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All Things Matzo

All Things Matzo
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  • All Things Matzo

    Post #1 - March 26th, 2013, 10:56 am
    Post #1 - March 26th, 2013, 10:56 am Post #1 - March 26th, 2013, 10:56 am
    Here is a question I've always wanted to ask. Is Matzo something that people would eat at times other than passover? In other words, does it have taste qualities that are superior to something else you might use?
  • Post #2 - March 26th, 2013, 12:28 pm
    Post #2 - March 26th, 2013, 12:28 pm Post #2 - March 26th, 2013, 12:28 pm
    Taste? What taste?
    Texture, that's another thing. Matzoh spread with peanut butter is a fun snack (and not Kosher for Passover for Ashkenaz Jews, peanuts are legumes and kitnyot). Great crunchiness.

    Fried matzoh, where the crackers are soaked in egg* and fried (usually with onions), is another texturally unique dish: nothing is like the chewy, almost leathery chunks of cracker and egg. No, really, I like it a lot. It's how matzoh usually gets used up after Passover in my house.


    * Some Jews will not do anything to get matzoh wet, because any residual airborne yeast could theoretically start it rising. This was parodied I think last year in an article advising taking matzoh nasally, to avoid wetting it in your mouth... but I can no longer find the link.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #3 - March 26th, 2013, 12:45 pm
    Post #3 - March 26th, 2013, 12:45 pm Post #3 - March 26th, 2013, 12:45 pm
    Hi,

    Unless Matzoh is flavored with onion or garlic, it tastes like Carr water crackers to me.

    I went to a matzoh making class last year, I think this thread will be a good repository for those pictures. The Rabbi who conducted it set a timer once liquid was added to the flour. After the bell went off, the dough could no longer be made into matzoh because there now might be yeasts present. You were really cooking against a clock.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #4 - March 26th, 2013, 1:03 pm
    Post #4 - March 26th, 2013, 1:03 pm Post #4 - March 26th, 2013, 1:03 pm
    Handmade matzah can be very good with the nuances of a good wood-fired Neapolitan pizza crust. But it can run upwards of $20 a pound. The machine-made matzahs that are in the big boxes and multi-packs in stores made Wonder Bread taste exotic.
  • Post #5 - March 26th, 2013, 1:10 pm
    Post #5 - March 26th, 2013, 1:10 pm Post #5 - March 26th, 2013, 1:10 pm
    I made some excellent maztos this year by hand. One was a mixture of buckwheat, white, wheat flours. The other was garbanzo bean and white flour. Cooked on a very hot pizza stone in a blazin hot oven; I was very happy with how they turned out.
  • Post #6 - March 26th, 2013, 1:17 pm
    Post #6 - March 26th, 2013, 1:17 pm Post #6 - March 26th, 2013, 1:17 pm
    Ha! And here, I thought I was doing something a bit original this year!! Just finished making matzo-- didnt use the timer but was able to get 12 rounds rolled out and fired within the time frame (or close enough!). I baked mine on my pizza stone, sprinkled with a mix of fennel and coriander seeds, black pepper and maldon's-- broke the rounds into pieces and they'll be my crackers for the 2 chopped liver apps (one is a veg version made from eggplant & walnuts) and a goat cheese log covered with pistachios and dried cherries and drizzled with honey and balsamic syrup. Ready for Seder to start already!!
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #7 - March 26th, 2013, 1:27 pm
    Post #7 - March 26th, 2013, 1:27 pm Post #7 - March 26th, 2013, 1:27 pm
    This thread reminded me of this very funny print ad that appeared in Heeb magazine a while back . . .

    Image

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #8 - March 26th, 2013, 1:52 pm
    Post #8 - March 26th, 2013, 1:52 pm Post #8 - March 26th, 2013, 1:52 pm
    There may be a glitch with the board. I posted a message, was told that I should check because a message was posted in front of mine. In any event.

