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Exploring a cookbook, "Momofuku", by David Chang

Exploring a cookbook, "Momofuku", by David Chang
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  • Post #31 - February 18th, 2012, 7:17 pm
    Post #31 - February 18th, 2012, 7:17 pm Post #31 - February 18th, 2012, 7:17 pm
    This was an outstanding meal. It is extremely easy to make. Super H-mart indeed had the Ssamjang and Kimchi ( which I got with oysters since David Chang has shucked oysters as a side ). The recipe sounds like, 'why should you bother' but it is just one of those things that works.
  • Post #32 - February 18th, 2012, 11:26 pm
    Post #32 - February 18th, 2012, 11:26 pm Post #32 - February 18th, 2012, 11:26 pm
    For those that made the bo ssam, can someone please speak to the weight of pork used and the number of servings that it provided? Thanks!
  • Post #33 - February 19th, 2012, 1:31 pm
    Post #33 - February 19th, 2012, 1:31 pm Post #33 - February 19th, 2012, 1:31 pm
    Hi,

    I have made this twice with pork shoulders/butt I have had on hand. Both were in the 3-4 pound range.

    The time spent cooking it, which was at least four to six hours for these small pieces. I plan to go for an eight pound or more pork butt next time. This is like ham, where you find yourself picking at it later. You can freeze the leftovers to incorporate into future dishes.

    For the Mardi Gras program yesterday, I slow cooked the pork on Friday until it was done. On Saturday, I reheated the pork at 300 degrees for about 25 minutes. My pan was already pretty dry, I added some water and tented the pork to avoid drying it out. I pulled it out, adjusted heat to 500 degrees, rubbed the brown sugar and blasted for 10 minutes or more.

    As for serving, I thought this response related to BBQ pulled pork sandwiches: "Most folks figure 1/4 to 1/3 pound of cooked meat. I lean towards that 1/3 pound since I like a generous sandwich . So, for 30 people at 1/3 lb per serving is 10 lbs of cooked meat. A 50% yield is pretty typical for pork butts, so that means 20 lbs of raw weight. Unless you can find big butts, I would cook three 8 pounders and have leftovers."

    I would go on the generous, because this pork dish really resonates with people. When you read this lump of meat was served at the end of a filling meal, yet people dug in with a hungry zest. You may find whatever you serve, it may not be enough.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #34 - February 19th, 2012, 1:58 pm
    Post #34 - February 19th, 2012, 1:58 pm Post #34 - February 19th, 2012, 1:58 pm
    I used a 10-pound pork shoulder. I cooked it for seven hours. Towards the last hour I lowered the heat from 350 to 325, and added a little water to the bottom of the pan to keep the sugars in the dry rub from burning.

    I served it for five people who, I be.ieve, ate way more than 1/3 pound per person. We had plenty left over. So, I would say the meat I had would have served 10-12 people.
    Jyoti
    A meal, with bread and wine, shared with friends and family is among the most essential and important of all human rituals.
    Ruhlman
  • Post #35 - February 25th, 2012, 6:52 pm
    Post #35 - February 25th, 2012, 6:52 pm Post #35 - February 25th, 2012, 6:52 pm
    This meal is just as good with pork that had been chunked, frozen and reheated in foil with a little water to keep it moist.
  • Post #36 - April 11th, 2012, 6:56 am
    Post #36 - April 11th, 2012, 6:56 am Post #36 - April 11th, 2012, 6:56 am
    Gearing up to cook the bo scam this weekend, and really appreciate all the tips in this thread. I have a related question: has anyone served vegetable side dishes, most likely from the Momofuku book, that paired especially nicely with the pork? I plan to do the recommended lettuce, ginger scallion sauce, ssamjang, rice, and some of his pickles, but would like to round out the offerings with a nice preparation of cauliflower or carrots or red cabbage or something? Thanks as always.
  • Post #37 - April 11th, 2012, 7:27 am
    Post #37 - April 11th, 2012, 7:27 am Post #37 - April 11th, 2012, 7:27 am
    annak wrote:Gearing up to cook the bo scam this weekend, and really appreciate all the tips in this thread. I have a related question: has anyone served vegetable side dishes, most likely from the Momofuku book, that paired especially nicely with the pork? I plan to do the recommended lettuce, ginger scallion sauce, ssamjang, rice, and some of his pickles, but would like to round out the offerings with a nice preparation of cauliflower or carrots or red cabbage or something? Thanks as always.


