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Dukkah, Duqqa (goose)

Dukkah, Duqqa (goose)
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  • Dukkah, Duqqa (goose)

    Post #1 - March 2nd, 2010, 6:25 pm
    Post #1 - March 2nd, 2010, 6:25 pm Post #1 - March 2nd, 2010, 6:25 pm
    Actually, I think it's pronounced doo'-kuh but that doesn't fit with my bad pun.
    Dukkah has become one of my favorite snacks/condiments. I was sort of surprised to find there aren't many references to it on LTH (this may be one, too--d4v3?) About a year ago, I bought a pack of this mixture at City Olive and decided it would be pretty simple to make. So, I googled it and found that it's an Egyptian mixture of toasted spices and nuts served as a dip for bread or as a side dish. There are lots of recipes online and it's dead easy to make--you just toast spices and nuts, then grind 'em up. I've found recipes with all different combinations of ingredients but generally hazelnuts, almonds and/or pistaschios, coriander seeds, cumin seeds and salt are included. I've also seen dried onion/garlic, dried mint, thyme, black peppercorns, sesame seeds, etc. added. It makes a great appetizer with some crusted bread and good olive oil (makes the bread stick to the dukkah).
    Here are some pics from a recent batch (coriander, cumin, black pepper, pistachios, almonds, sesame seeds, salt and some durkee fried onions I had leftover because, hey, why not).

    Nut mixture
    Image


    Spice mixture
    Image

    Finished product
    Image
  • Post #2 - March 2nd, 2010, 8:56 pm
    Post #2 - March 2nd, 2010, 8:56 pm Post #2 - March 2nd, 2010, 8:56 pm
    thaiobsessed wrote:...and some durkee fried onions I had leftover


    Sorry, not believing it. There's no such thing. :P
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #3 - March 2nd, 2010, 9:12 pm
    Post #3 - March 2nd, 2010, 9:12 pm Post #3 - March 2nd, 2010, 9:12 pm
    JoelF wrote:Sorry, not believing it. There's no such thing. :P

    Leftover Durkee fried onions? Hard for me to believe as well. :shock:

    Aaron Deacon, now of Kansas City, brought home made pita, wonderful olive oil and his version of Dukkah to a party 4-5 years ago. I had never heard of dukkah, one bite and I was hooked. I probably made it a dozen time in a 3-month period, experimenting then settling on Claudia Roden's recipe from "The New Book of Middle Eastern Food"

    I have not made dukkah in a few years, seems a natural now for the weekend. Not sure about Durkee fried onions though. :?

    Thaiobsessed, thanks for the reminder of a forgotten favorite. If you, or anyone else, would like Roden's Dukkah recipe just PM, its copyrighted and, as I have not adapted the recipe in any way, I don't want to post it to the board.

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #4 - March 3rd, 2010, 8:46 am
    Post #4 - March 3rd, 2010, 8:46 am Post #4 - March 3rd, 2010, 8:46 am
    G Wiv wrote:I probably made it a dozen time in a 3-month period, experimenting then settling on Claudia Roden's recipe from "The New Book of Middle Eastern Food"


    I feel sort of silly--I have that book and I was just looking through it to get savory pie ideas for Pi day and I didn't even think to look up her dukkah recipe.

    And trust me, the Durkees add a little je ne sais quoi.
    Maybe I should send Cladia Roden a letter with my brilliant addition...
  • Post #5 - March 3rd, 2010, 9:15 am
    Post #5 - March 3rd, 2010, 9:15 am Post #5 - March 3rd, 2010, 9:15 am
    This is great information - I had never heard of Duqqa (دقة) until reading about it on LTH. I lived in Egypt for some time but never came across it. I have a feeling that I ate it without knowing, as it appears to be used as a garnish more than anything.

    What struck me as distinctly not Egyptian (but delicious sounding nonetheless) was using Duqqa in a similar manner to Levantine Za'atar - as a dip with bread and olive oil. There is no olive oil in Egypt. Well there is, but no one, other than the few who can afford it, actually eats it.

