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  • Post #181 - July 6th, 2019, 10:59 am
    Post #181 - July 6th, 2019, 10:59 am Post #181 - July 6th, 2019, 10:59 am
    NFriday wrote:Evanston does not have peppers yet because they are not in season.
    ... The first week maybe the pickings were slim at the Evanston market because everything was late, but when I went two weeks ago, I spent $30 there. ... Peppers are going to be in season in 2-3 weeks, and the same with tomatoes.
    My complaint wasn't directed at the market's offerings in May, or even early June necessarily. Peppers have been available by mid-June in most years.

    I was there this morning ~9:20-9:40am. The selection was a little better, but the only peppers were small green bell peppers at Nichols, which didn't look very good. The Romaine offerings were pretty slim. Nichols had none, Henry's offering was worse than last week were it was 2 for $5 on decent size heads, it was $3/per, smaller, no deal for multiples. No one else had Romaine.

    As stated by Nancy, spinach is at it's end w/ places stating it was the last week of it (Nichols, and 1 other IIRC). I thought of trying Nichols's Spigarello to compare w/ rapini, but went with an Italian spinach at Green Acres (mostly organic vendor), whose season might last longer than other spinach. Thai basil looked like Green Acres' best deal at $3/bag, but I still have some from Fresh Farms. Next week. If the heirlooms sold by Nichols are indoor grown, so be it. They were in good shape at $4/lbs.

    I don't buy fruit really (been ordering peaches from "http://www.thepeachtruck.com", my god, so damn good!), but the sample strawberries of Lyons Fruit Farm were phenomenal. Carrots still only available at incredibly inflated prices; IMO 5x's supermarket price is too much to give in to.
  • Post #182 - July 6th, 2019, 12:40 pm
    Post #182 - July 6th, 2019, 12:40 pm Post #182 - July 6th, 2019, 12:40 pm
    I got a dozen eggs today from Jon First for $2 because the eggs somehow got frozen, and one of them was cracked. All the rest of his eggs were $5 a dozen. I also bought 2 quarts of strawberries for $7 from Jon and a pint of blueberries and a pint of cherries for $7 total too. While I was paying for those somebody asked me if I was interested in the eggs.

    They had some romaine at Green Acres for $3 a bag. They had a special on cauliflower and broccoli for $2 a small bag, and so I got that instead, and I also got a half pound of sugar snap peas from Nichols

    I got a bunch of swiss chard from Henry, but all of his lettuce was sold out. I saw a sign for 2/$5 lettuce, but all they had left was arugula. Henry has had a rough year this year. It rained almost every day in May and so he was late replanting his lettuce and most everything else, and then the beginning of June he got a really bad hail storm, which damaged most of his lettuce. His heads are smaller right now because he has had to remove at least the top two bunches of lettuce leaves from his lettuce because of the hale damage. What would normally be extra large heads, are now only medium heads.

    You should really go to Henry's Farm and sign up for the email his Sister Terra sends out on late Thursday evenings. She mentions what has been going on at the farm that week, and she also mentions what Henry is bringing that week, and she includes recipes. This week she had recipes for swiss chard. Hope this helps, Nancy
  • Post #183 - July 6th, 2019, 1:17 pm
    Post #183 - July 6th, 2019, 1:17 pm Post #183 - July 6th, 2019, 1:17 pm
    NFriday wrote:I got a dozen eggs today from Jon First ...
    They had some romaine at Green Acres for $3 a bag. ...
    I got a bunch of swiss chard from Henry, but all of his lettuce was sold out. I saw a sign for 2/$5 lettuce, but all they had left was arugula. ...
    You should really go to Henry's Farm and sign up for the email his Sister Terra sends out on late Thursday evenings. She mentions what has been going on at the farm that week, and she also mentions what Henry is bringing that week, and she includes recipes.
    -When you say "John First" I assume it is the owner of 1st Orchards in the SW corner. For whatever reason (I guess saving characters helps in the digital age) he downplays the naming. If he runs a different stand, please let me know what he DBA.
    - Shame on me for not noticing Romaine at GA. I'd gone through their stuff my first trip around, thought I checked again when redoubling in a search for Romaine.
    - The 2 for $5 only applied to arugula, even when other stuff was present. The sign wasn't prominent and tight to the corner of the arugula shelf. I asked a staffer directly, and she said it was arugula-only, unlike last week.
    - It's probably a good idea to get on the email list, thanks. If for no other reason, recipes that utilize these greens are always welcome.
  • Post #184 - July 6th, 2019, 1:34 pm
    Post #184 - July 6th, 2019, 1:34 pm Post #184 - July 6th, 2019, 1:34 pm
    You can sign up for the newsletter at http://www.brockmanfamilyfarming.com

