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  • Post #31 - January 19th, 2011, 6:50 pm
    Post #31 - January 19th, 2011, 6:50 pm Post #31 - January 19th, 2011, 6:50 pm
    Most dishwasher brands have multiple models with differing features, so be careful when generalizing. One point that can be generalized is the higher priced models from a brand are quieter than the lower priced models.

    For example, some Bosch models have flexible flatware baskets that can be positioned in several different places including separating the two parts so you can use one, both or neither part with multiple places the baskets can be placed while others have a fixed basket in the middle front of the lower rack. The flexible flatware basket is a really good feature, particularly when combined with tines that turn down flat for maximum flexibility in loading.

    Kitchen Aid dishwashers have become quite tall. When our old one conked out in 2002, the current production would not fit in our cabinets. Measure very carefully if you are replacing an early 90s model. We had to go with a Maytag that was never really satisfactory. Our current Bosch 500 series has been much better but did require some work with my router to thin the particle board underlying the counter top. I also had to put thin plywood under the dishwasher to align the floor with the current thickness of underlayment in the kitchen. Cabinets may nominally be standard height, but installation may vary if the kitchen floor is not level. With a house built in 1915 we have different counter heights relative to the floor at opposite ends of the main counter. Unfortunately, the dishwasher cutout is near the end with the shorter height. The differences are small, certainly not visible without measuring tools, but critical.
  • Post #32 - January 19th, 2011, 7:46 pm
    Post #32 - January 19th, 2011, 7:46 pm Post #32 - January 19th, 2011, 7:46 pm
    HI,

    The current KitchenAid dishwasher's greatest problems was service when under warranty. It was few months old when I noticed the rubber gasket was loose. Normally I would have fixed it myself. I decided it was under warranty, let it be KitchenAid's problem.

    The first repair guy installed the gasket wrong. The second repair guy wasn't happy the first repair. I really don't want to go into too much detail, but the lack of continuity of servicemen became an issue. When a new one arrived with parts ordered by an earlier repair guy, he'd disagree with the solution. One service guy rocked the dishwasher so violently it cause the stainless steel tub to skew. Another serviceman identified the problem and ordered a new stainless steel tub. Unfortunately he wasn't the one to visit next and the new guy took the tub away. Finally this service guy returns with the tub and basicly disassembled the old tub and reassembled them onto the new tub. This means motors, door and anything else that hangs off the tub and frame.

    I have had very little problems since the fourteenth and final visit.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #33 - January 23rd, 2011, 2:05 pm
    Post #33 - January 23rd, 2011, 2:05 pm Post #33 - January 23rd, 2011, 2:05 pm
    We got a KA a few years ago and no problems at all.

    It was either top of the line or near the top of the line, and has sanitize and the top silverware rack. Had my heart set on a Miele with a top rack at the time, but went over to KA since it has heated dry and a food grinder. The silverware rack takes a little longer to load, but if you place like items together is fast to unload. Also I like having the adjustable shelves--adjusted to fit my tall pot and tall glasses one time so I don't fiddle with this much now.

    My model has the door that stops where you open it (you can leave it halfway open, for example), and I did see reports that whatever holds the door in place would suddenly break and the door would crash down. You can drive yourself a little crazy with issues that people post....
    "things like being careful with your coriander/ that's what makes the gravy grander" - Sondheim
  • Post #34 - January 23rd, 2011, 5:52 pm
    Post #34 - January 23rd, 2011, 5:52 pm Post #34 - January 23rd, 2011, 5:52 pm
    grits wrote:My model has the door that stops where you open it (you can leave it halfway open, for example), and I did see reports that whatever holds the door in place would suddenly break and the door would crash down. You can drive yourself a little crazy with issues that people post....

    I've had that problem. Based on my description, the guy arrived with the parts and fixed it immediately. Until he arrived, that door would opened like deadweight: really, really fast. Until you mentioned it, I had forgotten.

