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How do you flavor your hummus?

How do you flavor your hummus?
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  • How do you flavor your hummus?

    Post #1 - May 31st, 2012, 5:02 pm
    Post #1 - May 31st, 2012, 5:02 pm Post #1 - May 31st, 2012, 5:02 pm
    I'm making hummus to take to a get together tomorrow. I've made hummus using a recipe I found on the Internet (from allrecpe.com IIRC) and it was good but rather plain. I'm wondering what I can do to zing it up a bit. My first thought is more garlic. :D Does anyone here make their own hummus and have suggestions for additional flavors?

    I've also made the variant that includes fire roasted peppers and Feta cheese and like that too. I've got spinach ready in the garden. I wonder if I could use some of that with some Feta cheese.

    thanks,
    hank
  • Post #2 - May 31st, 2012, 6:32 pm
    Post #2 - May 31st, 2012, 6:32 pm Post #2 - May 31st, 2012, 6:32 pm
    Depends what you like, really. I'd toast some cumin and add that.
  • Post #3 - May 31st, 2012, 8:03 pm
    Post #3 - May 31st, 2012, 8:03 pm Post #3 - May 31st, 2012, 8:03 pm
    Did your recipe have tahini in it? Hummus without tahini tastes pretty bland to me but, otherwise, my recipe for hummus is just the usual: chickpeas, tahini, lemon, garlic, salt, olive oil, parsley, paprika and/or cumin. I personally wouldn't put too much garlic in it, as hummus shouldn't (in my opinion) tastes like a garlic spread. Yes, it needs garlic, but it's not supposed to be a garlic bomb.
  • Post #4 - May 31st, 2012, 8:49 pm
    Post #4 - May 31st, 2012, 8:49 pm Post #4 - May 31st, 2012, 8:49 pm
    With hot giardiniera and following Cathy2's reco - with preserved lemon.
  • Post #5 - June 1st, 2012, 6:40 am
    Post #5 - June 1st, 2012, 6:40 am Post #5 - June 1st, 2012, 6:40 am
    Thanks all for the tips.
    sundevilpeg wrote:Depends what you like, really. I'd toast some cumin and add that.
    I'll give that a try. I just need to pick up some whole cumin.

    Binko wrote:Did your recipe have tahini in it? Hummus without tahini tastes pretty bland to me but, otherwise, my recipe for hummus is just the usual: chickpeas, tahini, lemon, garlic, salt, olive oil, parsley, paprika and/or cumin. I personally wouldn't put too much garlic in it, as hummus shouldn't (in my opinion) tastes like a garlic spread. Yes, it needs garlic, but it's not supposed to be a garlic bomb.
    That's pretty much the recipe I had and I did get tahini to make it.

    wendy wrote:With hot giardiniera and following Cathy2's reco - with preserved lemon.
    Do you just mix the giardiniera in so it's chunky or do you blend it in? I don't have preserved lemons so I'm out of luck on that account.


    -hank
  • Post #6 - June 1st, 2012, 7:15 am
    Post #6 - June 1st, 2012, 7:15 am Post #6 - June 1st, 2012, 7:15 am
    HankB wrote:Does anyone here make their own hummus and have suggestions for additional flavors?

    I posted this back in '06, still the method and recipe variations I use today.
    Hummus, A Love Story: Recipe and Pictures
    Last edited by G Wiv on June 12th, 2018, 5:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #7 - June 1st, 2012, 9:36 am
    Post #7 - June 1st, 2012, 9:36 am Post #7 - June 1st, 2012, 9:36 am
    hank wrote:
    wendy wrote:With hot giardiniera and following Cathy2's reco - with preserved lemon.
    Do you just mix the giardiniera in so it's chunky or do you blend it in? I don't have preserved lemons so I'm out of luck on that account.

    -hank


    I blend the preserved lemon but go chunky with the giardiniera - roughly chop it and add it to the finished hummus.