    I always keep some for two reasons:
    1) sweet butter on a thin layer is always nice. Comfort food.
    2) microwave pizza. Thin layer of pizza sauce, covered with previously microwaved cheese, pepperoni, salami, etc so that the oils have been removed.
  • Post #9 - March 26th, 2013, 2:04 pm
    Post #9 - March 26th, 2013, 2:04 pm Post #9 - March 26th, 2013, 2:04 pm
    exvaxman wrote:There may be a glitch with the board. I posted a message, was told that I should check because a message was posted in front of mine.

    That just means that someone posted in between when you started your post and when you previewed or submitted it. So, if you were replying to other posts, you'd know they'd been made, could read them and could modify your post accordingly.

    Thanks,

    =R=
    for the Moderators
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #10 - March 26th, 2013, 2:53 pm
    Post #10 - March 26th, 2013, 2:53 pm Post #10 - March 26th, 2013, 2:53 pm
    Does anyone know where to buy Matzah Farfale, preferably on the northside of Chicago? My gf is looking for some for a passover dish she is making, but we couldn't find any at the local supermarkets. I suspect the jewel on howard and dominicks on mccormick may have them since they usually have all sorts of jewish/kosher fare, but if anyone else has any suggestions fire away.
  • Post #11 - March 26th, 2013, 3:06 pm
    Post #11 - March 26th, 2013, 3:06 pm Post #11 - March 26th, 2013, 3:06 pm
    vital info's daughter made matzo 'crack' last night for our seder. there are lots of recipes online for this easy, but addictive candy. basically, easy to make toffee spread on matzo, covered with chocolate and optional nuts/ salt. this is worth eating year 'round. i also love matzo brie, made even better with the addition of crumbled feta cheese.
  • Post #12 - March 26th, 2013, 5:10 pm
    Post #12 - March 26th, 2013, 5:10 pm Post #12 - March 26th, 2013, 5:10 pm
    I love that candy/cookie and make it all the time with either saltines or graham crackers. I also make it with just the toffee and nuts and not chocolate. I will have to try it with matzo

    Regarding matzo, here is what Jon Stewart had to say recently.

    http://www.theatlanticwire.com/politics ... zah/63530/

    Actually I kind of like it even though I have no tradition of eating it. I used to frequently lunch at a restaurant that always had it in the bread basket and I would butter it and eat it. I never met a carb I did not like.

    I am not sure how to spell matzo, matza, matzoh.
    Toria

    "I like this place and willingly could waste my time in it" - As You Like It,
    W. Shakespeare
  • Post #13 - March 26th, 2013, 8:59 pm
    Post #13 - March 26th, 2013, 8:59 pm Post #13 - March 26th, 2013, 8:59 pm
    So I think this discussion is showing that there are big differences between homemade matzo and the crackers you buy in the grocery store. Each form however seems to have it's fans and special ways that it is enjoyed. I was really interested in the time issue/yeast thing. Boudreaulicious, whoever gets to share Seder at your table is fortunate indeed!
  • Post #14 - March 26th, 2013, 10:49 pm
    Post #14 - March 26th, 2013, 10:49 pm Post #14 - March 26th, 2013, 10:49 pm
    It seems to me that matzo and saltine crackers are somewhat similar. But matzo has a harder texture to it. I like the idea of fried matzo and would like to make that some time but it seems like it would be somewhat like an omelet. I like cheese in my omelets can you put cheese in fried matzo?
    Toria

    "I like this place and willingly could waste my time in it" - As You Like It,
    W. Shakespeare
  • Post #15 - March 26th, 2013, 11:13 pm
    Post #15 - March 26th, 2013, 11:13 pm Post #15 - March 26th, 2013, 11:13 pm
    razbry wrote:So I think this discussion is showing that there are big differences between homemade matzo and the crackers you buy in the grocery store. Each form however seems to have it's fans and special ways that it is enjoyed. I was really interested in the time issue/yeast thing. Boudreaulicious, whoever gets to share Seder at your table is fortunate indeed!


    Razbry--we had well over 15 dishes tonight and the homemade matzo was the ONLY thing that was completely finished. Every last crumb. Can't wait to make some more!!

