
    -Pete
  • Post #68 - June 30th, 2011, 8:50 am
    Post #68 - June 30th, 2011, 8:50 am Post #68 - June 30th, 2011, 8:50 am
    I look forward to your results. I love char siu and just picked up a pork belly myself and have been debating what to do with it.
  • Post #69 - September 1st, 2015, 4:53 pm
    Post #69 - September 1st, 2015, 4:53 pm Post #69 - September 1st, 2015, 4:53 pm
    I got the taste for making some BBQ pork lo mein after eating a satisfyingly brown-sauced version from 65 Kitchen in the Loop. One of my favorite places for greasy Chinese American food. Meathead is a trusted source for this sort of recipe so I gave his version a try: http://amazingribs.com/recipes/porknogr ... _ribs.html

    I had boneless shoulder cuts on hand so I bagged those up with the marinade for 24 hours. That fire engine red color is a crucial part of char siu for me so I didn't skip the food coloring:
    Image

    20 minutes in the oven and 10 min under the broiler later:
    Image

    Taste of the meat was spot on, now it's lo mein time.
  • Post #70 - September 1st, 2015, 6:19 pm
    Post #70 - September 1st, 2015, 6:19 pm Post #70 - September 1st, 2015, 6:19 pm
    hell yeah
  • Post #71 - September 1st, 2015, 6:27 pm
    Post #71 - September 1st, 2015, 6:27 pm Post #71 - September 1st, 2015, 6:27 pm
    This dinner really hit the spot:

    Image
  • Post #72 - September 1st, 2015, 7:19 pm
    Post #72 - September 1st, 2015, 7:19 pm Post #72 - September 1st, 2015, 7:19 pm
    That really looks fantastic - nice job!
  • Post #73 - September 2nd, 2015, 4:31 pm
    Post #73 - September 2nd, 2015, 4:31 pm Post #73 - September 2nd, 2015, 4:31 pm
    BR wrote:That really looks fantastic - nice job!


    Thanks! Even cheap Chinese places have that high heat flame which gives you that smoky wok hei flavor you can't get at home, but I figured a partial workaround: burnt sugar. If you caramelize some sugar in the skillet while stir-frying your aromatics, it's almost like the real thing.
  • Post #74 - September 2nd, 2015, 4:58 pm
    Post #74 - September 2nd, 2015, 4:58 pm Post #74 - September 2nd, 2015, 4:58 pm
    Yeah man, that bowl of Lo mein looks great.

    Really nice job on the pork, great color.
  • Post #75 - November 22nd, 2020, 2:13 pm
    Post #75 - November 22nd, 2020, 2:13 pm Post #75 - November 22nd, 2020, 2:13 pm
    Hi,

    I made about four pounds of Char Siu using a new-to-me recipe. I don't like it as much as Sundevilpeg's, so we will be using this up fast. We have eaten directly, in a fried rice and tomorrow in some bao.

    My intention was to store this char siu to use in bits and pieces over the winter. I think I should have gone with my gut thought to add more star anise when preparing the marinade. Just about every time I ignore it, I am sorry later.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #76 - November 23rd, 2020, 2:16 pm
    Post #76 - November 23rd, 2020, 2:16 pm Post #76 - November 23rd, 2020, 2:16 pm
    Hi,

    Last night, I came upon an Australian website suggesting sesame pancakes with Char Siu. Flour, milk, eggs and sesame seeds, you have your basic crepe. I made the batter, then let it sit overnight in the refrigerator.

    I then made Korean pickled Daikon radish cut into slivers. This radish has been in the fridge for perhaps a month or and still looks fresh from the market.

    This morning after making an omelet for Mom, I went straight into making the crepes. It was a non-stick pan, so almost no oil was used.

    For lunch today, I reheated the crepes, then put them in the oven set to warm along with our plates. I cut the char siu on an angle and reheated it, too.

    At the table, I placed a crepe on the plate, lined char siu like little soldiers just below center, arranged some pickled daikon above the pork and dotted Hoisin sauce underneath. I then rolled up from the Hoisin sauce over the char siu and pickled Daikon.

    My Dad when he found the pancakes earlier, thought I had made palačinke (pah-lah-CHEEN-keh). They are really quite close, but not quite. Close enough for Dad, who used some crepes for savory and then treated the rest as dessert.

    I did roll a crepe in apple sauce. My Mom wanted more Char Siu. Everyone was happy with their choices. I got the ultimate compliment, "You can make this again."

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #77 - December 1st, 2020, 5:09 pm
    Post #77 - December 1st, 2020, 5:09 pm Post #77 - December 1st, 2020, 5:09 pm
    I have been making char siu regularly lately using the NY Times recipe, which includes red fermented tofu, which lends a reddish color. It turns out quite well, though I don't cook it at the very high temps they recommend. I do marinate it for at least 24 hours. It keeps well in the freezer, too, once cooked.

    https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/102 ... rlic-bread
    Leek

    SAVING ONE DOG may not change the world,
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  • Post #78 - December 1st, 2020, 5:30 pm
    Post #78 - December 1st, 2020, 5:30 pm Post #78 - December 1st, 2020, 5:30 pm
    leek wrote:I have been making char siu regularly lately using the NY Times recipe, which includes red fermented tofu, which lends a reddish color. It turns out quite well, though I don't cook it at the very high temps they recommend. I do marinate it for at least 24 hours. It keeps well in the freezer, too, once cooked.

    https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/102 ... rlic-bread

    The recipe/method at Chinese Cooking Demystified's youtube channel, that I made back in September, turned out as good as any I've ever had. That version includes red fermented tofu but it was the red yeast rice, that I think really imparted a deep redness to the color of the final product . . .

    Image
    Char Siu Pork

    About a month later, I went with a very pre-fab version (also recommended at CCD) that was about 75% as good and 90% easier.

    The NYT version looks fairly similar to the second version I made, but using packaged hoisin sauce instead of packaged char siu sauce. I may have to give it a go.

    In any case, if you're into this stuff, the video at CCD is really worth a watch.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain

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