    FWIW: I haven't tried them together - I tend to go either salty/sour or spicy/hot.
  • Post #8 - June 1st, 2012, 9:39 am
    Post #8 - June 1st, 2012, 9:39 am Post #8 - June 1st, 2012, 9:39 am
    I like olive tapenade and oilive oil on top, not really mixed in.
  • Post #9 - June 1st, 2012, 10:32 am
    Post #9 - June 1st, 2012, 10:32 am Post #9 - June 1st, 2012, 10:32 am
    There is only one way to make hummus bi tahina (hummus w/ tahini).

    Skinned, cooked chick peas
    Lots of lemon
    Lots of tahina
    A little garlic
    Olive oil
    Salt

    Emulsify the shit out of it in a blender or food processor, or do it old school in a mortar and pestle (taahin).

    Plate in a manner that leaves a circular moat with a raised middle. Fill with olive oil and lemon juice. Sprinkle with sumac and paprika. Don't put weird shit like basil, roasted red pepper, cumin, etc. in it. Not hummus. Not in my world.

    :D
    "By the fig, the olive..." Surat Al-Teen, Mecca 95:1"
  • Post #10 - June 1st, 2012, 1:26 pm
    Post #10 - June 1st, 2012, 1:26 pm Post #10 - June 1st, 2012, 1:26 pm
    Heh-heh, Habibi you need to take part in that discussion on "authenticity" now taking place downboard in "Culinary Chat"! Obviously you have strong thoughts re: authentic hummus!! :lol:

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #11 - June 1st, 2012, 3:28 pm
    Post #11 - June 1st, 2012, 3:28 pm Post #11 - June 1st, 2012, 3:28 pm
    G Wiv wrote:I posted this back in '06, still the method and recipe variations I use today.
    Hummus, A Love Story: Recipe and Pictures
    In the end I had to choose and I went with this one for tonight. It struck a chord with me with the comment "... anyone with a Cuisinart or blender can whip up a basic recipe in 5-minutes, leading me to wonder who the hell buys premade." Convenience is an, uh ... convenient excuse, but at least in this case the results far make up for that. I also took it a step further and started with dry chick peas. Anyone with a pot and stove ... :P

    I also appreciate the suggestions for alternate 'dipping tools' beyond toasted pita as I lack sufficient imagination to come up with those.

    I just finished the hummus and the toasted cumin really gives it a nice flavor and the jalapenos give it a nice zing.

    Thanks all for the suggestions, I'll be trying all of them eventually.

    best,
    hank
  • Post #12 - June 1st, 2012, 5:19 pm
    Post #12 - June 1st, 2012, 5:19 pm Post #12 - June 1st, 2012, 5:19 pm
    HankB wrote:I also appreciate the suggestions for alternate 'dipping tools' beyond toasted pita as I lack sufficient imagination to come up with those.


    I love using the chard stems cut up like celery sticks, especially the bright lights (rainbow) and yellow varieties. Goes great with hummus (and any other dip you care to use them for). I haven't tried this but I bet that baked zucchini chips dusted with some sumac would be pretty delicious dipping vehicles as well.
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #13 - June 1st, 2012, 6:41 pm
    Post #13 - June 1st, 2012, 6:41 pm Post #13 - June 1st, 2012, 6:41 pm
    Habibi wrote:There is only one way to make hummus bi tahina (hummus w/ tahini).

    Skinned, cooked chick peas
    Lots of lemon
    Lots of tahina
    A little garlic
    Olive oil
    Salt

    Emulsify the shit out of it in a blender or food processor, or do it old school in a mortar and pestle (taahin).

    Plate in a manner that leaves a circular moat with a raised middle. Fill with olive oil and lemon juice. Sprinkle with sumac and paprika. Don't put weird shit like basil, roasted red pepper, cumin, etc. in it. Not hummus. Not in my world.