    They also have a fairly active Facebook page where they share pictures of what's being harvested.
    "I live on good soup, not on fine words." -Moliere
  • Post #185 - July 6th, 2019, 2:50 pm
    Post #185 - July 6th, 2019, 2:50 pm Post #185 - July 6th, 2019, 2:50 pm
    Hi- Jon First is 1st Orchards. He is a good friend of my Sister that took over the farm when my Father died 30 years ago. I usually get to the market when they are winding down. You can get some really good deals then. Jon used to have a bag sale at the end of the day for $5 a bag for what ever he had left. He used to have heirloom tomatoes marked down to 3/$1 too. He still marks some of his stuff down at the end of the day like he did today with the fruit, but he quit the bag sales when Hillside food pantry started doing pick ups there. He donates more stuff than any other farmer there. He donates all of the asparagus he has left, and I am sure he donated the rest of the strawberries he had left today, although he sold the great majority of them. He also donates all of the tomatoes he has left. Hillside makes it really easy for farmers to donate. They go stall to stall and provide bins for the donated produce to go into. They usually show up around 12:30.

    One of the organic growers it starts with a K Kennibeck or something like that, has mixed lettuce in bags for $3. They keep it in a cooler and so it is always in good condition. I'll buy lettuce from them if Henry is out. I also buy heirloom tomatoes from them starting in August. If you go there after 12:00, they usually mark them down to $1 a pound. By then they have been picked over, and so you have to use them up in a day or two, but they are really good.
  • Post #186 - July 6th, 2019, 4:30 pm
    Post #186 - July 6th, 2019, 4:30 pm Post #186 - July 6th, 2019, 4:30 pm
    bw77 wrote:You can sign up for the newsletter at http://www.brockmanfamilyfarming.com
    Thanks. The link to Henry's on the EFM website's vendor list is nonfunctional. Ironically, because they have recipes on the website, I might not need emails as much.
    NFriday wrote:Jon First is 1st Orchards. ... I usually get to the market when they are winding down. You can get some really good deals then.

    One of the organic growers it starts with a K Kennibeck
    Thanks for confirming. Deals at closing is the smartest, most opportunistic approach, but I get burned b/c things I really want, like criminis at River Valley are sold out.

    Must've been Kinnikinnick. I usually associate them with meats & eggs. I'll have to keep an eye on greens now.
  • Post #187 - July 6th, 2019, 5:35 pm
    Post #187 - July 6th, 2019, 5:35 pm Post #187 - July 6th, 2019, 5:35 pm
    bw77 wrote:You can sign up for the newsletter at http://www.brockmanfamilyfarming.com
    Thanks. The link to Henry's on the EFM website's vendor list is nonfunctional. Ironically, because they have recipes on the website, I might not need emails as much.

    The Facebook page is under Henry's Farm rather than Brockman Farm. They got so much rain in May, it shows them planting rice.
    "I live on good soup, not on fine words." -Moliere
  • Post #188 - July 10th, 2019, 2:52 pm
    Post #188 - July 10th, 2019, 2:52 pm Post #188 - July 10th, 2019, 2:52 pm
    Hi- Can anybody tell me if the farmer's market at the Evanston YMCA is taking place again this summer. I tried looking it up on the friends of the Evanston farmer's market site, but it is not listed. Ridgeville is listed for Wednesdays. Thanks, Nancy
  • Post #189 - July 10th, 2019, 3:03 pm
    Post #189 - July 10th, 2019, 3:03 pm Post #189 - July 10th, 2019, 3:03 pm
    I asked several strawberry farmers last Saturday, and they told me that they won't have nearly as many strawberries this Saturday at Evanston. The hot weather kind of did them in. They should still have cherries and lots of blueberries, and hopefully some apricots. I am not sure how large the Michigan apricot crop is though due to the polar vortex, Hopefully corn will be coming either this Saturday or the following Saturday due to all of the hot weather we have been having. Henry even had a few tomatoes for his first 10 customers last Saturday,