    I find it interesting people who buy cars with extended warranties. They get used to not paying for repairs, then act like the car is a dud once the warranty has concluded when repairs are an out of pocket expense.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #35 - January 24th, 2011, 9:32 am
    Post #35 - January 24th, 2011, 9:32 am Post #35 - January 24th, 2011, 9:32 am
    We had our kitchen renovated nearly 3 years ago and went with the higher end Kitchenaid dishwasher and refrigerator (we did splurge on the Wolf gas range/stove/hood combo so we budgeted down a bit for the remaining appliances.) So far, we've been really happy with both and would definitely buy them again. Our last dishwasher (a GE profile model) was ridiculously loud, so loud it used to keep the twins awake if we tried to run it after bedtime, so the noise factor was probably my biggest concern when purchasing a new one. The Kitchenaid is really quiet and efficient, and the only time we've had any problems with it turned out to be unrelated to the dishwasher itself (our contractor installed the plumbing wrong, and the repair guy from Kitchenaid very diplomatically showed me how it was improperly done so that I could make the contractor redo it.)

    We went with the refrigerator model that has the lower drawer for the freezer and the two swinging doors for the upper fridge. We haven't had any performance related problems at all, and we love the design of it that puts the ice make in the door instead of taking up valuable shelf space inside the refrigerator compartment. The drawers are all still in sound working order, and are holding up well to the abuse of our now 5 year old twins constantly prying them open to see what is inside.

    Seebee, it sounds to me like you probably got a defective model for your fridge. I would personally still recommend my Kitchenaid appliances to anyone and would happily buy them again.
  • Post #36 - January 24th, 2011, 11:47 am
    Post #36 - January 24th, 2011, 11:47 am Post #36 - January 24th, 2011, 11:47 am
    Cathy2 wrote:
    grits wrote:My model has the door that stops where you open it (you can leave it halfway open, for example), and I did see reports that whatever holds the door in place would suddenly break and the door would crash down. You can drive yourself a little crazy with issues that people post....

    I've had that problem. Based on my description, the guy arrived with the parts and fixed it immediately. Until he arrived, that door would opened like deadweight: really, really fast.
    That's scary. This was an issue that did concern me since there is a possibility of injury if whatever holds the door in place breaks. Glad no-one got hurt in your house, and I hope my beloved KA continues with no issues.
    "things like being careful with your coriander/ that's what makes the gravy grander" - Sondheim
  • Post #37 - January 24th, 2011, 8:50 pm
    Post #37 - January 24th, 2011, 8:50 pm Post #37 - January 24th, 2011, 8:50 pm
    So, after opening this thread last week and reading a few posts, I decided that I didn't need to read anymore because I wouldn't have to deal with it for some time. 2 days later, the Frigidaire dishwasher that came with the condo I purchased last year (built in 2003) died. I called the number in the manual and it said that there was only one service center in the area, located in Arlington Heights. Does anyone have a handyman that specializes in dishwashers in the city (Ukie Village) that they have used ?
    Last edited by ziggy on January 24th, 2011, 11:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
  • Post #38 - January 24th, 2011, 10:52 pm
    Post #38 - January 24th, 2011, 10:52 pm Post #38 - January 24th, 2011, 10:52 pm
    This has been a great and much appreciated thread that I hope continues; we went with a mid-tier Bosch, and I'll post in a few months on how the inaugural period has been for it.
  • Post #39 - January 27th, 2011, 11:05 am
    Post #39 - January 27th, 2011, 11:05 am Post #39 - January 27th, 2011, 11:05 am
    I had to come back to this thread because I am waiting for my plumber to take a look at my Bosch that I claimed love for up thread. I was doing a load yesterday and after a few minutes I could hear an odd noise from another room..... there was water all over the floor in front of the Bosch! I must recommend those microfiber towels because 4 of them easily soaked up a lot of water very quickly. I am hoping the drain is plugged but he already told me it's probably the pump. If that's the case I am just going to buy a new dishwasher but now I'm leaning towards a Kitchenaid based on discussion here.
  • Post #40 - July 3rd, 2014, 9:11 am
    Post #40 - July 3rd, 2014, 9:11 am Post #40 - July 3rd, 2014, 9:11 am
    Any updates on dishwasher loves/hates? We have been babying along our 8-yr. old Kenmore Ultrawash, and now the control panel has failed. We'd rather get a new one than spend more money on this one. I would appreciate your thoughts and experiences before we head out shopping.
  • Post #41 - July 3rd, 2014, 11:28 am
    Post #41 - July 3rd, 2014, 11:28 am Post #41 - July 3rd, 2014, 11:28 am
    If quietness is a consideration...We bought our Bosch a few years ago largely on the strength of its reputed quietness, and we have not been disappointed. It is amazingly quiet. Essentially inaudible from a few yards away, and even when we're closer it's sometimes hard to tell if we're hearing the dishwasher or the quiet hum of the refrigerator.
    Pithy quote here.
  • Post #42 - November 28th, 2017, 12:31 pm
    Post #42 - November 28th, 2017, 12:31 pm Post #42 - November 28th, 2017, 12:31 pm
    Hi,

