LTH Home

Fave Fresche etc. (Fresh Favas)

Fave Fresche etc. (Fresh Favas)
  • Forum HomePost Reply BackTop
    Page 2 of 2 
  • Post #31 - June 29th, 2009, 6:57 pm
    Post #31 - June 29th, 2009, 6:57 pm Post #31 - June 29th, 2009, 6:57 pm
    favas, scapes, and olive oil in the mortar/pestle:
    Image

    On Whole Foods "Seeduction" toast topped with a hard Venetian cow's milk cheese, served with bitter greens, steamed carrots and shaved radishes dressed in olive oil and lemon:
    Image
    ...defended from strong temptations to social ambition by a still stronger taste for tripe and onions." Screwtape in The Screwtape Letters by CS Lewis

    Fuckerberg on Food
  • Post #32 - June 18th, 2010, 6:35 pm
    Post #32 - June 18th, 2010, 6:35 pm Post #32 - June 18th, 2010, 6:35 pm
    I've cooked a lot with favas, and have a bit of an obsession with finding them in their freshest, most delicious state. Favas deteriorate rapidly. Just harvested, quickly blanched and eaten right away, favas taste an order of magnitude better than the same beans consumed just one day later.

    Which brings me to my dilemma - one for which I seek the counsel of LTHForum's fava experts. I will come upon some very fresh favas in the morning, and while I'll definitely eat some immediately, others will wait for a party on Sunday. So I've got two choices: (1) peel and blanch right away, then keep for a day or (2) keep refrigerated in the pods for a day, then peel and blanch. Which will cause less deterioration?
    ...defended from strong temptations to social ambition by a still stronger taste for tripe and onions." Screwtape in The Screwtape Letters by CS Lewis

    Fuckerberg on Food
  • Post #33 - June 18th, 2010, 6:54 pm
    Post #33 - June 18th, 2010, 6:54 pm Post #33 - June 18th, 2010, 6:54 pm
    there's only one way to find out!
    i used to milk cows
  • Post #34 - May 17th, 2011, 8:51 pm
    Post #34 - May 17th, 2011, 8:51 pm Post #34 - May 17th, 2011, 8:51 pm
    Shuck

    Image

    Blanch/shock/drain/skin

    Image

    Eat, finally

    Image

    Fresh fava and pecorino from Caputo's on Harlem.
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #35 - June 9th, 2013, 8:53 am
    Post #35 - June 9th, 2013, 8:53 am Post #35 - June 9th, 2013, 8:53 am
    Whole Foods LP had a huge selection of some great looking pods this morning. The beginning of the season is always the best.
    "We eat slowly and with gusto." - Paul Bäumer in AQOTWF
  • Post #36 - April 21st, 2015, 12:26 pm
    Post #36 - April 21st, 2015, 12:26 pm Post #36 - April 21st, 2015, 12:26 pm
    I've had fava beans on my mind lately --- so much so that, not having seen any in nearby stores yet, I had to buy some frozen lima beans and boil and butter them and make them stand in for favas --- and I have not eaten, much less craved, lima beans for well over thirty years. I'm glad I was able to find this thread. It seems that I should be able to find favas by now, late April, in local grocery stores with a produce focus (e.g., Garden Fresh Market), and I plan to go looking in the next day or two. Just wondering, has anyone else seen fava beans recently in north suburban groceries stores such as Caputo's or Fresh Farms?
    "Your swimming suit matches your eyes, you hold your nose before diving, loving you has made me bananas!"
  • Post #37 - June 29th, 2020, 2:27 pm
    Post #37 - June 29th, 2020, 2:27 pm Post #37 - June 29th, 2020, 2:27 pm
    Question: Are fresh fava beans worth the trouble?
    Answer: I hope to find out later today.

    Either way, they are a ton of work. I spent well more than an hour -- probably closer to two -- getting these shelled and peeled. Not saying it wasn't relaxing in a Zen-like kind of way but I also know I wouldn't want to do it on a regular basis . . .

    Image
    Fava Beans
    Still in their pods, this was approximately four pounds. The first pound, I received in my CSA box. The rest, in a moment of temporary insanity, I purchased as an add-on.

    Image
    Unpodded Favas
    To say that I was halfway home with the favas out of their pods would be a gross overstatement. One task down, ~80% of the work still to come. :evil:

    Image
    Ready For Shelling
    My Konosuke HD2 Petty (120mm) was effectively powerless against the favas. :o :( Actually, the knife worked well versus the leathery fava skins but it was an incredibly inefficient approach slitting the sides of the beans one at a time. In the end, this task required a couple of thumbnails and a whole lot of patience.

