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Cooking Chow Fun at Home

Cooking Chow Fun at Home
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  • Post #31 - August 25th, 2013, 10:39 pm
    Post #31 - August 25th, 2013, 10:39 pm Post #31 - August 25th, 2013, 10:39 pm
    No, gluten isn't starch. It's protein. I've seen wheat starch in Chinese grocers.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #32 - August 26th, 2013, 8:56 am
    Post #32 - August 26th, 2013, 8:56 am Post #32 - August 26th, 2013, 8:56 am
    JoelF wrote:No, gluten isn't starch. It's protein. I've seen wheat starch in Chinese grocers.

    I guess I was being hopeful, because I do have a box of gluten.

    Reading this comparative of between corn, wheat, potato and arrowroot starches was interesting. In a pinch, I could double the cornstarch until I get the wheat.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #33 - September 5th, 2019, 1:44 am
    Post #33 - September 5th, 2019, 1:44 am Post #33 - September 5th, 2019, 1:44 am
    Not chow fun, pan fried wheat noodle with stir fried chicken thigh and Chinese broccoli. Pan fried noodles make me happy!
    PanFriedP3.jpg Pan fried noodle with stir fried chicken thigh and Chinese broccoli

    PanFriedP1.jpg Pan fried noodles

    Pan fried noodles, count me a Fan!
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #34 - September 5th, 2019, 7:28 am
    Post #34 - September 5th, 2019, 7:28 am Post #34 - September 5th, 2019, 7:28 am
    I know what brand of chili oil someone uses when they are apparently out of homemade.
    I have two Chinese friends at work that pointed me to that brand. I dig it.
    We cannot be friends if you do not know the difference between Mayo and Miracle Whip.
  • Post #35 - September 5th, 2019, 8:14 am
    Post #35 - September 5th, 2019, 8:14 am Post #35 - September 5th, 2019, 8:14 am
    seebee wrote:I know what brand of chili oil someone uses when they are apparently out of homemade.
    I have two Chinese friends at work that pointed me to that brand. I dig it.

    Good eye! First is my chili oil followed closely by my recipe made by a friend such as Ronnie_Suburban. House chili oil from Sun Wah, which they sell by the pint when asked, comes in third.

    When out of all the former Lao Gan Ma Spicy Chili Crisp makes a tasty substitute and is readily available at most any Asian grocery for a hyper reasonable price.
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #36 - September 5th, 2019, 10:26 am
    Post #36 - September 5th, 2019, 10:26 am Post #36 - September 5th, 2019, 10:26 am
    I’ve tried making chow fun at home several times but I have issues getting the noodles not to clump together and then just disintegrate.
  • Post #37 - September 5th, 2019, 10:27 am
    Post #37 - September 5th, 2019, 10:27 am Post #37 - September 5th, 2019, 10:27 am
    Gary,

    You put the fun back in chow fun. Looks delicious! :D

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #38 - September 5th, 2019, 11:00 am
    Post #38 - September 5th, 2019, 11:00 am Post #38 - September 5th, 2019, 11:00 am
    In Gary's chili oil recipe, he references the dried chili's to be hot and fresh. The fresh part is where I get lost. Do dried chili's lose something over time? Is there a "rule" as to when the dried peppers are best? Thanks.
  • Post #39 - September 5th, 2019, 11:52 am
    Post #39 - September 5th, 2019, 11:52 am Post #39 - September 5th, 2019, 11:52 am
    Octarine wrote:I’ve tried making chow fun at home several times but I have issues getting the noodles not to clump together and then just disintegrate.
    SeriousEats has a recipe, which explains some of the ins and outs of making Chow Fun.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #40 - September 5th, 2019, 12:13 pm
    Post #40 - September 5th, 2019, 12:13 pm Post #40 - September 5th, 2019, 12:13 pm
    Octarine wrote:I’ve tried making chow fun at home several times but I have issues getting the noodles not to clump together and then just disintegrate.