    :D


    Amen! Having been first introduced to hummus as a teen living in Saudi Arabia, I'm old school, too. I laugh to myself when friends rave about the roast-chili horseradish truffled hummus they had. It may have tasted good, but it wasn't hummus.
  • Post #14 - June 1st, 2012, 10:30 pm
    Post #14 - June 1st, 2012, 10:30 pm Post #14 - June 1st, 2012, 10:30 pm
    Habibi wrote:. Don't put weird shit like basil, roasted red pepper, cumin, etc. in it. Not hummus. Not in my world.


    Though I only sometimes put it in mine, isn't cumin fairly normal in certain styles of Middle Eastern hummus?
  • Post #15 - June 2nd, 2012, 12:58 pm
    Post #15 - June 2nd, 2012, 12:58 pm Post #15 - June 2nd, 2012, 12:58 pm
    Want authentic hummus? Someone will give you great ideas on how to make it. That someone is not me. The overwhelming favorite among my friends will be startling to some; those who require authenticity: avert your eyes now.

    Buffalo-wing hummus. That's right, I said it. I take chickpeas and tahini, and I add a ton of Frank's Red Hot, celery salt, heaping helpings of garlic, and melted butter. If I'm feeling really naughty, I throw some schmaltz and gribenes up in there.
  • Post #16 - June 2nd, 2012, 1:00 pm
    Post #16 - June 2nd, 2012, 1:00 pm Post #16 - June 2nd, 2012, 1:00 pm
    Binko wrote:
    Habibi wrote:. Don't put weird shit like basil, roasted red pepper, cumin, etc. in it. Not hummus. Not in my world.


    Though I only sometimes put it in mine, isn't cumin fairly normal in certain styles of Middle Eastern hummus?


    I've never seen it. Cumin is used in certain ful preparations, however. I neglected to mention that hummus can also include garnishes of whole chickpeas, chopped hot pepper, and a tiny bit of chopped parsley. THAT'S IT.

    :twisted:
    "By the fig, the olive..." Surat Al-Teen, Mecca 95:1"
  • Post #17 - June 2nd, 2012, 1:01 pm
    Post #17 - June 2nd, 2012, 1:01 pm Post #17 - June 2nd, 2012, 1:01 pm
    MincyBits wrote:Want authentic hummus? Someone will give you great ideas on how to make it. That someone is not me. The overwhelming favorite among my friends will be startling to some; those who require authenticity: avert your eyes now.

    Buffalo-wing hummus. That's right, I said it. I take chickpeas and tahini, and I add a ton of Frank's Red Hot, celery salt, heaping helpings of garlic, and melted butter. If I'm feeling really naughty, I throw some schmaltz and gribenes up in there.


    It's not hummus. It's buffalo wing-chickpea dip. Do not refer to it as hummus, because, I repeat, it is not hummus.
    "By the fig, the olive..." Surat Al-Teen, Mecca 95:1"
  • Post #18 - June 2nd, 2012, 1:11 pm
    Post #18 - June 2nd, 2012, 1:11 pm Post #18 - June 2nd, 2012, 1:11 pm
    Habibi wrote:
    MincyBits wrote:Want authentic hummus? Someone will give you great ideas on how to make it. That someone is not me. The overwhelming favorite among my friends will be startling to some; those who require authenticity: avert your eyes now.

    Buffalo-wing hummus. That's right, I said it. I take chickpeas and tahini, and I add a ton of Frank's Red Hot, celery salt, heaping helpings of garlic, and melted butter. If I'm feeling really naughty, I throw some schmaltz and gribenes up in there.


    It's not hummus. It's buffalo wing-chickpea dip. Do not refer to it as hummus, because, I repeat, it is not hummus.


