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How to make Fried Rice like a Chinese Restaurant

How to make Fried Rice like a Chinese Restaurant
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  • Post #31 - October 20th, 2011, 9:55 am
    Post #31 - October 20th, 2011, 9:55 am Post #31 - October 20th, 2011, 9:55 am
    Thanks. I looked it up on Wheaton's on line site and my library has it so I'll get it next time I go there.
    Toria

    "I like this place and willingly could waste my time in it" - As You Like It,
    W. Shakespeare
  • Post #32 - October 20th, 2011, 10:48 am
    Post #32 - October 20th, 2011, 10:48 am Post #32 - October 20th, 2011, 10:48 am
    Thanks. That sounds good.
    Toria

    "I like this place and willingly could waste my time in it" - As You Like It,
    W. Shakespeare
  • Post #33 - October 20th, 2011, 11:29 am
    Post #33 - October 20th, 2011, 11:29 am Post #33 - October 20th, 2011, 11:29 am
    sebee, that's pretty much my method as well. The only difference for me is that I generally add the green onions right at the end. Works every time.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #34 - October 20th, 2011, 12:00 pm
    Post #34 - October 20th, 2011, 12:00 pm Post #34 - October 20th, 2011, 12:00 pm
    toria wrote:The problem with carrots is if raw they would take too much time to get done.

    A tip for raw carrots that applies in almost every similar situation: I use a vegetable peeler and make thin ribbons that cook quickly.
  • Post #35 - October 20th, 2011, 12:52 pm
    Post #35 - October 20th, 2011, 12:52 pm Post #35 - October 20th, 2011, 12:52 pm
    Hi,

    I've been testing recipes recently for a Japanese cookbook. They had a technique for dealing with carrots that offers a different look and quick cooking:

    Slice the carrots with a pairing knife as if you were whittling a stick. They come out thin and oblong.

    I'll advise more on this cookbook once it is released sometime from now.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
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  • Post #36 - October 20th, 2011, 1:24 pm
    Post #36 - October 20th, 2011, 1:24 pm Post #36 - October 20th, 2011, 1:24 pm
    Mhays wrote:
    toria wrote:The problem with carrots is if raw they would take too much time to get done.

    A tip for raw carrots that applies in almost every similar situation: I use a vegetable peeler and make thin ribbons that cook quickly.


    Cut them in small cubes and add them to the wok first so they have a longer time to cook. I often use yellow onions and generally let them and the carrots have a little extra wok time together before adding any other veg. This has the added benefit of carmalizing the edges of the onions a bit before the wok cools down.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #37 - October 20th, 2011, 3:40 pm
    Post #37 - October 20th, 2011, 3:40 pm Post #37 - October 20th, 2011, 3:40 pm
    toria wrote:The problem with carrots is if raw they would take too much time to get done. The fried rice I recall did not have carrots, although in this day and age they are found in a lot of chinese dishes, including fried rice. Years ago you could get chinese food with real chinese vegetables, bok choy, bamboo shoots, bean sprouts, black mushrooms, tree ear, lily buds. Now they chop up some green pepper, onions, and carrots drench it in a sweetish soy sauce and that's chinese food. Maybe I'm a victim of "suburban chinese food syndrome" and I need to go to China town.


    The real problem with carrots is that they simply do not belong in the fried rice of my world.

