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Park Packing - Even the Squeal [Pictures]

Park Packing - Even the Squeal [Pictures]
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  • Park Packing - Even the Squeal [Pictures]

    Post #1 - August 16th, 2010, 7:46 am
    Post #1 - August 16th, 2010, 7:46 am Post #1 - August 16th, 2010, 7:46 am
    LTH,

    Hog butcher to the world no more Park Packing remains one of the last slaughterhouses in Chicago. They graciously allowed an impromptu behind the scenes photo shoot. A separate building houses a full retail operation and, if my nose is any indication on a 95° mid-August day, Park Packing is one of the cleanest slaughterhouses in the country.

    Park Packing

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    Entire facility, including common area, is kept meat locker temperature.

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    Park Packing Retail

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    Park Packing custom cuts, grinds and will run your meat through the jaccard.

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    Every part of the pig is for sale, ofal enough to make Fergus Henderson smile.

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    Pickled pig parts anyone?

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    House made sausage as well as the bright red sausages so popular in the South.

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    Prices are, as you might expect, extremely competitive, some dry goods, fish and beef though the focus is on Mr. Piggy. As an aside, I doubt on-site slaughter accounts for all of the pork Park Packing sells as they have a wholesale operation as well as retail.

    Highly suggest a visit, if for nothing else to view a piece of Chicago's history before it disappears.

    I should note someone posted about the live pigs on site, with a picture. I searched high and low for the post but could not find. Thanks, would have given you credit if I found the post.

    Enjoy,
    Gary

    Park Packing Co
    4107 South Ashland Avenue
    Chicago, IL 60609
    773-254-0100
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #2 - August 16th, 2010, 8:18 am
    Post #2 - August 16th, 2010, 8:18 am Post #2 - August 16th, 2010, 8:18 am
    nice pics!
    First Place BBQ Sauce - 2010 NBBQA ( Natl BBQ Assoc) Awards of Excellence
  • Post #3 - August 16th, 2010, 8:21 am
    Post #3 - August 16th, 2010, 8:21 am Post #3 - August 16th, 2010, 8:21 am
    this is a great stop for your meats.
    i like shopping here alot
    & on sat. there is a taco stand right out side :mrgreen:
    philw bbq cbj for kcbs &M.I.M. carolina pit masters
  • Post #4 - August 16th, 2010, 12:43 pm
    Post #4 - August 16th, 2010, 12:43 pm Post #4 - August 16th, 2010, 12:43 pm
    I am a big fan of Park Packing, and they absolutely deserve the shout-out. During my time in Chicago, we visited them a few times every year to pick up fresh (i.e. still warm) pig brains in the morning. The guy in charge, "Tom the Slaughterhouse Guy", was incredibly generous and gave them to us for FREE - he even pulled workers off the regular butcher line to saw the pig heads in half for us and help us with the brain collection.

    It was only in my last 1.5 years that we realized they had a retail section, because we always went in through the other entrance. Nothing bad to say about their products - their ribs and pork bellies have supplied the material for quite a few of our pork parties!

    So I guess I will be a shameless shill and tell you guys to shop here and support them! :P


    Edit: "Tom the Slaughterhouse Guy" is the man in the jersey, 6th picture from the bottom :)
  • Post #5 - July 18th, 2012, 8:26 pm
    Post #5 - July 18th, 2012, 8:26 pm Post #5 - July 18th, 2012, 8:26 pm
    Anyone been here lately? They seem to have some really great weekly specials.

    These are 7/18 - 7/24:

    Image
  • Post #6 - July 19th, 2012, 2:40 am
    Post #6 - July 19th, 2012, 2:40 am Post #6 - July 19th, 2012, 2:40 am
    they have add in wed. food sec. all time .
    love going to park packing :mrgreen:
    philw bbq cbj for kcbs &M.I.M. carolina pit masters
  • Post #7 - August 11th, 2012, 8:57 pm
    Post #7 - August 11th, 2012, 8:57 pm Post #7 - August 11th, 2012, 8:57 pm
    i love park packing,went today & picked up a hog.
    and cooked for a party :mrgreen:
    had a blast& will be back for more pig
    philw bbq cbj for kcbs &M.I.M. carolina pit masters
  • Post #8 - November 8th, 2015, 10:49 am
    Post #8 - November 8th, 2015, 10:49 am Post #8 - November 8th, 2015, 10:49 am
    on another thread, mtgl wrote:I'll be smoking some tomorrow, as it will be clear and warm for November, and we have some out-of-town guests. I picked mine up today at Park Packing on 41st and Ashland--it's akin to Peoria, as you walk into a big cold room and put on disposable gloves to dump piles of meat into bags, though somehow it's a bit less nice than Peoria, which I sorta like. They had chuck and plate short ribs underneath the briskets, not at all labeled, and cheap at only 2.69 a pound. They come in large cryovac packages of about five ribs each, but if you ask, they'll cut those open and give you as much as you like.

    Hi,

    Thank you for mentioning Park Packing. A friend highlighted this post and its comparison to Peoria Packing House (PPH), especially the part about it being "less nice." Instantly a new midpoint destination was set and off to Park Packing we went.

    What an intense experience it is to visit Park Packing, which is located across the street from Swaporama. It is a smaller space than Peoria, narrow aisles with pig parts to pick over on top of the table and odd bits underneath. The beef was either crayovac or portioned, plated on a foam tray and wrapped in plastic, while PPH their beef is as open as the pig. There were two species of testicles available: pig's and bull's. Some goat parts were found underneath the table, too: legs, heads and some meat chunks.

    At PPH the butchers and buzz saws are behind a barrier. At Park's it was up close and personal, you could ask the butcher a question while he cuts away.

    I heard pig snouts were 29 cents a pound, but apparently all the pig snout devotees snapped them up before I got there. If I wanted some, I had to return after the weekend. I use them mostly for making treats for my nine dog nephews. Pig ears were a lofty $3.49, which was no surprise though I miss the days I bought them for 59 cents a pound.

    It was nearly body to body in there and two lengthy checkout lines. There was a lady frying Polish sausage samples, who said the lines moved swiftly.

    I am coming back, though I hope to go on a weekday with less people hopefully. There is so much there to soak in and learn.

    I had left my Mom in the car. When I got back, she told of all the huge meat portions walking past her. Just sitting in the car she was highly entertained.

    Thank you for highlighting this store, it is certainly my kind of place.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #9 - January 29th, 2016, 1:11 pm
    Post #9 - January 29th, 2016, 1:11 pm Post #9 - January 29th, 2016, 1:11 pm
    Whatever your heart desires can be found at Park Packing, including pizzle, balls and bung.

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    Watching an older gentleman don gloves and help himself to an unusually large amount of cow cecum, it was hard to keep from asking, Just what do you plan to do with all that bung?

    Park Packing Meat Market
    4107 S Ashland Av
    Chicago
    773-843-2200
    http://www.parkpacking.com/

    Park Packing also runs Kiki D's, a taqueria next to the packing house. It's a pretty basic setup—just order whatever looks good at the counter, get your own drinks and salsa, grab a table and eat.

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    That's half a pound of carnitas ($5.95/pound) and a taco de labio ($1.75; it's not everyday you find a taco with lips). A dozen tortillas brings the bill to around 6 bucks. Decent food and a terrific value.

    Kiki D's
    4117 S Ashland Av
    Chicago
    773-254-3526
    http://www.parkpacking.com/restaurant
  • Post #10 - January 29th, 2016, 2:06 pm
    Post #10 - January 29th, 2016, 2:06 pm Post #10 - January 29th, 2016, 2:06 pm
    Rene G wrote:Watching an older gentleman don gloves and help himself to an unusually large amount of cow cecum, it was hard to keep from asking, Just what do you plan to do with all that bung?

    So what was his response?
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #11 - January 29th, 2016, 2:15 pm
    Post #11 - January 29th, 2016, 2:15 pm Post #11 - January 29th, 2016, 2:15 pm
    boudreaulicious wrote:
    Rene G wrote:Watching an older gentleman don gloves and help himself to an unusually large amount of cow cecum, it was hard to keep from asking, Just what do you plan to do with all that bung?

    So what was his response?