    I now use a KitchenAid two-drawer dishwasher. The rack configuration and capacity are exactly the same. One seems to wash just a little better than the other. I deliberately do not favor either drawer, I use them alternately. It is a very quiet machine with just an occasional whirring noise. There are cute little tunes when you open a drawer or when it finishes.

    I wasn't sure I was going to like this dishwasher set up, but now I think I like it better than a one-tub dishwasher.

    Unless I am doing some heavy prep, running two drawers a day seems to be our average. As dinner is being prepared, soiled dishes go into the dishwasher with lunch dishes already sitting in wait. When the meal is over, I finish filling and commence washing. If there are any leftover dishes to be washed, they go into the other drawer. They will be washed with the breakfast dishes or until it fills to capacity.

    I typically hand wash the wooden stirrers and cutting board. These are placed temporarily in an empty or partially empty dishwasher drawer to dry. There is no need for a drying rack to clutter up the counter. There is also very little reason for dishes to stack in the sink, because usually one drawer is waiting to be filled.

    Thanksgiving eve, both dishwashers were running when I went to bed. I believe on Thanksgiving, they ran five times.

    The real test may come over Christmas, when the household more than doubles with guests. I expect at least one drawer to run per meal.

    I will certainly work with whatever dishwasher is available. I find a double-drawer dishwasher works well with my work flow practices.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #43 - November 29th, 2017, 8:59 am
    Post #43 - November 29th, 2017, 8:59 am Post #43 - November 29th, 2017, 8:59 am
    FWIW after our Kitchenaid died a few years ago, I did a survey of the industry, brands and features.
    Since we process our own water, low water usage was a must, followed by quiet and of course, the thing had to get the dishes washed!
    A Bosch SuperSilence 39 Dba was ordered and installed.
    Expensive, over $2000.
    But the Europeans have different water usage standards and the machine also treats it’s own water with a receptacle in the bottom for softener. since we only treat our drinking water, it seemed like a good feature.
    https://blog.yaleappliance.com/american ... ishwashers
    It’s so quiet that I opened the door a couple of times to get something and found the washer running!
    Superb cleaning! Best I have ever had or seen.
    Made in Germany.-Richard
    BTW as to Kitchenaid, much of it’s product line is made offshore and Kitchenaid is now longer the brand I knew.
    As the Kitchenaid appliances die, I am looking elsewhere.
  • Post #44 - November 30th, 2017, 10:08 am
    Post #44 - November 30th, 2017, 10:08 am Post #44 - November 30th, 2017, 10:08 am
    When we renovated our kitchen two years ago, we put in a dishwasher. There was never the slightest doubt what we would do. Even though I'd lived a happy decade with a Hobart, it was noisy, and a profligate water-user. I'd lived in Germany, so I knew Bosch rather well. And then a very very careful engineer pal put a Bosch in his new kitchen and I had the opportunity to observe its performance over several years.