    Without knowing exactly what you've got going on, a well seasoned wok, left to get screamin hot, then adding par cooked noodles, left in the wok to sear so they don't stick would be my first guess at probably incorrect advice.

    Not much better than some nicely wok seared, crunchy, chewy noodles with spicy sauce. I already bought warm tortillas for tacos tonight, or else I'd change gears and bust out the wok.
    We cannot be friends if you do not know the difference between Mayo and Miracle Whip.
  • Post #41 - September 5th, 2019, 4:48 pm
    Post #41 - September 5th, 2019, 4:48 pm Post #41 - September 5th, 2019, 4:48 pm
    Puckjam wrote:In Gary's chili oil recipe, he references the dried chili's to be hot and fresh. The fresh part is where I get lost. Do dried chili's lose something over time? Is there a "rule" as to when the dried peppers are best? Thanks.

    Good question. Think of my statement of hot and fresh dried chili like Rancho Gordo beans. The RG are dried but fresher with more flavor and don't need to be soaked before cooking like most grocery store beans. They are packed/sold closer to production and reflect that in flavor.

    If you put three or four types of crushed red chili on a counter, Spice House, Kalustyan's, grocery store, random Italian grocery you will notice a difference in moisture level, flexibility/brittleness, aroma and flavor. Locally I tend to have good luck with the Spice House.
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #42 - September 8th, 2019, 1:13 pm
    Post #42 - September 8th, 2019, 1:13 pm Post #42 - September 8th, 2019, 1:13 pm
    Gary,

    Have you tried the gorgeous chiles from Ma La Market?

    Geo

    https://themalamarket.com/
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #43 - September 9th, 2019, 7:46 am
    Post #43 - September 9th, 2019, 7:46 am Post #43 - September 9th, 2019, 7:46 am
    Geo wrote:Have you tried the gorgeous chiles from Ma La Market?
    No, between The Spice House, Asian groceries on Argyle and the giant packed to the gills Park to Shop just off Chinatown I've felt no need. Though I am tempted by Ma La Market's 3-Year Pixian Chili Bean Paste (Yi Feng He Hao Doubanjiang).

    You obviously like Ma La's products, what have you bought?
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #44 - October 7th, 2019, 12:29 am
    Post #44 - October 7th, 2019, 12:29 am Post #44 - October 7th, 2019, 12:29 am
    Pan fried noodles with shrimp stir-fry = dinner.

    NoodlePanFried3.jpg Pan fried noodles.

    NoodlePanFried5.jpg Pan fried noodles with shrimp stir-fry


    Pan fried noodles, count me a Fan!
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #45 - November 2nd, 2019, 6:14 pm
    Post #45 - November 2nd, 2019, 6:14 pm Post #45 - November 2nd, 2019, 6:14 pm
    IMG_1008.jpg pad see ew


    We got some really nice, fresh rice noodles at the new Talard Thai Market and made a great batch of Pad See Ew.
  • Post #46 - November 18th, 2020, 10:38 pm
    Post #46 - November 18th, 2020, 10:38 pm Post #46 - November 18th, 2020, 10:38 pm
    HI,

    I have attempted Chow Fun perhaps a half dozen times, but this time I came closer than before to a result I really liked. I largely followed Dry-Fried Chow Fun with Chinese Broccoli Recipe.

    I managed a good sear on the Chinese broccoli and onions. I think I needed to be more patient with the noodles to obtain the crispness I adore.

    The noodles I bought did have some corn oil on them, which helped in separating as well as browning. Previously, I had sourced my noodles at Asian bakeries which had no oil and were difficult to separate while cooking. These noodles by Harvester Foods were labeled as 'Stir fry noodle, Bahn Pho.' At least for me, I felt I had a much improved outcome.

    While these noodles were purchased at 88 Marketplace, they are likely available elsewhere.

    Harvester Foods
    2411 South Archer Avenue Chicago, IL 60616
    (312) 912-8813

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #47 - March 2nd, 2021, 5:08 am
    Post #47 - March 2nd, 2021, 5:08 am Post #47 - March 2nd, 2021, 5:08 am
    On average, I make Chow Fun about every two weeks. I am finally getting the hang of it, even if not as crisp as I may prefer.