    Yes there is a chance that the market will be out of some of the stuff you want if you show up late, but when I show up at 11:30, River Valley Ranch always has crimini. I usually don't buy it in the summertime though, because I can get it at the winter market all winter.

    Due to the hot weather lettuce should be harder to come by this Saturday, and so if you want any get there before 9:00. Hope this helps, Nancy
  • Post #190 - August 16th, 2019, 10:46 pm
    Post #190 - August 16th, 2019, 10:46 pm Post #190 - August 16th, 2019, 10:46 pm
    Hi- I just received an email from Henry that his truck is loaded to the brim for tomorrow's market. He is bring the first of his melons, and lots of tomatoes. I have had his melons before, and they are really good. I bought a bag of lettuce from Henry around noon last Saturday, and he still had tons left. It is going to be a few more weeks though before he has any more lettuce. He is lucky that his melons came out okay. He could not direct seed them back in May because the ground was too muddy, and so he had to start some transplants, and transplant them after the ground dried out. He is also having a special on basil tomorrow. $3 a bunch or 3 bunches for $7.

    The last two weeks I bought tomatoes from Jon First when he marked them down to 3/$1. The first week I only got conventional tomatoes, and they were only fair, but last week I found some smaller heirlooms that were much better.

    I bought a quart of Michigan peaches from Seedlings last week that were okay. Apparently they had a few they were able to pick off of their farm. Two weeks ago I bought a quart of bruised apricots from Keningshof's that I was only charged $3 for that were really good. They got them from a farm North of Grand Rapids that did not get as cold. One of my friends was with me, and it took some talking to convince her to buy the second quart of apricots. She saw the sign that they were bruised, and decided she did not want them, but did not want to pay $7 a pint for the other ones. after she got them home, she told me that they were really good. Some were bruised, and some were ripe, and some had scars on them. Corn should be plentiful tomorrow. I usually get my corn from 1st Orchards or Nichols. They botgh have excellent corn. Hope this helps, Nancy
  • Post #191 - September 10th, 2019, 2:28 pm
    Post #191 - September 10th, 2019, 2:28 pm Post #191 - September 10th, 2019, 2:28 pm
    Having trouble viewing this email? View it as a Web page.