    If I see fried rice with that light tan colored fluffy rice dotted with the contents of a frozen bag of discount peas and carrots, I know I'm pretty much in for "glop" instead of Chinese food. I'm not sure when this started but I first noticed it in the southwest many, many moons ago. I laughed my butt off when my order of vegetable fried rice came as that stuff, and it went into my mental notes as a reason that the Southwest would never be for me. I thought I'd never see that in the Chicagoland area, but, apparently, here we are. When I'm wanting fried rice from a new place, and "vegetable fried rice is on the menu," I ask what vegetables are in it. Once you say, hold the frozen peas and carrots, and then list off actual vegetables that would belong in a vegetarian meal that the place should be actually proud to serve to someone, I usually get e decent concoction. I usually offer them the note that I would be happy if they would care to throw in any fresh peppers, or some chili garlic sauce, or other interesting bits they might have to the mix. Frozen peas and carrots tho - that's their way of saying "They will just eat whatever we slop out to them."
    We cannot be friends if you do not know the difference between Mayo and Miracle Whip.
  • Post #38 - October 20th, 2011, 3:42 pm
    Post #38 - October 20th, 2011, 3:42 pm Post #38 - October 20th, 2011, 3:42 pm
    If you wanna get your wok screaming hot, I'd recommend a turkey fryer. I use my turkery fryer for everything but frying stuff. I put my cast iron on the burner to get it screaming hot for restaurant style steaks (sear on each side, finish in the oven or with indirect heat on a grill), for brewing beer outdoors, and best of all, for creating a wok that gets hotter than most indoor stoves will. I just prep everything and have the bowls lined up and ready to go. You can make fried rice in a couple of minutes, same with most Chinese dishes.

    The bonus is your house doesn't reek like a chinese restaurant after you are done, since you did all the cooking outdoors.
    Visit my new website at http://www.splatteredpages.com or my old one at www.eatwisconsin.com
  • Post #39 - October 20th, 2011, 3:45 pm
    Post #39 - October 20th, 2011, 3:45 pm Post #39 - October 20th, 2011, 3:45 pm
    seebee wrote:
    toria wrote:The problem with carrots is if raw they would take too much time to get done. The fried rice I recall did not have carrots, although in this day and age they are found in a lot of chinese dishes, including fried rice. Years ago you could get chinese food with real chinese vegetables, bok choy, bamboo shoots, bean sprouts, black mushrooms, tree ear, lily buds. Now they chop up some green pepper, onions, and carrots drench it in a sweetish soy sauce and that's chinese food. Maybe I'm a victim of "suburban chinese food syndrome" and I need to go to China town.


    The real problem with carrots is that they simply do not belong in the fried rice of my world.

    If I see fried rice with that light tan colored fluffy rice dotted with the contents of a frozen bag of discount peas and carrots, I know I'm pretty much in for "glop" instead of Chinese food. I'm not sure when this started but I first noticed it in the southwest many, many moons ago. I laughed my butt off when my order of vegetable fried rice came as that stuff, and it went into my mental notes as a reason that the Southwest would never be for me. I thought I'd never see that in the Chicagoland area, but, apparently, here we are. When I'm wanting fried rice from a new place, and "vegetable fried rice is on the menu," I ask what vegetables are in it. Once you say, hold the frozen peas and carrots, and then list off actual vegetables that would belong in a vegetarian meal that the place should be actually proud to serve to someone, I usually get e decent concoction. I usually offer them the note that I would be happy if they would care to throw in any fresh peppers, or some chili garlic sauce, or other interesting bits they might have to the mix. Frozen peas and carrots tho - that's their way of saying "They will just eat whatever we slop out to them."


    N.B. When I talk of carrots in my fried rice, I mean real carrots, not those frozen orange cubes they mix in with peas.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #40 - October 20th, 2011, 7:17 pm
    Post #40 - October 20th, 2011, 7:17 pm Post #40 - October 20th, 2011, 7:17 pm
    you can put anything in fried rice if you are going with the lets use up the leftovers mode,even sliced hotdogs. but my holy grail for fried rice does not have carrots. One thing we did not talk about is what kind of rice do you use, what brand? I made some sona masuri rice to put in the fridge overnight but that is south indian, its the only kind I have now so we shall see. I am making it tomorrow. Is there a certain brand of rice chinese restaurants use?
    Toria

    "I like this place and willingly could waste my time in it" - As You Like It,
    W. Shakespeare
  • Post #41 - October 21st, 2011, 12:42 pm
    Post #41 - October 21st, 2011, 12:42 pm Post #41 - October 21st, 2011, 12:42 pm
    Mhays wrote:I would suggest: make sure you're using both ginger and garlic as seasoning, and toss in some sesame oil along with your soy - I think this is the standard "takeout chinese" seasoning. The texture is where I run into trouble - cold rice is critical, but I've also failed with it, so that's not the only variable (I have had some minor success using brown rice just because the bran protects it a bit from mushiness.)