    After doing some googling in Arabic (love the modern world) I came across some mentions of Egyptian Duqqa and its uses. None of them mention olive oil, but do say that it should be sprinkled on ful, roasted potatoes or even mixed into falafel (pre-frying). That sounds a whole lot more Egyptian to me.

    Using it with olive oil is a great idea, but probably one that didn't originate in Egypt's olive oil-meager kitchens. It does however sound like a great and refreshing alternative to Za'atar. And it doesn't probably wouldn't be too bad sprinkled on roasted vegetables either.

    Oh, and the recipes described in this thread all seem to be analogous to what I found online in Arabic. So if random internet information (in Arabic) is a measure of authenticity for any of you out there, LTH got Duqqa right.
    "By the fig, the olive..." Surat Al-Teen, Mecca 95:1"
  • Post #6 - March 3rd, 2010, 9:30 am
    Post #6 - March 3rd, 2010, 9:30 am Post #6 - March 3rd, 2010, 9:30 am
    Thanks for the info, Habibi.
    I think I got the olive oil idea from City Olive (either that, or because I got it an olive oil store it seemed logical). I'll have to try it on roast potatoes. It's also great for crusting meat.
  • Post #7 - March 3rd, 2010, 5:57 pm
    Post #7 - March 3rd, 2010, 5:57 pm Post #7 - March 3rd, 2010, 5:57 pm
    Interesting thread. My sole Egyptian cookbook (Samia Abdennour's "Egyptian Cooking" published by the American University in Cairo Press) calls for what I find an intriguing mixture:

    1 measure salt
    1 measure roasted coriander seeds
    1 measure peanuts
    1/2 measure split chickpeas
    1/2 measure dried mint
    1/2 measure sesame seeds

    all of which get whizzed in a blender. I know what I'm making this weekend!
    Gypsy Boy

    "I am not a glutton--I am an explorer of food." (Erma Bombeck)
  • Post #8 - March 5th, 2010, 9:05 am
    Post #8 - March 5th, 2010, 9:05 am Post #8 - March 5th, 2010, 9:05 am
    Sorry, this has nothing to do with the post really, but I've seen it before and I'm curious—how are people posting in Arabic?
    I want to have a good body, but not as much as I want dessert. ~ Jason Love

    There is no pie in Nighthawks, which is why it's such a desolate image. ~ Happy Stomach

    I write fiction. You can find me—and some stories—on Facebook, Twitter and my website.
  • Post #9 - March 5th, 2010, 9:22 am
    Post #9 - March 5th, 2010, 9:22 am Post #9 - March 5th, 2010, 9:22 am
    Simple. There are actually several ways but the easiest is probably cut and paste. Find something online, cut and paste it directly to the composition box for LTH.
    Gypsy Boy

    "I am not a glutton--I am an explorer of food." (Erma Bombeck)
  • Post #10 - March 30th, 2010, 9:44 am
    Post #10 - March 30th, 2010, 9:44 am Post #10 - March 30th, 2010, 9:44 am
    Made some duqqa this morning to complement some pan fried (in olive oil) sheep milk cheese I brought back from Palestine (more on that later).

    I've never made it before, but it was dead simple and was an excellent match for bread, cheese and olive oil. The recipe basically came out of my head and I make no claims as to authenticity, but I was very satisfied with it. My feeling is that duqqa is whatever you make of it.

    Here goes:

    Almonds, skinless
    tablespoon coriander seeds
    tablespoon baharat (Middle Eastern spice mixture)
    tablespoon sumac
    sprinkle cumin, ground.
    salt to taste

    I didn't use many almonds for this preparation - maybe a 1/4-1/3 of a cup, so if you are going to use more nuts, amp up the spices. And don't be shy.