    ________________________________________
    For Immediate Release
    September 10, 2019
    Media Contact: Jessie Mayo jmayo@cityofevanston.org
    Phone: 847-448-8041
    EVANSTON, IL - Community members are invited to support and celebrate the continued success of the Downtown Evanston Farmers’ Market at the annual Truck to Table community celebration and benefit on Saturday, September 21, 10 a.m. to noon, at the Market.
    The family-friendly outdoor event will partner top local chefs with prominent Midwest sustainable growers to create small plates celebrating the bounty of local produce available at the Market. Tickets may be purchased in advance at the Market at the City of Evanston tent or online at cityofevanston.org/rectickets. Admission is $35 for seven chef-table tickets in advance, or $6 per chef-table ticket on the day of the event.
    Among the chefs volunteering their time this year are those from Kinship, Koi, Feast and Imbibe, Chef's Station, Gigio's, Edzo's, Gotta B Crepes, River Valley Kitchen, Sweety Pies Bakery, NaKorn, Baked Cheese Haus, and Found Kitchen & Social House. Chef Brian Huston is also participating.
    Proceeds from the event will benefit the Market’s outreach and educational programming, including the children’s “Spud Club” and the SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program) matching program. Residents who support "eating local” and want to ensure the continued success of the Downtown Evanston Farmers’ Market should reserve tickets now.
    The event is presented by the City of Evanston’s Parks, Recreation and Community Services Department and sponsored by Hilton Garden Inn and Dale Bradley.
    The Downtown Evanston Farmers' Market, which is held on Saturdays from early May to early November at 1800 Maple Ave., was voted "Best Chicago
    Suburban Farmers’ Market" in 2018 by Make It Better readers.
    For more information, please visit cityofevanston.org/market or call/text 847-448-4311 For convenience, you may dial 311 directly while in Evanston.
    -END-
    "I live on good soup, not on fine words." -Moliere
  • Post #192 - September 19th, 2019, 10:52 pm
    Post #192 - September 19th, 2019, 10:52 pm Post #192 - September 19th, 2019, 10:52 pm
    Hi- I just got the email from Terra about what Henry is bringing to market this Saturday. Henry got a late start in planting his tomato transplants due to all the rain he received in May, and so he did not have a lot of tomatoes in August like he usually does, but he says that they are going gangbusters right now, and he will have the largest tomato crop he has ever had in 26 years of farming. He will have bulk specials for those people that can use at least a peck. Last week, I noticed that everybody had lots of tomatoes, and Nichols had 5 pounds for $10. I and a friend of mine went in together and got over six pounds of organic tomatoes for $1.50 a pound from Kennibek. They were getting ready to pack up though. They were $3 most of the morning.

    Jon First told me last week that he was not going to have any more corn. Nichols should still have corn this Saturday, but the quality is not as good this time of year as it is in August. I asked Linda Koeningshof if she was going to have any more Michigan peaches this year, and she said she did not know. The ones I got from her two weeks ago were really good. Last Saturday she only had ones from New Jersey though, and so I passed.

    Henry did not mention whether he was going to have any more soybeans this Saturday. I love his soybeans. I stick them in the microwave for three minutes with a little water. Last Saturday Henry still had some mesclun at 12:00, which I was surprised. He did not mention it in his email though. When I forwarded Henry's email to my friend last week, I asked her if she read it, and she said she glanced at it, but it was all about tomatoes, and so she did not read much of it. Hope this helps, Nancy
  • Post #193 - September 20th, 2019, 3:17 pm
    Post #193 - September 20th, 2019, 3:17 pm Post #193 - September 20th, 2019, 3:17 pm
    I just received another email from Henry, and for those people who can use lots of tomatoes, he is throwing in a peck of tomatoes for free if you buy a half bushel. For those people like me that cannot use that many tomatoes, he is having a deal on smaller amounts. If you buy two pounds of tomatoes, you get an additional pound for free. If you buy 10 pounds of tomatoes, you get an additional five pounds for free, and so essentially it is buy two get one for free. This is for all of his tomatoes including his seconds. For those people that want to buy large quantities of seconds, Henry asks that you order them by 7:00pm tonight. Henry is going to have a full truck this week, and so he is not bringing up all of his seconds.

    Henry is also bringing up a new item called Chinese stem mustard. I looked it up, and it can tolerate temperatures down to 6 degrees F!. That means you could pick it in December. Henry is also bringing a lot of radicchio. Does anybody here use it for salads?
  • Post #194 - September 21st, 2019, 1:23 pm
    Post #194 - September 21st, 2019, 1:23 pm Post #194 - September 21st, 2019, 1:23 pm
    I walked through the Evanston Farmers Market today and was impressed by the foot traffic this market achieves (even with the slight rain). The price point on basically most if not all items I witnessed was even above Whole Foods prices (ie $6- $8 for a pint of strawberry's, raspberries). Also the special chefs tasting food festival items was at a price gauging rates at $6 per ticket for 1 tasting portion for each chef station.

    I know some see farmers markets helping local farmers instead of giving money to corporate farmers when buying at a grocery store but to charge gauging prices turns me off from these kind of food markets. Also I understand there is going to be some of the opinion about quality or freshness from farmers markets vs a grocery chain which some would say is why the premium price is charged. There is always going to be consumer/audience for any level of product/service and some will continue to buy their produce at these type of farmers markets and some wont.