    I agree with this advice on the seasoning, perhaps adding a bit of oyster sauce if it's handy. But I would add the ginger and sesame oil later in the preparation to avoid dulling their flavor - stir in just before removing from the pan. Also add some chopped scallions when serving. That said, I have also produced tasty fried rice with just soy sauce and sesame oil.

    Brown rice is our default, and using cold leftover cooked brown rice has always yielded good results for me. I use a short-grain variety. (on that subject: is anyone else having difficulty locating short-grain brown rice lately? I can find it only at Whole Foods these days. I used to be able to get it at my local Jewel!)

    this comes down more to technique than a set recipe.

    Here is the most valuable tip I can render: quickly scramble your eggs in a hot pan with a generous amount of oil (or a non-stick pan with a little oil), and then dump your rice right into the eggs while the eggs are only barely half-cooked. they should still be very wet. stir your rice into the eggs and as a result you get a beautiful creamy egg texture throughout the fried rice. This is where I would splash in the soy and garlic and stir till uniformly hot and sizzling.

    if you want to add vegetables: they should be pre-cooked and chopped small and combined with the cold rice before you begin frying the eggs. (predictably, some vegetables don't need to be pre-cooked, like snow peas)

    if you want to add some shrimp or ham or other meat: chop into small pieces and fry before frying the eggs. combine with the rice (and vegetables) then proceed.
  • Post #42 - October 21st, 2011, 1:19 pm
    Post #42 - October 21st, 2011, 1:19 pm Post #42 - October 21st, 2011, 1:19 pm
    sarcon wrote:Brown rice is our default, and using cold leftover cooked brown rice has always yielded good results for me. I use a short-grain variety. (on that subject: is anyone else having difficulty locating short-grain brown rice lately? I can find it only at Whole Foods these days. I used to be able to get it at my local Jewel!)


    I get my brown rice (short grain also) at H-mart. It was on sale for less than $10 for a big bag!
  • Post #43 - October 21st, 2011, 2:13 pm
    Post #43 - October 21st, 2011, 2:13 pm Post #43 - October 21st, 2011, 2:13 pm
    One rather cool thing is that Lodge makes a cast iron wok with a flat base. If you have a glasstop electric stove, you can damn near make that sucker glow red. Weighs about a ton, of course, but that's great thermal inertia.

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #44 - October 21st, 2011, 2:19 pm
    Post #44 - October 21st, 2011, 2:19 pm Post #44 - October 21st, 2011, 2:19 pm
    And if you REALLY want to do it right, here's the cheapest, most authentic solution.

    Blast off!

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #45 - October 21st, 2011, 3:32 pm
    Post #45 - October 21st, 2011, 3:32 pm Post #45 - October 21st, 2011, 3:32 pm
    Cool equipment. Not going to happen a my house though. No room and too heavy. I will have to make do with my faux wok and a high output burner on my stove.
    Toria

    "I like this place and willingly could waste my time in it" - As You Like It,
    W. Shakespeare
  • Post #46 - October 21st, 2011, 6:27 pm
    Post #46 - October 21st, 2011, 6:27 pm Post #46 - October 21st, 2011, 6:27 pm
    I made my first attempt at fried rice. I used raw fine strips of a rib eye steak for the meat. I marinated this in some teriyaki, ginger, garlic, soy and green onions for a few hours. I heated the pan and put oil in and threw in the meat and white parts of green onion.and cooked that on high heat. then I put in the egg and scrambled, dumped in the rice and soy sauce. Green onion parts, bamboo sprouts and sesame oil went in at the end. A pinch of sugar. All in all I think it was good I would give it a 7 out of ten. Not the most delicious fried rice but good for a first attempt. Color and texture is right on. I have come to be a believer in sugar. I need to add a bit more next time. but it still did not have the missing taste I am looking for...I guess that will still be a memory unless I can find it in a restaurant.
    What about bead molasses? I dont here this talked about much.
    Toria