    I toasted the almonds and coriander until golden brown then whizzed everything in the food processor. Really really good stuff.
    "By the fig, the olive..." Surat Al-Teen, Mecca 95:1"
  • Post #11 - December 22nd, 2021, 7:41 pm
    Post #11 - December 22nd, 2021, 7:41 pm Post #11 - December 22nd, 2021, 7:41 pm
    Been a while but made a nice size batch of Dukkah this evening. So very tasty!

    click to enlarge
    Image
    Image

    Dukkah, count me a Fan!
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #12 - December 22nd, 2021, 11:48 pm
    Post #12 - December 22nd, 2021, 11:48 pm Post #12 - December 22nd, 2021, 11:48 pm
    G Wiv wrote:Been a while but made a nice size batch of Dukkah this evening. So very tasty!

    Makes a nice stocking stuffer, right? :D What do you typically eat it with?

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #13 - December 23rd, 2021, 4:25 am
    Post #13 - December 23rd, 2021, 4:25 am Post #13 - December 23rd, 2021, 4:25 am
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Makes a nice stocking stuffer, right? :D What do you typically eat it with?

    Traditionally, fresh soft pita dunked in olive oil lightly dragged though dukkah. Lots of variations from there, coating for roast chicken thighs to ice cream topping. Goes perfect with fruit and yogurt, adds crunch to turkey on rye and as dip for crunchy veg like Persian cucumbers or radish. Goes well along side zaatar for a dipping combo.

    Re: Stocking stuffer. I'd check my socks if I were you, might just find my nuts on your tree. (That came out weird)

    Note: Still have not gotten the huevos to try adding durkee fried onions a la thaiobsessed. :)~
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #14 - December 24th, 2021, 7:11 am
    Post #14 - December 24th, 2021, 7:11 am Post #14 - December 24th, 2021, 7:11 am
    Lovely combo, dukkah & hummus, feta, drizzle of olive oil, lightly flame toasted pita and a few crunchy veg.

    click to enlarge
    Image

    Dukkah & Hummus, count me a Fan!
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #15 - December 24th, 2021, 9:45 am
    Post #15 - December 24th, 2021, 9:45 am Post #15 - December 24th, 2021, 9:45 am
    Gwiv, your spread looks fantastic. It's fun looking back on some of the older posts as a reminder of the versatility of dukkah.

    G Wiv wrote:Note: Still have not gotten the huevos to try adding durkee fried onions a la thaiobsessed. :)~


    Yeah, I can't believe I did that!
    I still make Dukkah fairly frequently but I forgot about the fried onions.
    Most recently, I made a batch to sprinkle over roast carrots (along with a drizzle of tahini sauce) for Thanksgiving. I added the leftover dukkah and some olive oil to a batch of whole wheat sourdough and it came out great!
    You can't really see the dukkah in the bread but it gave it a really nice, subtle flavor...

    Image

    Image
  • Post #16 - December 24th, 2021, 10:05 am
    Post #16 - December 24th, 2021, 10:05 am Post #16 - December 24th, 2021, 10:05 am
    I have had this Persian-spiced seeds and nuts at a restaurant. Looks kinda similar in flavor profile. It is addictive!


    ETA: This may be the best headline for a post I've seen on LTH. Big ups!
  • Post #17 - December 24th, 2021, 3:11 pm
    Post #17 - December 24th, 2021, 3:11 pm Post #17 - December 24th, 2021, 3:11 pm
    Hi,

    HelloDali brought Dukkah to the LTH picnic some years ago. I took the leftovers home and loved it. I have been meaning to make some ever since.

    Regards,
    CAthy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #18 - January 4th, 2022, 8:07 am
    Post #18 - January 4th, 2022, 8:07 am Post #18 - January 4th, 2022, 8:07 am
    Neighbor gifted us a small boatload of pork & sauerkraut pierogi. Delicious as one might expect from someone who makes 200 at a time and has been doing so for decades. We've made a meal of Barbara's pierogi served with sour cream and salad, plus snacks.

    Pictured, snack of pierogi sprinkled with dukkah, a wonderful combo.

    click to enlarge
    Image Image

    Pierogi, count me a Fan!
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow

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