    /polster
    Last edited by polster on September 21st, 2019, 7:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.
  • Post #195 - September 21st, 2019, 3:13 pm
    Post #195 - September 21st, 2019, 3:13 pm Post #195 - September 21st, 2019, 3:13 pm
    This is a pretty slap-dash assessment with cherry-picked data. I'll leave the quality/freshness/support of local farmers arguments aside. You cite expensive raspberries. There are pesticide-free heirloom tomatoes for $2/lb (or less depending on how much you buy). This is less expensive than Whole Foods and some other grocery stores I visit. Does that prove anything? Nope. Because each one of us has picked one item to report on.

    It's a farmer's market. There are plenty of reasons to shop there or not. But to characterize it as way more expensive than a grocery stores based on an item is just as silly as my characterizing it as cheap because of a different one. Overall, I think that products probably are more expensive than a typical grocery store. If you're shopping on price alone, it might not be a good choice for where to shop for produce. But I think there is plenty to buy that isn't necessarily expensive (especially if you like to buy in bulk).

    Oh, and the price-gauging food tickets are a one-time fundraiser for the market. I'm sure you can spend less on food elsewhere as well. But that's not really the point is it?

    Evanston remains one of the best farmer's markets in the area. I like it. I've been shopping there for over a decade and will continue to do so. I'm guessing I won't run into you there.
  • Post #196 - September 21st, 2019, 4:04 pm
    Post #196 - September 21st, 2019, 4:04 pm Post #196 - September 21st, 2019, 4:04 pm
    Hi- Yes some things are way more expensive, but I bought five pounds of heirloom tomatoes today from Nichols for $10. I spent $21 just at Nichols today. I bought 8 ears of corn, all of those tomatoes, a pound of soybeans, a muskmelon, and 10 huge red peppers which I got for $2. I cut them up and freeze them. I would have bought more peppers, but I still have some peppers that I bought from Jon First that I paid 2/$1 a few weeks ago that I have not dealt with yet.

    I have found that if you are flexible in what you buy, and get there after 11, you can get some good deals. This summer I got huge tomatoes 3/$1, and Jon First always has a bunch of veggies on sale for 3/$1 including green peppers and eggplant. He also had huge muskmelons for $1 for about a month. I got some organic heirloom tomatoes for $1.50 a pound last week, because I went in with a friend, and we bought over 6 pounds worth. Some growers will give you a good deal if you are willing to buy a ton of whatever. When I buy fresh basil to make pesto every year, I go to Jon First right before he is ready to go home, and offer to buy all of his basil he has left. Last year he sold me 11 bunches for $10.

    The people that complain about the prices usually are not flexible in what they buy. They have to buy lettuce and mushrooms every week instead of eating what is in season. Today deals were to be had in tomatoes and red peppers. There is usually only one or two people that bring everbearing strawberries, and they are always expensive there. In June strawberries are a lot cheaper. Raspberries are a pain to grow and pick, and they don't keep very well. I doubt you can find a pint of raspberries for less than $5 at Whole Foods. Their raspberries all come from California in 1/2 pint boxes. When I get to the market, I always make the rounds before I buy anything to see who has the best deals.

    Because of the polar vortex we had in January a lot of the fruit is in short supply. I did buy some Michigan peaches from Koeningshof's today, but they came from another section of Michigan that did not get as cold. Koeningshof's did not have any peaches this year on their farm. Peaches, apricots and nectarines got particularly hard hit this year. They do have 50 acres of raspberries on their farm though. Hope this helps, Nancy
  • Post #197 - September 23rd, 2019, 3:21 pm
    Post #197 - September 23rd, 2019, 3:21 pm Post #197 - September 23rd, 2019, 3:21 pm
    polster wrote:The price point on basically most if not all items I witnessed was even above Whole Foods prices (ie $6- $8 for a pint of strawberry's, raspberries). Also the special chefs tasting food festival items was at a price gauging rates at $6 per ticket for 1 tasting portion for each chef station.