    There simply wasn't any question: we were going to go with Bosch. Two years later we remain enormously pleased with our decision.

    It's quiet beyond belief. What a relief *that* is. Now there are some things you have to get used to: it's slow, a cycle takes a looonnng time. And there is no drying element, dishes dry from the residual heat from the hot water. So your water has to be HOT! And it takes some time for the dishes to dry, so the machine has to be left closed for some time after the cycle.

    And the machine IS Deutsch, after all: when the cycle is complete, it dings a bell. And dings. And dings. It's really quite insistant (at least, unlike my Korean appliances, the bell is not off-key). So I open the door and as quickly as possible turn the machine off.

    But I'm as satisfied with this appliance as one can be satisfied with any machine.

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #45 - November 30th, 2017, 10:43 am
    Post #45 - November 30th, 2017, 10:43 am Post #45 - November 30th, 2017, 10:43 am
    When we did our kitchen remodel, we had picked out a nice Kitchenaid/Hobart dishwasher. Due to some poor measurments by our contractor, the Kitchenaid was slightly too deep to fit flush under our countertops, so we ended up with a Bosch instead. That was the happiest mistake our contractor ever made. Ive been more than pleased with the Bosch, and happy with the way things turned out.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #46 - November 30th, 2017, 10:54 am
    Post #46 - November 30th, 2017, 10:54 am Post #46 - November 30th, 2017, 10:54 am
    We have a Bosch also, and are very happy with it. We have a mid price model....there are lots of little variations as far as noise level and bells and whistles. Ours does not make any sound when finished, rather the red light that shines on the floor goes off. A friend has the next model up which projects the remaining cycle time on the floor instead of just a red light. My only complaint is that there is currently a recall for a bunch of the models manufactured a few years ago for a faulty electrical cord. The instructions say to stop using it until it can be fixed though it sounds like there have only been a handful of issues from among millions of units so I am still using it. I registered right away and called the designated repair company and was told it would take a couple of weeks for the part to come in but they would let me know. That was a month ago. Hopefully this will be quicker than the part for my food processor.

    -Will
  • Post #47 - December 1st, 2017, 1:02 am
    Post #47 - December 1st, 2017, 1:02 am Post #47 - December 1st, 2017, 1:02 am
    One of my sisters had a Bosch, and she got a lemon. She only had it for two years when it died on her. I am sure that the most she paid for it was $500. She got it because a friend of hers raved about her dishwasher. My Sister did not get another Bosch. It died on her right before Christmas, and so we were doing lots of dishes by hand that week.
  • Post #48 - December 1st, 2017, 6:55 am
    Post #48 - December 1st, 2017, 6:55 am Post #48 - December 1st, 2017, 6:55 am
    I had to get a new dishwasher a couple of months ago and I debated the Bosch, but ultimately couldn't get past the lack of a drying element. I settled on a KitchenAid based upon Consumer Reports ratings and so far I'm very happy. Granted, I had a 15-year old GE Profile dishwasher but the KitchenAid is very quiet and cleans and drys very well.
  • Post #49 - December 1st, 2017, 8:15 am
    Post #49 - December 1st, 2017, 8:15 am Post #49 - December 1st, 2017, 8:15 am
    My Bosch has a sanitize cycle which I think heats the last rinse water up to 155. I use this and there is no need for a drying element. When the cycle is done everything is dry, other than occasional pooling on some cups, etc.