    I totally get that. I feel the same way about cocktails that are called martinis and aren't. But I'm still going to eat my buffalo wing hummus because, like a chocolate martini, it is delicious. But not with a chocolate martini; gross.
  • Post #19 - June 2nd, 2012, 2:16 pm
    Post #19 - June 2nd, 2012, 2:16 pm Post #19 - June 2nd, 2012, 2:16 pm
    I never expected such a spirited discussion, but now I know why the recipe for fire roasted red peppers, Feta cheese, chick peas, lemon juice et al is not called hummus!

    Rest assured I'll try the authentic hummus (except I'm probably not going to peel the chick peas. :P ) along with the other variants listed.

    thanks again,
    hank
  • Post #20 - June 2nd, 2012, 4:49 pm
    Post #20 - June 2nd, 2012, 4:49 pm Post #20 - June 2nd, 2012, 4:49 pm
    Just made a batch. I like mine traditional but I also use Greek yogurt (to aid in making it smoother and creamier) and smoked paprika.
  • Post #21 - June 3rd, 2012, 1:53 am
    Post #21 - June 3rd, 2012, 1:53 am Post #21 - June 3rd, 2012, 1:53 am
    Habibi wrote:I've never seen it. Cumin is used in certain ful preparations, however.


    That's interesting. I'm quite surprised at that. I understand that it's not a standard ingredient in hummus, but I thought a pinch or so of cumin was a common variation. I know I've encountered it in at least Syrian restaurants.
  • Post #22 - June 3rd, 2012, 7:26 am
    Post #22 - June 3rd, 2012, 7:26 am Post #22 - June 3rd, 2012, 7:26 am
    Habibi wrote:Don't put weird shit like basil, roasted red pepper, cumin, etc. in it. Not hummus. Not in my world.
    Exploded the first time I saw a puffy chocolate cherry bagel, now I simply seethe.
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #23 - June 3rd, 2012, 7:38 pm
    Post #23 - June 3rd, 2012, 7:38 pm Post #23 - June 3rd, 2012, 7:38 pm
    Habibi wrote:
    Binko wrote:
    Habibi wrote:. Don't put weird shit like basil, roasted red pepper, cumin, etc. in it. Not hummus. Not in my world.


    Though I only sometimes put it in mine, isn't cumin fairly normal in certain styles of Middle Eastern hummus?


    I've never seen it. Cumin is used in certain ful preparations, however. I neglected to mention that hummus can also include garnishes of whole chickpeas, chopped hot pepper, and a tiny bit of chopped parsley. THAT'S IT.

    :twisted:


    Lina's in the Christian Quarter of Jerusalem's Old City, which allegedly specializes in both hummus and mesabha (which is based pm cooked rather than mashed chickpeas), has sliced onion, pine nuts, and green pepper as on-the-side garnishes. The green pepper strikes me as weird, but whatever. And I would think zaatar is also a legitimate garnish as well.

    Otherwise, I agree with you. Roasted pepper, jalapeno, basil, etc. are more or less abominations. And I don't know about Habibi, but I find that with few exceptions, hummus made with the chickpeas that are authentically Middle Eastern (i.e. from the Levant or Turkey) have a better, earthier taste than what people call chickpeas here.
  • Post #24 - June 3rd, 2012, 9:45 pm
    Post #24 - June 3rd, 2012, 9:45 pm Post #24 - June 3rd, 2012, 9:45 pm
    Habibi wrote:It's not hummus. It's buffalo wing-chickpea dip. Do not refer to it as hummus, because, I repeat, it is not hummus.

    Agreed.

    Same goes for these cheese-and-meat-laden abominations baked in 2-inch-tall pans or cut into big floppy slices...quit calling it pizza, you're making 10th-century Gaetanos roll over in their graves.

    Also, eating fries with ketchup is for philistines and derelicts; the people who invented them eat them with mayonnaise, and that's the only way they should be eaten.