    I know some see farmers markets helping local farmers instead of giving money to corporate farmers when buying at a grocery store but to charge gauging prices turns me off from these kind of food markets.
    I was there Sat too (every week), and the crowds were particularly strong despite the light rain (10.15ish). I could see dissatisfaction with the relatively high prices on some things. But as gastro gnome points out, it's easy to cherry-pick (no pun intended) examples for a criticism like this. 1st Orchards, or Jon First as Nancy describes them, is extremely reasonable. 3 for $1 poblanos, (lg) serranos and green bell peppers is below Jewel prices. Also 2/$1 red/yellow sweet peppers.

    I saw the chef's tastings being served at a couple vendors, but didn't look into the ticketing/prices. It was $6 per sample? That would be obnoxiously high, they looked the size of 2-3 bites per serving. But 1 from each for $6 doesn't sound bad at all.

    Finally, to describe it as gouging suggests something more exploitative than simply high prices. Wilmette's FM is open at the same time. This isn't even the quasi-gouging you see for concessions inside closed event atmospheres. EFM's prices simply reflect general market-rate prices, IMO. If I'm wrong, and Evanston is an outlier, let me know who sells the same stuff around here for less.
  • Post #198 - September 23rd, 2019, 4:06 pm
    Post #198 - September 23rd, 2019, 4:06 pm Post #198 - September 23rd, 2019, 4:06 pm
    its pretty common that people who focus on price do not have much sense or concern about quality. if you still need convincing that farmers market good are superior to marianos . . .
  • Post #199 - September 23rd, 2019, 5:49 pm
    Post #199 - September 23rd, 2019, 5:49 pm Post #199 - September 23rd, 2019, 5:49 pm
    #1 - I knew my post would trigger some people as I see it as kind of like having a rational discussion with religious folks on why one religion thinks they are better than any other religion (or non - religious folks).

    #2 - I see farmer markets useful for me if I am looking for some unique ingredient that is hard to find in most if not all local grocers.

    #3 - Another thing I noticed is not many signs claiming organic produce but charging organic high prices.  I did not ask the Evanston market vendors if there produce was organic or not, but in downtown which has a Thursday farmers market (not as large in depth and size as the Evanston market) there produce vendors from my questioning all said there offering are not organic (but very high in $$$ price point).

    I also agree with some of people above me who posted there are potential deals to be found by either going when the vendors are packing up for day or some individual items deals for a fair price.

    What my point was that a majority of the vendors items I saw were higher in price point than Whole Foods Organic Produce for the same 1 to 1 comparison.  For those who enjoy the farmers markets for the experience (ambiance) or quality than keep enjoying as my post is just my opinion and not something to be looked at in a negative or positive light. We all have opinions based on our experiences and view on life and I am sharing my singular point of view on this subject.
    Last edited by polster on September 23rd, 2019, 6:09 pm, edited 1 time in total.
  • Post #200 - September 23rd, 2019, 6:06 pm
    Post #200 - September 23rd, 2019, 6:06 pm Post #200 - September 23rd, 2019, 6:06 pm
    bweiny wrote:I saw the chef's tastings being served at a couple vendors, but didn't look into the ticketing/prices. It was $6 per sample? That would be obnoxiously high, they looked the size of 2-3 bites per serving. But 1 from each for $6 doesn't sound bad at all.