    -Will
  • Post #50 - December 1st, 2017, 9:00 am
    Post #50 - December 1st, 2017, 9:00 am Post #50 - December 1st, 2017, 9:00 am
    My brother bought a Bosch and had it taken out in <1 week
    could not get past having to "line up" the silverware in "special" drawer
    "If you reject the food, ignore the customs, fear the religion and avoid the people, you might better stay home."
    ~James Michener
  • Post #51 - December 1st, 2017, 9:35 am
    Post #51 - December 1st, 2017, 9:35 am Post #51 - December 1st, 2017, 9:35 am
    We love our Bosch. It's mid-to-low end of the line without any special tones. It cleans fabulously and is remarkably quiet. Yes, it's a long cycle, and, yes, there is some water pooling in concave surfaces after the dry cycle, but the advantages far outweigh the few and minor disadvantages.
  • Post #52 - December 1st, 2017, 9:36 am
    Post #52 - December 1st, 2017, 9:36 am Post #52 - December 1st, 2017, 9:36 am
    We looked at Bosch after our 3 1/2 year old Maytag died, but the lack of a drying element led us to a decision between a KitchenAid and a Whirlpool. We went with the Whirlpool, because the silverware rack is in the door, freeing up more space in the shelves. Also, raising and lowering the top shelf was a little easier than with the KitchenAid. (Whirlpool and KitchenAid are from the same company.) Only downside is it's tough to know if it's running or not, unless you notice the tiny light on the front. It's that quiet.
  • Post #53 - December 1st, 2017, 9:58 am
    Post #53 - December 1st, 2017, 9:58 am Post #53 - December 1st, 2017, 9:58 am
    nr706 wrote:We looked at Bosch after our 3 1/2 year old Maytag died, but the lack of a drying element led us to a decision between a KitchenAid and a Whirlpool. We went with the Whirlpool, because the silverware rack is in the door, freeing up more space in the shelves. Also, raising and lowering the top shelf was a little easier than with the KitchenAid. (Whirlpool and KitchenAid are from the same company.) Only downside is it's tough to know if it's running or not, unless you notice the tiny light on the front. It's that quiet.


    Ditto all of this—and very reasonably priced. only downside, and I’m sure it’s something that can be fixed, there’s a lot of gunk collecting in the bottom that I can’t figure out how to remove. Any suggestions?
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #54 - December 1st, 2017, 10:17 am
    Post #54 - December 1st, 2017, 10:17 am Post #54 - December 1st, 2017, 10:17 am
    nr706 wrote:We looked at Bosch after our 3 1/2 year old Maytag died, but the lack of a drying element led us to a decision between a KitchenAid and a Whirlpool. We went with the Whirlpool...Only downside is it's tough to know if it's running or not, unless you notice the tiny light on the front. It's that quiet.

    Good to know Bosch isn't the only quiet dishwasher. As a data point on the quietude front, we've had our Bosch for many years now--we selected it because at the time, Consumer Reports said it was the quietest, and that was a primary consideration for us--and if you are more than 3 feet away from it, it's dead silent. Closer than 3 feet, and you can just barely make it out.
    Pithy quote here.
  • Post #55 - December 1st, 2017, 12:32 pm
    Post #55 - December 1st, 2017, 12:32 pm Post #55 - December 1st, 2017, 12:32 pm
    The best dishwasher we ever owned was in our last house, top of the line Miele purchased in 2011. Had the water softener and Riedel crystal approved.

    In our new house we have what I think is a one from the top Bosch, with the water softener, top flatware drawer, and OK for crystal. We are very happy with it. I feel the salt is needed to keep your glasses clear.

    Just remember, European dishwashers do not have a disposal/grinder or a water heater (you must make sure your tap water is already hot).
  • Post #56 - December 1st, 2017, 2:28 pm
    Post #56 - December 1st, 2017, 2:28 pm Post #56 - December 1st, 2017, 2:28 pm
    Everyone keeps saying that there is no heating element, and while I cant see one, there has to be one for the sanitize cycle to work. No way it is getting that hot from the water from my tap. Unless there is a non european version of Bosche, or it is a recent change.