    "I like this place and willingly could waste my time in it" - As You Like It,
    W. Shakespeare
  • Post #47 - October 23rd, 2011, 9:21 pm
    Post #47 - October 23rd, 2011, 9:21 pm Post #47 - October 23rd, 2011, 9:21 pm
    toria wrote:I am looking to make the brown colored delicious fried rice you used to be able to get at chinese takeouts. It was addictive and had rice, scrambled eggs, green onions, small pieces of meat, sometimes pork or beef, and bean sprouts in it, as well as soy sauce.


    I used to crave Pago Pago's fried rice. From memory it had chicken, tiny shrimp, bbq pork, egg, bean sprouts, and lettuce(!). The bottom of the container was especially delicious because of the slightly oily quality which seemed to concentrate the flavors.
    Coming to you from Leiper's Fork, TN where we prefer forking to spooning.
  • Post #48 - October 24th, 2011, 8:27 am
    Post #48 - October 24th, 2011, 8:27 am Post #48 - October 24th, 2011, 8:27 am
    toria wrote:but it still did not have the missing taste I am looking for...


    I wonder if what you are missing is umami?, the "fifth taste"?

    Being were talking about restaurant flavor Chinese food, and human memory, I'm guessing trying monosodium glutamate in your cooking might do the trick.

    Try an experiment. Get all your ingredients for a batch of your fried rice. Split them in two. Make one batch like you normally do, and for the second batch throw a teaspoon full of Accent into your process early on. Plate both preparations and do a side by side taste test.
  • Post #49 - October 24th, 2011, 8:42 am
    Post #49 - October 24th, 2011, 8:42 am Post #49 - October 24th, 2011, 8:42 am
    Possibly but I was not even aware that accent is still being sold. I'm leery of putting msg in a dish. I think I'll give up trying to duplicate my favorite fried rice at home. I'll still make it but only as a vehicle to use up leftovers. I'll glady throw in bacon, peas, carrots the whole ball of wax as long as it taste good. It won't be authentic. I'll order fried rice out and I'll continue my quest, using the best fried rice thread as a guide to where to go.
    Toria

    "I like this place and willingly could waste my time in it" - As You Like It,
    W. Shakespeare
  • Post #50 - October 24th, 2011, 8:56 am
    Post #50 - October 24th, 2011, 8:56 am Post #50 - October 24th, 2011, 8:56 am
    toria wrote: I'm leery of putting msg in a dish.


    It would be all in the name of science of the culinary arts! :)

    FWIW, I know this is a tangent in the fried rice thread, but there's MSG in all kinds of things many of us normally ingest.
  • Post #51 - October 24th, 2011, 9:16 am
    Post #51 - October 24th, 2011, 9:16 am Post #51 - October 24th, 2011, 9:16 am
    Had fried rice at Sun Wah last night. Definitely has sesame oil in it. Not a lot, just a touch. Green peas, meat, egg, tiny bits of scallion or chive.
    Leek

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  • Post #52 - December 6th, 2020, 1:03 am
    Post #52 - December 6th, 2020, 1:03 am Post #52 - December 6th, 2020, 1:03 am
    Fried rice with Chinese sausage and, yes, a few carrots. Turned out well, our neighbor, who hails from Singapore, was over with Charles "Treat Machine" de Gaulle, said she felt transported to her youth.

    click to enlarge
    Image
    Image
    Image
    Image

    Fried Rice, count me a Fan!
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #53 - December 6th, 2020, 9:05 am
    Post #53 - December 6th, 2020, 9:05 am Post #53 - December 6th, 2020, 9:05 am
    Looking good G Wiv as always! Chinese sausage fried rice and using oyster sauce is what my parents did for at home fried rice too. I often have have leftover rice and make this for myself to transport me back to my childhood.