    Its in the post by bw77 above:
    Admission is $35 for seven chef-table tickets in advance, or $6 per chef-table ticket on the day of the event.
  • Post #201 - September 23rd, 2019, 6:19 pm
    Post #201 - September 23rd, 2019, 6:19 pm Post #201 - September 23rd, 2019, 6:19 pm
    polster wrote:
    bweiny wrote:I saw the chef's tastings being served at a couple vendors, but didn't look into the ticketing/prices. It was $6 per sample? That would be obnoxiously high, they looked the size of 2-3 bites per serving. But 1 from each for $6 doesn't sound bad at all.
    Its in the post by bw77 above:
    Admission is $35 for seven chef-table tickets in advance, or $6 per chef-table ticket on the day of the event.
    Thanks for clarifying. Yea, that would've been a rip-off if purchased on any type of portion/value criteria. One would have to have the mindset of donating half to charity and getting a taste of chef preps for $15-20.
  • Post #202 - September 23rd, 2019, 6:23 pm
    Post #202 - September 23rd, 2019, 6:23 pm Post #202 - September 23rd, 2019, 6:23 pm
    That event was a fund raiser and the chefs involved volunteered.
    Last edited by bw77 on September 24th, 2019, 10:25 am, edited 1 time in total.
    "I live on good soup, not on fine words." -Moliere
  • Post #203 - September 24th, 2019, 7:55 am
    Post #203 - September 24th, 2019, 7:55 am Post #203 - September 24th, 2019, 7:55 am
    For me its more about perceived value for price, thus my slow creeping general dissatisfaction with Farmer's Markets. Every time I pay $6 for a mealy heirloom tomato, $7 for a pint of hard plums or notice the number of prepared food vendors is starting to outstrip fresh produce I wince.

    I still go to both Evanston and Skokie Farmer's market, though Lincoln Park Green City left my rotation a decade ago, right about the time they stopped validating parking resulting in an extra $14 most Saturday visits.

    Call me a grouch or out-of-touch or dumb-ass or whatever you wish, it simply pisses me off to plate fifteen dollars of tasteless tomatoes regardless of provenance.

    On a positive note, I'm seldom disappointed by farmer's market herbs, eggs or corn. Though the bride grows more herbs than we are able to utilize.
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #204 - September 25th, 2019, 10:55 pm
    Post #204 - September 25th, 2019, 10:55 pm Post #204 - September 25th, 2019, 10:55 pm
    Hi- There are at least four certified organic growers selling at Evanston. Henry, Mint Creek, Kinnikinnick and Lake Breeze. Hewnry's Sister Teresa is also certified, but she does not come up every week anymore. She brings up bedding plants in the Spring, and comes up maybe 3 times the rest of the summer. She is coming this Saturday. There are also several growers who are organic, but not certified such as River Valley and Green Acres. This is because there is a lot of paper work involved if you want to be certified, and there is a hefty fee you must pay, and you have to be organic for three years before you can apply for certification. Nichols claims that some of their stuff is grown organically, but I have never gotten a straight answer from them about whether they use week killer such as Roundup. I know they limit the number of times they spray their apples with pesticides.

    The Chicago Tribune went to several local farmers markets once and bought local peaches, and also bought some shipped in peaches at several grocery stores. They then sent them to a lab to have them tested for pesticides, and they found that the peaches purchased at the farmers market, had 1/3rd less detectable pesticides than the the conventional shipped in peaches that were purchased at the grocery store.

    You can buy tomatoes for way less than $7 a pound at the Evanston market. Last Saturday Henry had the most expensive tomatoes, and his were $5 a pound, but if you bought 2 pounds, you got a third pound for free, and so $10 for three pounds of organic tomatoes. Kinnikinnick had all of their organic heirloom tomatoes for $3 a pound, and if you came there right before they closed and bought a lot of them, the farmer often sold them for 1/2 price. Nichols had heirloom tomatoes 5 pounds for $10 too. Skokie I believe only has a few farmers selling heirloom tomatoes, and those people charge a lot of money, and do not mark their stuff down at the end of the day. I much prefer Glenwood's Sunday market to Skokie's.

    I just find the farmer's market very relaxing, and you can ask the farmer what to do with whatever you are buying, and they often give out free samples. They often have stuff that you can't find in the grocery stores such as green soybeans and Japanese watermelons. I usually run into at least one friend there every week, and I enjoy talking to the farmers that I know, and they will tell me how much longer they are going to have something such as corn. Hope this helps, Nancy
  • Post #205 - September 26th, 2019, 11:50 am
    Post #205 - September 26th, 2019, 11:50 am Post #205 - September 26th, 2019, 11:50 am
    For what its worth, we bought a half peck of Henry's heirloom tomatoes last week. I am certain we could have gotten tomatoes for less elsewhere. I also think they are they are among the best tomatoes we have ever had and now we have them in great abundance and variety. Enjoying them tremendously.
    "I live on good soup, not on fine words." -Moliere
  • Post #206 - September 27th, 2019, 5:46 pm
    Post #206 - September 27th, 2019, 5:46 pm Post #206 - September 27th, 2019, 5:46 pm
    Hi- I just got an email from Henry, and he is having his amazing wall of lettuce again tomorrow. He is having a special on okra if you want to buy a peck or 1/2 bushel, He is also going to have some #2 potatoes for 1/2 price. He was out of them when I got there last week. They mostly just have a green spot on them which you can peel off.