    I served it with rice, lettuce, pickles, kimchee, and a daikon and carrot slaw. There did not appear to be a need for anything else. I should add that I served a miso soup while we were waiting for the pork to finish cooking. Enjoy your weekend dinner.
    Jyoti
    A meal, with bread and wine, shared with friends and family is among the most essential and important of all human rituals.
    Ruhlman
  • Post #38 - April 11th, 2012, 7:33 am
    Post #38 - April 11th, 2012, 7:33 am Post #38 - April 11th, 2012, 7:33 am
    We did a bunch of banchan--sesame spinach, scallion salad, potato salad, jade tofu, pickled daikon and carrot, kimchi and the like. It seemed like the perfect accompaniment and most only took minutes to make. In particular, the greens and the scallion salad were both delicious and very pretty next to the pickles and kimchi. The pork is so rich that the tang of these sides provided a nice balance that I'm not sure a prepared veg dish would.
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #39 - April 16th, 2012, 8:11 am
    Post #39 - April 16th, 2012, 8:11 am Post #39 - April 16th, 2012, 8:11 am
    After picking up a beautiful shoulder from Butcher & Larder, we enjoyed a tremendous feast. We served the ginger scallion sauce and ssamjang sauce and cucumber quick pickles, adding Chang's mustard sauce and his pickled shitakes (both of which we liked), Cathy2's recommended roasted garlic, and, following Boudreaulicious's idea, a slaw of red cabbage, napa cabbage, carrot, daikon, and spiced cashews (with lime ginger sesame vin). This was just so tasty and so much fun! A note on size, since variations have been discussed: we got a shoulder of about 6.75 lbs, which was bone-in (as recipe says) and skin on (which isn't specified one way or the other in recipe). The size shrinkage over the 5 hours of cook time (we adjusted by ratio from the 6 hours for 8-10lbs; and checked with a thermometer) was substantial; four adults ate very well with only a little pork leftover.
  • Post #40 - September 24th, 2013, 8:19 am
    Post #40 - September 24th, 2013, 8:19 am Post #40 - September 24th, 2013, 8:19 am
    HI,

    David Chang is hiring for the Momofuku culinary lab, just send your CV to resume@momofuku.com ... what the heck!

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #41 - September 24th, 2013, 2:25 pm
    Post #41 - September 24th, 2013, 2:25 pm Post #41 - September 24th, 2013, 2:25 pm
    MrBarossa wrote:
    The pork buns recipe is stupid simple and absolutely delicious. I highly recommend starting there. I made the buns from scratch, which is was surprisingly easy, if a bit time consuming. In any event, David Chang strongly encourages people to just buy the buns. If you do that, I'm pretty sure you can't go wrong and you'll have a real crowd pleaser on your hands.


    I finally got a hold of the book. It is a bit of the beast, but I was intrigued by the buns. I think I will give them a try this weekend. Kenji Alt-Lopez had a great recipe for tempura King Mushrooms, part of this year's Vegan Experiment, in steamed buns. And I think that would be perfect in homemade buns.
    Ava-"If you get down and out, just get in the kitchen and bake a cake."- Jean Strickland

    Horto In Urbs- Falling in love with Urban Vegetable Gardening
  • Post #42 - April 25th, 2017, 10:10 pm
    Post #42 - April 25th, 2017, 10:10 pm Post #42 - April 25th, 2017, 10:10 pm
    Hi,

    At 4:30 am, my Dad commenced cooking our latest Bo Ssam. I cooked it at 250 degrees until it was about to collapse around 2:00 pm.

    I took the meat out of the oven, then raised the temperature to 500 degrees.

    The most favored part of Bo Ssam is the pork candy from the brown sugar crust. To increase the surface area I slid the shoulder bone out of the roast, then started to gently flatten and spread out the roast. Since it was as tender as any pulled pork, this was easy.

    I spread brown sugar over the surface, then returned the roast to the oven for 10-15 minutes until it caramelized.

    If crunchy, salty-sweet is your thing, then you may want to try this yourself.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #43 - April 26th, 2017, 7:33 am
    Post #43 - April 26th, 2017, 7:33 am Post #43 - April 26th, 2017, 7:33 am
    Cathy2 wrote:Hi,

    At 4:30 am, my Dad commenced cooking our latest Bo Ssam. I cooked it at 250 degrees until it was about to collapse around 2:00 pm.

    I took the meat out of the oven, then raised the temperature to 500 degrees.

    The most favored part of Bo Ssam is the pork candy from the brown sugar crust. To increase the surface area I slid the shoulder bone out of the roast, then started to gently flatten and spread out the roast. Since it was as tender as any pulled pork, this was easy.

    I spread brown sugar over the surface, then returned the roast to the oven for 10-15 minutes until it caramelized.

    If crunchy, salty-sweet is your thing, then you may want to try this yourself.

    Regards,
    Cathy2


    This is my favorite item in this cookbook. Simple and a huge crowd pleaser. And the ssam sauce is surprisingly great too.
  • Post #44 - April 27th, 2017, 4:39 pm
    Post #44 - April 27th, 2017, 4:39 pm Post #44 - April 27th, 2017, 4:39 pm
    WhyBeeSea wrote:This is my favorite item in this cookbook. Simple and a huge crowd pleaser. And the ssam sauce is surprisingly great too.

    Agreed.

    I also add garlic cloves from three or four heads of garlic to cook in the pork fat. I find this easier to handle and eat than the sliced off tops of whole garlic cloves.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #45 - September 3rd, 2021, 1:58 pm
    Post #45 - September 3rd, 2021, 1:58 pm Post #45 - September 3rd, 2021, 1:58 pm
    Momofuku is getting in on the $47 billion instant noodle market after a rough 2020. The CEO broke down how the restaurant group is transforming its business model for a post-pandemic world. https://www.businessinsider.com/momofuk ... ams-2021-8
    Never order barbecue in a place that also serves quiche - Lewis Grizzard
  • Post #46 - November 13th, 2021, 9:55 pm
    Post #46 - November 13th, 2021, 9:55 pm Post #46 - November 13th, 2021, 9:55 pm
    A variation of Bo Ssam to try sometime ...

    Roast Turkey Breast Ssam With Squash Ssamjang and Jujube Date Relish Recipe

    Celebrate the Sides With a Korean-American Banchan Thanksgiving
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast

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