    And, in the true spirit of Passover, I'd love for you to join us next year if you can make it!!!

    We had a lovely evening :D
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #16 - March 26th, 2013, 11:18 pm
    Post #16 - March 26th, 2013, 11:18 pm Post #16 - March 26th, 2013, 11:18 pm
    That matzo was freaking AMAZING! The matzo toffee was wonderful too, but the matzo you made from scratch was a revelation, I'll never go back.
    For what we choose is what we are. He should not miss this second opportunity to re-create himself with food. Jim Crace "The Devil's Larder"
  • Post #17 - March 27th, 2013, 12:25 am
    Post #17 - March 27th, 2013, 12:25 am Post #17 - March 27th, 2013, 12:25 am
    mbh wrote:That matzo was freaking AMAZING!


    LOL! Did you watch the Jon Stewart piece linked above? :wink:
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #18 - March 27th, 2013, 6:48 am
    Post #18 - March 27th, 2013, 6:48 am Post #18 - March 27th, 2013, 6:48 am
    boudreaulicious wrote:...and they'll be my crackers for the 2 chopped liver apps....

    Oy. What a world this is. I'm reading Jen's post and--as a measure of how my mind has been permanently altered by technology--I see "chopped liver apps" and I think: wait! I missed this? Where can I get an app for chopped liver? :shock:


    (Oh. :( Wrong app.)
    Gypsy Boy

    "I am not a glutton--I am an explorer of food." (Erma Bombeck)
  • Post #19 - March 27th, 2013, 7:01 am
    Post #19 - March 27th, 2013, 7:01 am Post #19 - March 27th, 2013, 7:01 am
    mbh wrote:That matzo was freaking AMAZING! The matzo toffee was wonderful too, but the matzo you made from scratch was a revelation, I'll never go back.

    Agreed . . . just not sure how I'm going to ensure this annual boudreaulicious matzoh production . . . so I'll probably continue to rely upon some commercially made matzoh and maybe try making some of my own. Another problem with Jen's matzoh - no reminder of suffering . . . too enjoyable. :D
  • Post #20 - March 27th, 2013, 7:44 am
    Post #20 - March 27th, 2013, 7:44 am Post #20 - March 27th, 2013, 7:44 am
    You are all too kind :). It was fun to make--the beat the clock aspect of it especially.
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #21 - March 27th, 2013, 8:00 am
    Post #21 - March 27th, 2013, 8:00 am Post #21 - March 27th, 2013, 8:00 am
    Wow boudreaulicious, thank you for the invitation. I would love to come next year! :D
  • Post #22 - March 27th, 2013, 9:31 am
    Post #22 - March 27th, 2013, 9:31 am Post #22 - March 27th, 2013, 9:31 am
    toria wrote:It seems to me that matzo and saltine crackers are somewhat similar. But matzo has a harder texture to it. I like the idea of fried matzo and would like to make that some time but it seems like it would be somewhat like an omelet. I like cheese in my omelets can you put cheese in fried matzo?

    You may, but it would be unusual to see. Remember that not only don't you eat dairy with meat, you don't prepare it in the same cooking vessels. And it goes one step further in that Passover cooking and service pieces (silverware, plates, etc.) must never have touched leavened bread (etc.). Because of the cost -- and remember that you only use these for eight days a year -- very few observant families have dairy pans, plates, forks, for passover, and will only eat meat or meat/dairy neutral items during Passover.