    ;)
  • Post #25 - June 4th, 2012, 11:34 am
    Post #25 - June 4th, 2012, 11:34 am Post #25 - June 4th, 2012, 11:34 am
    In my case, garlic, dehydrated lemon, and blood orange olive oil.
  • Post #26 - June 12th, 2012, 9:42 am
    Post #26 - June 12th, 2012, 9:42 am Post #26 - June 12th, 2012, 9:42 am
    Sunday I made a chickpea spread that was really tasty. The best thing was the cooked chickpeas themselves, though. I normally use canned, and made these myself instead. I used the "quick soak" method, put boiling water over them and let them sit for a few hours, then drained and simmered in clean water with a garlic clove, carrot, celery and some sugar. At the end, I added some salt and turned off the heat (no salt during cooking). Now I need something to do with the rest of the chickpeas that won't drown them in other flavors.

    The spread recipe is viewable here as a Google inside the book, and you can see someone else's pics of making the spread here. It's from Mourad: New Moroccan by Mourad Lahlou. He says we all love hummus, but maybe we're at a saturation point, and here's something to try that's a little different.
    Leek

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  • Post #27 - June 12th, 2012, 11:20 am
    Post #27 - June 12th, 2012, 11:20 am Post #27 - June 12th, 2012, 11:20 am
    Stumbled across this recipe & thought of this thread. "How do you flavor your hummus?" "Oh, with sugar, vanilla and chocolate chips..." ;) (To be fair, she's not calling this hummus.)
  • Post #28 - June 12th, 2012, 11:40 pm
    Post #28 - June 12th, 2012, 11:40 pm Post #28 - June 12th, 2012, 11:40 pm
    Habibi is, of course, correct. That said, I enjoy both hummus, and certain hummus-like chickpea-based dips that fall nearby on the bean spread continuum.
    A whisper of cumin, yes.
    A hint of heat from cayenne. Sometimes.
    A smidgen of smoked paprika. Now and them.
    My greatest heresy is horseradish. Nuts. Off the charts apostasy. But what can I say, the heart wants what it wants. I like the zing.

    I think it must be easier to be orthodox with hummus when the chick peas are from the Levant, the lemons grow in the back yard, and the tahini comes from some Palestinians a mile away, etc. Whole different flavor ball game from what I've heard from those who've been there.
    "Strange how potent cheap music is."
  • Post #29 - July 11th, 2012, 4:11 pm
    Post #29 - July 11th, 2012, 4:11 pm Post #29 - July 11th, 2012, 4:11 pm
    Habibi wrote:There is only one way to make hummus bi tahina (hummus w/ tahini).

    Skinned, cooked chick peas
    Lots of lemon
    Lots of tahina
    A little garlic
    Olive oil
    Salt

    Emulsify the shit out of it in a blender or food processor, or do it old school in a mortar and pestle (taahin).

    Plate in a manner that leaves a circular moat with a raised middle. Fill with olive oil and lemon juice. Sprinkle with sumac and paprika. Don't put weird shit like basil, roasted red pepper, cumin, etc. in it. Not hummus. Not in my world.

    :D
    Thanks, Habibi. I'll interpret this as the canonical recipe for hummus. I've made it this way a couple of times and we like it. I'll presume that proportions are not critical and there is some flexibility within the bounds of producing something of approximately the right taste and consistency.

    I did not skin the chick peas. How important is that? Is there an easy way to do that?

    I'm not giving up on other flavors suggested. I've also tried toasted cumin and find that good as well. I feel it is worth while knowing what the starting point is supposed to taste like before venturing off in other directions.

    thanks,
    hank
  • Post #30 - July 12th, 2012, 8:54 pm
    Post #30 - July 12th, 2012, 8:54 pm Post #30 - July 12th, 2012, 8:54 pm
    Totally agree with Habibi. A cat can have kittens in the oven but they still ain't biscuits.

    G Wiv - Yeah, I used to be disgusted but now I try to be amused....
    Coming to you from Leiper's Fork, TN where we prefer forking to spooning.

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