    -Will
  • Post #57 - December 1st, 2017, 2:38 pm
    Post #57 - December 1st, 2017, 2:38 pm Post #57 - December 1st, 2017, 2:38 pm
    Bosch has a *water* heating element IIRC, but no *air* heating element. Almost nobody does anymore. Here's an interesting article describing the current state of play:

    http://dishwashers.reviewed.com/features/why-doesnt-my-dishwasher-dry-dishes

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #58 - December 1st, 2017, 3:27 pm
    Post #58 - December 1st, 2017, 3:27 pm Post #58 - December 1st, 2017, 3:27 pm
    boudreaulicious wrote:there’s a lot of gunk collecting in the bottom that I can’t figure out how to remove. Any suggestions?

    Hi,

    I had this problem with my last KitchenAid dishwasher.

    When I bought it, I was told I didn't need to thoroughly scrap off the dishes. There was a built-in disposal to take care of any food scraps. Ok, so I didn't make too much effort to remove the food.

    Flash forward to a repair call, when they inquired if I scraped my dishes. I told them what the salesman said, which the repair person said was an overstatement. He then pointed to the accumulating gunk at the bottom of the dishwasher. This gunk was made of grease and food bits that had nowhere to go.

    I used a combination of elbow grease, a lot of paper towels and vinegar to deal with this mess. I saw a discussion on this issue here.

    If you neglect it, then you may have a dishwasher requiring a service call.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #59 - December 1st, 2017, 4:12 pm
    Post #59 - December 1st, 2017, 4:12 pm Post #59 - December 1st, 2017, 4:12 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:
    boudreaulicious wrote:there’s a lot of gunk collecting in the bottom that I can’t figure out how to remove. Any suggestions?

    Hi,

    I had this problem with my last KitchenAid dishwasher.

    When I bought it, I was told I didn't need to thoroughly scrap off the dishes. There was a built-in disposal to take care of any food scraps. Ok, so I didn't make too much effort to remove the food.

    Flash forward to a repair call, when they inquired if I scraped my dishes. I told them what the salesman said, which the repair person said was an overstatement. He then pointed to the accumulating gunk at the bottom of the dishwasher. This gunk was made of grease and food bits that had nowhere to go.

    I used a combination of elbow grease, a lot of paper towels and vinegar to deal with this mess. I saw a discussion on this issue here.

    If you neglect it, then you may have a dishwasher requiring a service call.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    This is why we went with a Bosch, which we really like. There's an easily-removable filter in the unit. Once a month, we take it out, knock its contents into the garbage and get on with our lives. I thought it would be a sacrifice not having a dedicated drying element but since running the dishwasher is usually the last thing we do before we head to bed for the evening, it hasn't been an issue. In the morning, everything's completely dry.

    =R=
    There are many things that are legal that are not a great idea --Nick Shabazz

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #60 - December 1st, 2017, 5:47 pm
    Post #60 - December 1st, 2017, 5:47 pm Post #60 - December 1st, 2017, 5:47 pm
    Geo wrote:When we renovated our kitchen two years ago, we put in a dishwasher. There was never the slightest doubt what we would do. Even though I'd lived a happy decade with a Hobart, it was noisy, and a profligate water-user. I'd lived in Germany, so I knew Bosch rather well. And then a very very careful engineer pal put a Bosch in his new kitchen and I had the opportunity to observe its performance over several years.

    There simply wasn't any question: we were going to go with Bosch. Two years later we remain enormously pleased with our decision.

    It's quiet beyond belief. What a relief *that* is. Now there are some things you have to get used to: it's slow, a cycle takes a looonnng time. And there is no drying element, dishes dry from the residual heat from the hot water. So your water has to be HOT! And it takes some time for the dishes to dry, so the machine has to be left closed for some time after the cycle.

    And the machine IS Deutsch, after all: when the cycle is complete, it dings a bell. And dings. And dings. It's really quite insistant (at least, unlike my Korean appliances, the bell is not off-key). So I open the door and as quickly as possible turn the machine off.

    But I'm as satisfied with this appliance as one can be satisfied with any machine.

    Geo

    In the instruction manual, it tells how to turn the constant ring OFF, actually it limits the ring to five times.-Richard

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