    He is having a special again on tomatoes, but he is out of #2 heirloom tomatoes, but he has a few #2 beefsteaks left if you order by 7:00 this evening. He is running another buy two pounds get one pound for free, but it is only for the beefsteaks and romas, although he might have a few heirlooms on special tomorrow. He is also going to have a deal on 1/2 bushels and pecks of heirlooms, romas and beefsteaks. It sounds like this is going to be the last week he is going to have lots of tomatoes.

    Last week he still had lettuce and mesclun for sale at noon, and had lots of tomatoes.

    One of the reasons I encourage people to frequent the farmer's market is because the farmers need your business. Henry told me that he approached Whole Foods once about buying some of his stuff, and he was told that he would have to deliver it to a central warehouse in Chicago. He was hoping he could drop it off at one of the Evanston stores. Also Whole Foods wants perfect produce, and a lot of the stuff he sells would not pass muster with Whole Foods. This is the only farmer's market he goes to, although he does have a CSA at his farm.

    Most of the farmers that sell at the market do it because the chain stores do not want to do business with them. The chain stores want to buy from mega farms that can supply all of their stores with produce, instead of dealing with smaller farms. As far as peaches go too, the chain stores only want green peaches so they can keep a week. Hope this helps, Nancy
  • Post #207 - October 25th, 2019, 7:21 pm
    Post #207 - October 25th, 2019, 7:21 pm Post #207 - October 25th, 2019, 7:21 pm
    Hi- I just wanted to remind people that tomorrow is the next to last regular market. Henry picked all of his lettuce because it is supposed to get really cold there this next week, and so if you want lettuce, you better get it tomorrow. Henry is also going to have the last of his peppers and tomatoes too tomorrow. If you want tomatoes get there early. Also if you want raspberries, Koeningshofs are I am sure going to be the only people selling raspberries.

    I have not seen any spinach yet this fall. It might be because we had a warmer than usual September and the seeds would not germinate. I am sure that some of the farmer's are not going to be there next week.
  • Post #208 - October 25th, 2019, 9:33 pm
    Post #208 - October 25th, 2019, 9:33 pm Post #208 - October 25th, 2019, 9:33 pm
    Late breaking news Henry is going to bring some of his black garlic up tomorrow, but quantities are limited, and so if you want some get there early. Rain is supposed to appear later in the morning anyway.

    Has anybody bought any black garlic from the guy that is new this season, and is in the first row with the rest of the new people. I tried some back in May and it was okay. I think he sells regular garlic too, but I usually don't visit that row of sellers because it is primarily all ready prepared food. Thanks, Nancy
  • Post #209 - October 31st, 2019, 11:25 pm
    Post #209 - October 31st, 2019, 11:25 pm Post #209 - October 31st, 2019, 11:25 pm
    I just got Henry's email about what he is bringing to market this Saturday. Henry is bringing some more black garlic this week. It got down onto the high 20's last night, and it is supposed to get into the low 20's tonight on his farm, and so Henry picked all of his greens. This means that he will have few or no bunches of greens at the Thanksgiving market. Henry is running low on garlic too. This Saturday 11/2 is the last day the regular Saturday market is taking place.

    I am not sure how many farmers will be there this Saturday. It is only supposed to get up to 40, and there is a possibility of some drizzle. Koeningshof's told me they will be there this Saturday with apples, cider and raspberries. I was surprised how many raspberries they still had last Saturday when I got there at noon. They said it was not super busy there.
    Hope this helps, Nancy

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