    I got my toe dipped by making Chinese Brocolli Chow Fun, then I made Char Siu Chow Fun. I finally did my favorite of Beef Chow Fun.

    I had some chuck, so I velveted it. I began by cutting into 1x1.5 inch xwhatever-length to freeze for an hour. I sliced them about 0.25 inches, then tossed in a marinade of one rounded teaspoon baking soda and 3 tablespoons water per pound. I let it sit in the refrigerator for about two hours. Afterwards, I drained and rinsed.

    I then mixed the beef with a marinade of soy, oyster sauce, shaoxing wine, oil and cornstarch. This sat for 15-30 minutes.

    I slivered two small bok choy, sliced a medium onion pole-to-pole, and two bunches green onions in one inch pieces. I cut the rice noodles into one-inch widths.

    I made a sauce with turmeric, shaoxing wine, oyster sauce, soy sauce, fermented black beans, a touch of sugar and sesame oil. When I first started making Chow Fun, I used SeriousEats combo of oyster sauce and black bean paste. I found this other sauce when I made Char Siu Chow Fun.

    When it was time to cook, I found the method by SeriousEats to my liking: Heat up a 12-inch pan add maybe a tablespoon of oil, then drop in to the bok choy. Leave it for a minute or so to char, then stir around. Remove to a plate, then add more oil and the onions to cook to char a bit. Remove to a plate, then a little oil with the beef to brown, partially cook. and remove.

    Add a few tablespoons of oil, then added the Chow Fun noodles. I let them sit for a minute or so. Gently move and use your spoon to gently unfold and separate. These will eventually unwind, it is not a fast process. It took at least five minutes to be warmed through and separated.

    Once the noodles are ready, I returned the beef, onions and bok choy plus the green onions. I then began stirring in the sauce. By this time, the Chow Fun are less fragile, though my goal is to keep them intact. I love these noodles.

    Of course, what does my Dad do to his portion? He took a knife to slice everything into smaller pieces!

    I am finally getting to the point, I may not be ordering this in a restaurant anymore. Why? I can do it myself!

    Image
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #48 - March 2nd, 2021, 4:58 pm
    Post #48 - March 2nd, 2021, 4:58 pm Post #48 - March 2nd, 2021, 4:58 pm
    Looks great.

    Where do you get your very wide noodles. I am generally confined to medium wide noodles.
  • Post #49 - March 2nd, 2021, 5:28 pm
    Post #49 - March 2nd, 2021, 5:28 pm Post #49 - March 2nd, 2021, 5:28 pm
    lougord99 wrote:Looks great.

    Where do you get your very wide noodles. I am generally confined to medium wide noodles.

    I buy rice noodles in uncut sheets that are folded over at 88 Market, then cut the widths I want. I have bought these at Chinese bakeries, too.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #50 - March 3rd, 2021, 10:03 am
    Post #50 - March 3rd, 2021, 10:03 am Post #50 - March 3rd, 2021, 10:03 am
    Wow C2--those look terrific! And chow fun with char siu is a great idea :idea:
  • Post #51 - March 3rd, 2021, 2:14 pm
    Post #51 - March 3rd, 2021, 2:14 pm Post #51 - March 3rd, 2021, 2:14 pm
    thaiobsessed wrote:Wow C2--those look terrific! And chow fun with char siu is a great idea :idea:

    Necessity is the mother of invention, I made a batch I did not like too much. Making it with Chow Fun got rid of it in one swoop and made it more than tolerable!

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #52 - March 7th, 2021, 1:01 pm
    Post #52 - March 7th, 2021, 1:01 pm Post #52 - March 7th, 2021, 1:01 pm
    Result!
    Joong Boo Glenview dues indeed have chow fun in tidy 1lb packages, near the tofu in the produce section.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #53 - April 26th, 2021, 10:32 am
    Post #53 - April 26th, 2021, 10:32 am Post #53 - April 26th, 2021, 10:32 am
    Hi,

    Yesterday I was not home, so my family orders Chinese. One of the dishes was Beef Chow Fun. Earlier in the week, I had made Pork Chow Fun with bok choy and asparagus stems.