    Image
    Shelled & Peeled Favas
    I really do think it took about two hours of work to get them to this stage. Four pounds of whole favas yielded 13.8 ounces of usable bean meat. Still not sure what I'm going to do with them.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #38 - June 29th, 2020, 2:51 pm
    Post #38 - June 29th, 2020, 2:51 pm Post #38 - June 29th, 2020, 2:51 pm
    Let me get this straight. You got a pound of something you really couldn't use. So, of course, you go out and buy 3 more pounds of product you really can't use.
  • Post #39 - June 29th, 2020, 3:03 pm
    Post #39 - June 29th, 2020, 3:03 pm Post #39 - June 29th, 2020, 3:03 pm
    lougord99 wrote:Let me get this straight. You got a pound of something you really couldn't use. So, of course, you go out and buy 3 more pounds of product you really can't use.

    But instead of 13.5 ounces to use, he would have had 3.4 ounces. If you are going to do it but once, you may as well have enough to work with.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #40 - June 29th, 2020, 3:28 pm
    Post #40 - June 29th, 2020, 3:28 pm Post #40 - June 29th, 2020, 3:28 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:
    lougord99 wrote:Let me get this straight. You got a pound of something you really couldn't use. So, of course, you go out and buy 3 more pounds of product you really can't use.

    But instead of 13.5 ounces to use, he would have had 3.4 ounces. If you are going to do it but once, you may as well have enough to work with.

    Cathy's correct. It doesn't make sense to serve 3 ounces of anything to my family. So, what I did was get 4 pounds of something I know I like, and that I haven't had in a while . . . and hope for inspiration. Avoiding culinary ruts is certainly one of my goals these days. However, what I'd forgotten was how much work they are. In the past, I'd only used them as a garnish, so I never needed to work through very many.

    In this case, a little advance research indicated that I'd come up with 1/2 cup of usable fava beans for each pound of whole pods. In the end, that seems about right, though volume is for suckers. The bottom line is that the net yield seems to be approximately 21% by weight. I think I might divide what I have into 2 meals and start with something very basic, just so I can really assess how they are. There's certainly no reason for a long cook, as they are quite palatable raw.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #41 - June 29th, 2020, 3:40 pm
    Post #41 - June 29th, 2020, 3:40 pm Post #41 - June 29th, 2020, 3:40 pm
    Of course. I should have posted a smilee at then end of my post.
  • Post #42 - June 29th, 2020, 3:58 pm
    Post #42 - June 29th, 2020, 3:58 pm Post #42 - June 29th, 2020, 3:58 pm
    i've done what you just did, ronnie, and it's good to say you've done it....once. frozen fava beans taste really good, just sayin'....and while i haven't seen them for awhile, in past years the jewel has had fresh, shelled favas sometimes in the produce department. but, honestly, i can't tell the difference. the letdown was the same when i excitedly tried fresh shelled peas for the first and only time. frozen green peas are identical, sometimes even tastier...
  • Post #43 - June 29th, 2020, 7:03 pm
    Post #43 - June 29th, 2020, 7:03 pm Post #43 - June 29th, 2020, 7:03 pm
    Was the usual blanching and popping out technique not an option for what you want to use these for? That would go so much faster.

    To answer your question, I like fresh favas, but no way are they worth this amount of work. (In other words, prepare for disappointment.) Now if we could get sator beans here...
  • Post #44 - June 29th, 2020, 10:59 pm
    Post #44 - June 29th, 2020, 10:59 pm Post #44 - June 29th, 2020, 10:59 pm
    lougord99 wrote:Of course. I should have posted a smilee at then end of my post.

    No worries, Lou. We're just friends chatting about food here. :)

    justjoan wrote:i've done what you just did, ronnie, and it's good to say you've done it....once. frozen fava beans taste really good, just sayin'....and while i haven't seen them for awhile, in past years the jewel has had fresh, shelled favas sometimes in the produce department. but, honestly, i can't tell the difference. the letdown was the same when i excitedly tried fresh shelled peas for the first and only time. frozen green peas are identical, sometimes even tastier...

    Joan, you are right on the mark. I do think I got something out the exercise but the reward was in the doing, not the result.

    cilantro wrote:Was the usual blanching and popping out technique not an option for what you want to use these for? That would go so much faster.

    To answer your question, I like fresh favas, but no way are they worth this amount of work. (In other words, prepare for disappointment.) Now if we could get sator beans here...

    I'd done them that way in the past but I worried that since I wasn't sure how I was going to use them, that method might lead to too much moisture. In other words, I overthought it. And I agree, they were definitely not worth the effort. Sator beans, on the other hand . . .

    I decided to use half of my hard-earned trove in a simple cook . . .

    Image
    Saute
    A 50/50 mix of butter and bacon fat, and some crushed garlic

    Image
    Simmer
    I added probably about 2 tablespoons of homemade mixed meat stock. Just enough to soften the beans slightly and impart some flavor without leaving too much residual moisture behind. I added some salt and pepper, too.

    Image
    Plated Up
    Garnished with chives

    Yep, they pretty much tasted like English peas, maybe not even that good. They were more bitter than I remembered them, too. And even though I think I got the cooking just about perfect, they did nothing notable in the texture department, either. In the end, it really wasn't worth the effort. I'll probably try to use the rest of them in a batch of quinoa or other multi-ingredient assembly.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain

Contact

About

Team

Advertize

Close

Chat

Articles

Guide

Events

more