    It was hard to keep from asking, but I did manage to restrain myself. I can only assume he was making sausage. The bung or cecum is a pouch at the beginning of the large intestine that's sometimes used as a casing for large-diameter sausages.
  • Post #12 - January 29th, 2016, 4:15 pm
    Post #12 - January 29th, 2016, 4:15 pm Post #12 - January 29th, 2016, 4:15 pm
    Rene G wrote:
    boudreaulicious wrote:
    Rene G wrote:Watching an older gentleman don gloves and help himself to an unusually large amount of cow cecum, it was hard to keep from asking, Just what do you plan to do with all that bung?

    So what was his response?

    It was hard to keep from asking, but I did manage to restrain myself. I can only assume he was making sausage. The bung or cecum is a pouch at the beginning of the large intestine that's sometimes used as a casing for large-diameter sausages.


    Darn! Just seeing how you would pose such a question would be entertaining, let alone the answer :)
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #13 - January 29th, 2016, 4:46 pm
    Post #13 - January 29th, 2016, 4:46 pm Post #13 - January 29th, 2016, 4:46 pm
    HI,

    You forgot to suggest people keep track of their sale items. Last week, they had made-on-the premises loose breakfast sausage for 39 cents a pound. Highway robbery was ground pork for 59 cents!

    Could not resist the siren call of baby pig for 99 cents a pound. Dreaming of a 10-12 pound suckling pig, I learned their definition of baby is 40-50 pounds. A real deal if I was about to dig a small pit to roast.

    They can arrange a small pig of a net weight 12-20 pounds for the relatively lofty price of $2.99 per pound.

    Just before the holidays, they had pig snout for 59 cents a pound.

    I have not been to Peoria Packing House in a while, but I have been here at least once a month for a while.

    Interesting place to visit and if you are lucky, you get to see someone delighted to buy lots of bung.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #14 - June 17th, 2020, 12:53 pm
    Post #14 - June 17th, 2020, 12:53 pm Post #14 - June 17th, 2020, 12:53 pm
    In another thread, Rene G wrote:It's on the South Side, ruling it out for many, but Park Packing currently has pork butt for $0.99/pound and spare ribs for $1.49/pound. Both are fresh, never frozen, slaughtered on site. They also have pork snouts (previously frozen) on sale for $0.19/pound, an unbeatable deal. Maybe it's time for a batch of barbecued snoots?

    If anyone is still looking for pork butts, they're down to $0.79/pound at Park Packing. Spare ribs are still $1.49/pound and ground pork is $0.69/pound. All fresh, never frozen. The super-cheap snoots and jerk sausage are history, though fresh Mississippi sausage can be had for $0.79/pound. No meat shortage at Park.

    Park Packing
    4107 S Ashland Av
    Chicago
    773-843-2200
    http://www.parkpacking.com/specials
  • Post #15 - June 22nd, 2020, 10:54 am
    Post #15 - June 22nd, 2020, 10:54 am Post #15 - June 22nd, 2020, 10:54 am
    Some scenes from Park Packing on Saturday, June 20...

    There was a line of about 20 people at 3pm, an hour before closing, but it moved quickly.

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    Masks are required and everyone must wash their hands and don gloves before entering. Gloves were always standard at Park, as you handle and bag your own meat.

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    The number of shoppers is limited to a reasonable number. The main aisle was somewhat crowded at first, but one could simply walk around to the other side of the pork table.

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    Butt was $0.79/pound, spares were $1.49/pound, and almost everything was in good supply. No Mississippi sausage unfortunately.

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    Meaty neck bones were a steal at $0.19/pound and feet were $0.59/pound. How about some nice pozole on the cheap?

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    Small intestines were cleaned out, but there were pizzles aplenty.

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    Park Packing
    4107 S Ashland Av
    Chicago
    773-843-2200
    Mon-Fri 6-6; Sat 6-4; Sun 6-2
    http://www.parkpacking.com/
  • Post #16 - June 26th, 2020, 7:57 am
    Post #16 - June 26th, 2020, 7:57 am Post #16 - June 26th, 2020, 7:57 am
    Hi,

    I like my meat cheap and fresh. I bought 10 pounds of pork shoulder last weekend at 79 cents per pound. I cooked everything at once at an oven setting of 225 degrees, though it was three different preparations.