    When I came home, everyone was asleep. I heated up some of this beef chow fun. My production was better than what they ordered. This morning I learned my Dad was of the same opinion.

    I velveted the pork used in this week's chow fun. I made a batch of beef chow fun with beef I velveted recently, too. This really is a great method, especially with tough meat like chuck.

    I have seen methods for velveting fish, shrimp and chicken. Just because someone asked: you can velvet tofu, too, and even mushrooms!

    On the down side, I am less likely to order restaurant chow fun anymore.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #54 - April 26th, 2021, 11:52 am
    Post #54 - April 26th, 2021, 11:52 am Post #54 - April 26th, 2021, 11:52 am
    Cathy2 wrote:On the down side, I am less likely to order restaurant chow fun anymore.

    This and probably dozens of other dishes, too. If you've spent any time cooking during during the pandemic -- and I know you have -- I think you'll find that a lot of restaurant dishes no longer scratch the itch. There are a number of reasons for this but learning how to cook dishes you traditionally loved at restaurants can be a blessing and a curse.

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #55 - April 26th, 2021, 4:02 pm
    Post #55 - April 26th, 2021, 4:02 pm Post #55 - April 26th, 2021, 4:02 pm
    Jennie gets somewhat upset that we cannot even go out for a great hamburger anymore since I grind my own and they are better than what we get out.
  • Post #56 - April 26th, 2021, 8:40 pm
    Post #56 - April 26th, 2021, 8:40 pm Post #56 - April 26th, 2021, 8:40 pm
    lougord99 wrote:Jennie gets somewhat upset that we cannot even go out for a great hamburger anymore since I grind my own and they are better than what we get out.

    Sometimes our skills come back to bite us on the butt!
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #57 - April 26th, 2021, 11:55 pm
    Post #57 - April 26th, 2021, 11:55 pm Post #57 - April 26th, 2021, 11:55 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:On the down side, I am less likely to order restaurant chow fun anymore.

    As good as my cooked at home crispy chow fun may be, and its pretty damn good, Sun Wah's is better/best. Not in small part as they make the chow fun in-house.

    Tonight's dinner, Burgers, , burrata and crispy chow fun.

    Click to enlarge
    Image
    Image
    Image
    Image

    Crispy chow fun, count me a Fan!
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #58 - April 27th, 2021, 7:48 am
    Post #58 - April 27th, 2021, 7:48 am Post #58 - April 27th, 2021, 7:48 am
    HI,

    The noodle is called: har fun. Chow fun means stir fried har fun noodles. All this learned in the last week.

    I have thought about making the noodles, too. I may do it just to see what the process is like. If I lived in a rural area, I would have learned by now.

    Sun Wah might be one of the few places I would consider ordering Chow Fun. Crispy is more important to you than to me. I can get them crisp, though once I add the sauce, then crispy element fades fast. I like the whole composition.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #59 - May 2nd, 2021, 7:05 am
    Post #59 - May 2nd, 2021, 7:05 am Post #59 - May 2nd, 2021, 7:05 am
    Cathy2 wrote:HI,

    The noodle is called: har fun. Chow fun means stir fried har fun noodles. All this learned in the last week.


    So glad to know that! We made a batch this week too. GWiv--I must be channeling you because we made Oklahoma onion burgers recently too (though not as part of the same meal as the chow fun).

    Image

    Image
  • Post #60 - May 2nd, 2021, 8:50 am
    Post #60 - May 2nd, 2021, 8:50 am Post #60 - May 2nd, 2021, 8:50 am
    thaiobsessed wrote:made Oklahoma onion burgers recently too (though not as part of the same meal as the chow fun).

    Chow fun looks great, Oklahoma onion burger with pickled jalapeno, glorious!

    Pickled jalapeno for the Win!
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow

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