    I low-key do really miss my parents fried rice from the restaurant, which was more American-Chinese style. I still remember the day my dad allowed me to handle the flamethrower burner and cook fried rice. I was like 10 years old and had to stand on a milk crate to be tall enough. I am hoping to get a jet burner wok burner to recreate one day. A few variations I love cooking at home (also to get takeout to support Chinese restaurants):

      Dried scallops and egg whites fried rice
      Fukin Fried Rice
      Ying Yang Fried Rice
      XO fried rice

    I recently watched a Hong Kong segment on Fried Rice which highlighted a few HK/Canto chefs on the topic of fried rice. It was so interesting to observe how each chef had a different take on the best technique for fried rice.. eggs first.. eggs last..egg in the middle.. cold rice.. same day rice.. seasoning...

    Add another layer of dimension with the different types of fried rice with diaspora of chinese in other countries... chifa style fried rice... malaysian chinese.. korean-chinese.. japanese chinese.
  • Post #54 - December 6th, 2020, 10:23 am
    Post #54 - December 6th, 2020, 10:23 am Post #54 - December 6th, 2020, 10:23 am
    On the topic of other varieties, I recently became aware of Chiayi or Jiayi Turkey Rice which is a specialty of the town of Chiayi in Taiwan. Closer really to a Turkey version of Hainanese Chicken Rice than fried rice, but now very high on my list of things to make next.
    "I live on good soup, not on fine words." -Moliere
  • Post #55 - December 6th, 2020, 10:30 am
    Post #55 - December 6th, 2020, 10:30 am Post #55 - December 6th, 2020, 10:30 am
    scoops86 wrote:Looking good G Wiv as always! Chinese sausage fried rice and using oyster sauce is what my parents did for at home fried rice too. I often have have leftover rice and make this for myself to transport me back to my childhood.


    Thanks, I'm with you 100% love fried rice. My pictured fried rice is more, to my way of thinking at least, American style as it a wee bit wet and slightly dark. That screams middle America Cantonese suburban to me as opposed to the dry lighter style with noticeable wok hay. I like them both, and all in-between.

    Ducks in a row pic is missing a few things, mirin, sesame oil, soy sauce, red pepper flakes. Sometimes I go oyster sauce, sometimes Nam Prik Pao, sometimes Pixian Douban, sometimes . . . Far as eggs, I typically make an omelette with a little soy, mirin and drop of sesame oil, hold then add in at finish. Usually make with leftover rice or, in this case, I made rice in the morning for that evening.

    Thanks again for the suggestions, XO fried rice sounds like a winner. Maybe I will try a round with Bullhead BBQ sauce, though the wife is (still) not enamored with the idea of consuming lizard fish. :)

    Fried Rice, count me a Fan!
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #56 - December 6th, 2020, 11:05 am
    Post #56 - December 6th, 2020, 11:05 am Post #56 - December 6th, 2020, 11:05 am
    Hi,

    Long ago there was a knock down drag out fight between CrazyC (Hong Kong and Singapore) and TonyC (Taiwan) over the authenticity of lettuce in fried rice. TonyC was upset about lettuce found in fried rice in a local Chinese restaurant. CrazyC defended it, because she had seen this done before in Asia.

    I use oyster (and sometimes mushroom) sauce in fried rice. It is far better than what I did early on: too much soy sauce.

    Looking up representative recipes for what scoops86 was referring to:

    Dried scallops and egg whites fried rice aka ‘Billionaire Fried Rice’ with a recipe variant with uncooked rice.

    I looked up Fukin fried rice, it is also know as Hokkien, Fukien and Fujian fried rice. I recall a number of people from Taiwan are from Fuzhou, I was hoping for a fish-based fried rice. " fried rice is unique from the rest of the pack because it consists of two parts – a fried rice base and a juicy savory gravy that contains seafood, meat, and vegetables." The fried rice is plain rice and an egg. It is the sauce on top.