    Two pounds of pork shoulder were devoted to sundevilpeg's char siu. A post which long ago sent a number of people on their own paths to homemade char siu. This time I froze almost all of it for use in future meals: fried rice, char siu over rice and goodness knows whatever else.

    Two pounds were made into carnitas with a two step process: cubed then cooked in a slurry of spices, orange and lime juice until tender. Remove the tender cubes, tear into shreds and lay on a small baking pan. Now it was suggested to flip on the broiler to crisp and char the carnitas. I returned it to the 225 degrees over to dry out and crisp. This was dinner served with fresh salsa, sour cream and Doritos. I was going to buy tortillas, but Doritos are far better liked.

    Six pounds of pork shoulder were rubbed with a half-cup each of sugar and salt, then sat in the refrigerator overnight. This was cooked until tender over eight hours. Once removed from the oven, the bone was pulled and the pork roughly pulled apart. It was packed into three 17-ounce bags for future meals.

    At least one meal, I will defrost, heat in the microwave, coat the top with brown sugar to broil. It will be weeknight Bo Ssam, which is how this meat was prepared.

    ***

    On the same trip, I bought 6.28 pork spares ribs for $1.49 per pound. I trimmed both racks to St. Louis style ribs. Two racks weighing 3.5 pound now in the freezer for a day when BBQ is just what we want for dinner.

    The cuttings (also known as rib tips) were cut into one-inch piece sections, then steamed with black bean sauce. Instead of a dim sum portion of steamed pork ribs, I had a dinner sized portion to cook at 2.5 pounds. I had leftover black bean sauce, which I used later to season some sauteed zucchini.

    ***

    I also bought 1.98 pounds of pork taco meat at 69 cents per pound, which effectively were odd sized trimmings from cutting down pork. These were packed in three 11-ounce portions to go into various Chinese dishes over time. I expect I may want to cut the meat into more uniform pieces, but I will wait until I get around to cooking it.

    Park Packing is where you get change back for your $20.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    Park Packing
    4107 S. Ashland Ave
    Chicago, IL
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #17 - June 26th, 2020, 8:37 am
    Post #17 - June 26th, 2020, 8:37 am Post #17 - June 26th, 2020, 8:37 am
    I bought a rack of spares from Park yesterday morning and cooked them up on the smoker. Turned out great! It was a pretty meaty slab, so one spare rib was actually enough for dinner for me when combined with some coleslaw, potato salad, and grilled calabacita. (Cue the "one rib" scene from "I'm Gonna Git You Sucka.")

    I was so happy when my four-year-old daughter came around and asked what we were eating. I told her "ribs, honey." "Can I have some?" "Of course." Normally, she's somewhat picky, though not as picky as her 6-year-old sister, so I typically will do a separate dinner for both of them. I cut some off the bone from her, she finishes her plate, and says "can I have some more?" Ah, she's definitely my daughter!
  • Post #18 - June 26th, 2020, 10:47 am
    Post #18 - June 26th, 2020, 10:47 am Post #18 - June 26th, 2020, 10:47 am
    Am I the only one who had to Google "pizzle" because of this thread?
  • Post #19 - June 26th, 2020, 11:38 am
    Post #19 - June 26th, 2020, 11:38 am Post #19 - June 26th, 2020, 11:38 am
    Jonah wrote:Am I the only one who had to Google "pizzle" because of this thread?

    Nope
  • Post #20 - June 26th, 2020, 5:55 pm
    Post #20 - June 26th, 2020, 5:55 pm Post #20 - June 26th, 2020, 5:55 pm
    Jonah wrote:Am I the only one who had to Google "pizzle" because of this thread?
    Well, I don't know what it is, but decided to stay ignorant on it.
    The thing about quotes on the internet is you can not confirm their validity. -- Abraham Lincoln
  • Post #21 - June 27th, 2020, 6:00 am
    Post #21 - June 27th, 2020, 6:00 am Post #21 - June 27th, 2020, 6:00 am
    zoid wrote:
    Jonah wrote:Am I the only one who had to Google "pizzle" because of this thread?