    Mind you, our clan doesn't care: we don't have Passover-specific plates/pans, and we'll serve butter for the matzoh alongside brisket, and cheesecake for dessert.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #23 - March 27th, 2013, 9:44 am
    Post #23 - March 27th, 2013, 9:44 am Post #23 - March 27th, 2013, 9:44 am
    To me, matzo brei (what you are calling fried matzo) is more like the Passover version of French toast. We always ate it covered in maple syrup. I've never had a savory version but can't picture matzo as an omelette filling (or saltines for that matter).
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #24 - March 27th, 2013, 9:59 am
    Post #24 - March 27th, 2013, 9:59 am Post #24 - March 27th, 2013, 9:59 am
    We didn't have it covered in maple syrup (which sounds wonderful) but we always had it sweet (sprinkled with sugar), never savory. Looking back, savory is such a logical way to use it, I wonder why it never occurred. I have to think that how any given family is used to eating it is likely to depend upon where the family is from in the old country/ies. Just like regional food anywhere, I imagine that people in certain areas had matzo brei sweet and others had it savory. Does anyone know?
    Gypsy Boy

    "I am not a glutton--I am an explorer of food." (Erma Bombeck)
  • Post #25 - March 27th, 2013, 10:13 am
    Post #25 - March 27th, 2013, 10:13 am Post #25 - March 27th, 2013, 10:13 am
    I'm a matzo brei savory guy all the way. Usually with salami & onions (and eggs).
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #26 - March 27th, 2013, 10:14 am
    Post #26 - March 27th, 2013, 10:14 am Post #26 - March 27th, 2013, 10:14 am
    My family always made fried matzoh with onions, and cooked rather drier than french toast -- whose custardy center is the usual attraction.
    That doesn't mean it was always savory. Several members of my family would eat it with jam. I'm pretty sure that was still with onions. Then again, my father and brother eat latkes with sour cream and applesauce (but that's another show).

    The Spanish tortilla might be a closer equivalent: I've seen recipes (including one in "The Family Meal" from El Bulli) which use potato chips mixed with eggs, and that might give a more similar texture, although probably still eggier.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #27 - March 27th, 2013, 10:42 am
    Post #27 - March 27th, 2013, 10:42 am Post #27 - March 27th, 2013, 10:42 am
    Gypsy Boy wrote:We didn't have it covered in maple syrup (which sounds wonderful)


    Not being much of a french toast fan either, it wasn't my favorite. I grew up in FLA but mom is a transplant from Anderson, IN of all places, so no idea how that variation became the standard in the house. I'll have to ask her!

    Now Steve's version with salami and onions (lox would be good too!) sounds a LOT better! More like a Jewish version of Chilaquiles.
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #28 - March 27th, 2013, 10:49 am
    Post #28 - March 27th, 2013, 10:49 am Post #28 - March 27th, 2013, 10:49 am
    boudreaulicious wrote:...More like a Jewish version of Chilaquiles.

    Now that's an idea: matzoh brei with onions, chiles and tomatoes. Probably have to stick to turkey or beef chorizo :(
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #29 - March 27th, 2013, 11:03 am
    Post #29 - March 27th, 2013, 11:03 am Post #29 - March 27th, 2013, 11:03 am
    Montréal is justly famous for its bagels. [My wife, The Other Dr. Gale, is a New Yorker. She refuses to eat the bagels here, says they aren't *real* bagels. Millions of Canadiens beg to differ with her.] The most famous bagelry is the Fairmont shop, open 24/7. There are *always* cars double-parked in front of the place, all hours night and day. They make a delight they simply call "matzo", but which I think is more properly called matzo board —it's very hard-surfaced, crunchy, addictive. While she won't eat their bagels, TODG has been known to eat so many of the poppy seed matzo boards that she gets a high (or at least claims she does!) from the poppy seeds.

    Those things are freaky good. Anyone know anything about them? Is this just a Montréal thing??


    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #30 - March 27th, 2013, 11:23 am
    Post #30 - March 27th, 2013, 11:23 am Post #30 - March 27th, 2013, 11:23 am
    We didn't call it matzo brei, just matzo and eggs. Dry matzo crumbled into beaten egg, no other liquid. Salt and pepper, fried in chicken fat (schmaltz) so it was often a little garlicky. Always savory.
    Leek

    SAVING ONE DOG may not change the world,
    but it CHANGES THE WORLD for that one dog.
    American Brittany Rescue always needs foster homes. Please think about helping that one dog. http://www.americanbrittanyrescue.org

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