    Ying-Yang rice is served at Chinese weddings: it is rice with egg yolks stirred in topped with a shrimp sauce and a sauce with chicken breast.

    XO Fried rice (SCALLOP FRIED RICE WITH XO SAUCE AND CRISPY GARLIC and XO Fried Rice with Char Siu. Relative to what I may do normally, I use XO sauce instead of oyster.

    And now bw77's suggested fried recipe using a turkey breast in a new way: JiaYi turkey rice, which may be related to "Taiwanese Stewed Pork Rice."

    I linked to recipes I found, though I am not 100% certain they are what bw77 or scoops86 had in mind. Please counter with links with recipes that fit your idea, because it is all good information.

    Regards,
    CAthy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
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  • Post #57 - December 6th, 2020, 11:55 am
    Post #57 - December 6th, 2020, 11:55 am Post #57 - December 6th, 2020, 11:55 am
    G Wiv wrote:
    Thanks again for the suggestions, XO fried rice sounds like a winner. Maybe I will try a round with Bullhead BBQ sauce, though the wife is (still) not enamored with the idea of consuming lizard fish. :)

    Fried Rice, count me a Fan!


    Def try with Bullhead. Lizard fish is nothing weird other than the name! It's just a fish :P.

    Cathy2 wrote:Long ago there was a knock down drag out fight between CrazyC (Hong Kong and Singapore) and TonyC (Taiwan) over the authenticity of lettuce in fried rice. TonyC was upset about lettuce found in fried rice in a local Chinese restaurant. CrazyC defended it, because she had seen this done before in Asia.


    I would 100% vouch for shredded lettuce in fried rice. I've seen it added near the end of the cooking process at some of the canto chinatown places with some of their more traditional fried rice dishes.

    I forgot to name another one of my favorite fried rice, salted fish and chicken cubed fried rice, which also has shredded lettuce. If you go to MyPlace, they have it :). I used to have this almost every other day being in HK/China/Macau 1-2 months at a time. Asian Noodle house out in the NW burbs has a Malaysian Chinese version of this on their secret menu.

    I am not sure you can argue against the authenticity of it either way with fried rice being insanely diverse and hyper regionalized. I think the only thing you can reasonably call out as "traditional" or not is the color of fried rice (dark vs non dark - usage of dark soy sauce). I should look up the thread.

    The XO Scallops Fried Rice is sometimes how I make my dried scallop fried rice. Adding my parents homemade XO sauce with the dried scallops (conpoy) I have from HK makes an insane umami bomb with each bite.

    Appreciate ya posting the recipes. They all look pretty spot on!
  • Post #58 - December 6th, 2020, 12:18 pm
    Post #58 - December 6th, 2020, 12:18 pm Post #58 - December 6th, 2020, 12:18 pm
    Scoops86,

    I appreciate your broadening my fried rice vocabulary:

    Cantonese chicken and salted fish fried rice dish

    There is an interesting link in this recipe to Chinese dried and preserved ingredients.

    What is your preferred dried fish?

    I learned a new acronym: ABC - American Born Chinese.

    This is all so great!

    Thanks!

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #59 - December 6th, 2020, 2:29 pm
    Post #59 - December 6th, 2020, 2:29 pm Post #59 - December 6th, 2020, 2:29 pm
    Image

    Image

    Not like a Chinese restaurant, but backyard version for lunch today using leftovers from Golden Chopsticks take out from last night.
    "I live on good soup, not on fine words." -Moliere
  • Post #60 - December 7th, 2020, 8:14 am
    Post #60 - December 7th, 2020, 8:14 am Post #60 - December 7th, 2020, 8:14 am
    What are you cooking on that contains the coals ? Is there a different flavor than if you had cooked on the stove top, or are you just getting higher heat than you could on the stove top ?

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