    Nope

    I regret that I did.
  • Post #22 - June 27th, 2020, 6:57 am
    Post #22 - June 27th, 2020, 6:57 am Post #22 - June 27th, 2020, 6:57 am
    Jonah wrote:Am I the only one who had to Google "pizzle" because of this thread?


    We learned it in high school from Shakespeare:

    "Away, you starvelling, you elf-skin, you dried neat’s-tongue, bull’s-pizzle, you stock-fish!" - Henry IV Part I.

    Also, if you have a dog, you may have seen "bully sticks." Those are made from beef pizzle. Some brands market them straightforwardly as "pizzle sticks" or "pizzle chews."

    Also, if you see "fries" as in "pork fries" (which they also have at Park Packing), that's testicles.
  • Post #23 - June 27th, 2020, 9:38 am
    Post #23 - June 27th, 2020, 9:38 am Post #23 - June 27th, 2020, 9:38 am
    A famous Chowhound post before there was ever an LTHforum:

    coolerbythelake's great post TBS African Lunch Truck Sighting
    "I give you a little penis for free."
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #24 - June 27th, 2020, 3:18 pm
    Post #24 - June 27th, 2020, 3:18 pm Post #24 - June 27th, 2020, 3:18 pm
    Also the name of one of the greatest food blogs of all time.

    The Pizzle
    Ronnie said I should probably tell you guys about my website so

    Hey I have a website.
    http://www.sandwichtribunal.com
  • Post #25 - June 27th, 2020, 8:54 pm
    Post #25 - June 27th, 2020, 8:54 pm Post #25 - June 27th, 2020, 8:54 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:Six pounds of pork shoulder were rubbed with a half-cup each of sugar and salt, then sat in the refrigerator overnight. This was cooked until tender over eight hours. Once removed from the oven, the bone was pulled and the pork roughly pulled apart. It was packed into three 17-ounce bags for future meals.

    At least one meal, I will defrost, heat in the microwave, coat the top with brown sugar to broil. It will be weeknight Bo Ssam, which is how this meat was prepared.

    Hi,

    I decided to give my weeknight bo ssam a try this evening: I heated the meat in the microwave, then spread the meat on my 12-inch pizza pan. I patted the surface with brown sugar and place it under the broiler until the brown sugar melted.

    I did not preheat the broiler. I turned it on after the meat was placed underneath. I did this to minimize the amount of heat thrown into the kitchen.

    I served this with ginger green scallion sauce, leftover zucchini in black bean sauce and Yugoslav cabbage salad. I would have included some leftover rice, but I did not find the container until after dinner.

    The next time I do this, I will pack in one or two bulbs of garlic cooked in the pork fat along with the pork for a future meal.

    From start to finish, dinner was on the table in less than 15 minutes. My kind of fast food!

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #26 - June 28th, 2020, 7:10 am
    Post #26 - June 28th, 2020, 7:10 am Post #26 - June 28th, 2020, 7:10 am
    What a great idea. I'm going to try it. I love bo ssam, but rarely make it.

    As far as heat in the kitchen, I assume you keep your stove top fan on when using the oven in summer. I have a very powerful fan and it keeps the kitchen cool when using the oven.
  • Post #27 - June 28th, 2020, 7:35 am
    Post #27 - June 28th, 2020, 7:35 am Post #27 - June 28th, 2020, 7:35 am
    Hi,

    The fan makes a loop returning to the kitchen.

    I try to minimize the heat, because if the fan did go outside, then so does my cool air, too.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #28 - July 23rd, 2020, 5:37 pm
    Post #28 - July 23rd, 2020, 5:37 pm Post #28 - July 23rd, 2020, 5:37 pm
    Park Packing is having their Christmas in July sale (ends July 28), with some really good prices. Pork butts are $0.59/pound, spare ribs are $0.99/pound, housemade pan sausage is $0.49/pound, and pig feet are $0.39/pound. All are fresh, never frozen; the pigs are slaughtered on site. Their hot link / Italian / Polish / bratwurst / jerk sausages are $1.99 for a 5 pound box. Also smoked ham hocks are $0.49/pound.

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