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where to pick morels

where to pick morels
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  • where to pick morels

    Post #1 - May 24th, 2005, 2:36 pm
    Post #1 - May 24th, 2005, 2:36 pm Post #1 - May 24th, 2005, 2:36 pm
    I used to go morel hunting with my grandfather in southern IL. when I was a wee lad, but I believe we were ususally on the private land of his neighbors from whom he got permision. Where can I get info on where I can pick morels without the fear of picking buchshot out of my pants.
  • Post #2 - May 24th, 2005, 2:55 pm
    Post #2 - May 24th, 2005, 2:55 pm Post #2 - May 24th, 2005, 2:55 pm
    Hi,

    I have a deceased friend who always kept a picture of a forest in his wallet to answer questions like yours. Next best thing is consult this information.

    The first morel found in Illinois was March 22nd this year. Way down state the season effectively concluded a month ago. The only chance of finding something now is to head north of Illinois.

    Mushrooms can be collected in Illinois State Forests, though this does not apply to nature preserves or some county forests. You have to be aware this also coincides with turkey hunting, I believe, so some areas you are not permitted into the woods until after 1 PM.

    You don't always have to travel far afield to find morels. I have heard some have been found as close as Lincoln Park.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #3 - May 24th, 2005, 3:13 pm
    Post #3 - May 24th, 2005, 3:13 pm Post #3 - May 24th, 2005, 3:13 pm
    C2,

    I like the story about your friend and the picture.

    On a related note, I have a small bag of dried morels that I bought in Seattle about two years ago. I haven't eaten them yet because 1) I was disappointed with the last dried morels I bought (seemed to lack flavor) and 2) I like the way they look, and I frequently pick up the plastic pouch to admire them.

    Question: will they last pretty much forever in the bag or should I eat them sometime soon?

    Hammond
    “Nobody exists on purpose. Nobody belongs anywhere. Everybody’s gonna die. Come watch TV?”
  • Post #4 - May 24th, 2005, 3:20 pm
    Post #4 - May 24th, 2005, 3:20 pm Post #4 - May 24th, 2005, 3:20 pm
    Hi,

    Initially, I freeze my dried mushrooms for a week just to knock out any varmints which might be there. I then keep my mushrooms in a container with an extra bit of plastic to act as an additional seal. As long as they stay dry, they will last forever.

    I have boletes from Russia, which are quite old and still do the trick whenever I require them.

    I'm glad you liked the story. When I wrote his obituary earlier this year I made sure to include it.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #5 - March 24th, 2012, 7:24 am
    Post #5 - March 24th, 2012, 7:24 am Post #5 - March 24th, 2012, 7:24 am
    HI,

    Since spring is early, so will be the morel season by checking this map: http://morelhunters.com/

    If you check the Illinois map, morels are already mid-state. Typically at this time of year, we are getting reports from Carbondale at the southern tip of Illinois.

    A friend inquired about Elderflowers recently. Knowing their schedule, they will likely miss it in June. However, this may be the year we see blooming Elderflowers in late April or early May.

    My front yard looks like early May with the red bud, Magnolia and Lenten Rose blooming. The forsythia is already on its way to leafing out. Can my spireas be too far behind? We'll be taking about this last winter and spring for years.

    I do worry about fruit trees, because a cold snap at the wrong moment could make this years crop go bust.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #6 - June 15th, 2019, 4:08 pm
    Post #6 - June 15th, 2019, 4:08 pm Post #6 - June 15th, 2019, 4:08 pm
    Podcast on

    Morel Mania: All About Morels

    Presented by Tom Nauman

    Tom Nauman's first mushroom hunt was while he was still "in the womb" and he has continued his passion for finding the elusive morel for more than 68 years. He has taken 697 people morel hunting in one event. So much for morel hunters not sharing their honey-holes!

    Mr. Nauman is the founder of The Illinois State Morel Mushroom Hunting Championship, which is now evolving into Morel University. He also founded Morel Mania Inc, a provider of mushroom books, collecting bags, walking staffs, and other merchandise to mushroom enthusiasts throughout the world.

    Morel growth:




    spore release:




    Recorded at Niles History Center on June 3, 2019.

    http://www.illinoismyco.org/

    http://www.morelmania.com/

    ***

    From 2008 until mid-2013, Culinary Historians programs were recorded by WBEZ via Chicago Amplified. Since then, we have recorded our programs hosted on soundcloud.

    You can find a list here.

    We are also on:
    Google Play
    Apple Podcast
    rss feed
    RadioPublic
    SoundCloud
    Spotify
    Stitcher

    These run the length of an introduction plus presentation with questions, but no food samples. :D
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast

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