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  • Post #31 - April 10th, 2015, 5:43 pm
    Post #31 - April 10th, 2015, 5:43 pm Post #31 - April 10th, 2015, 5:43 pm
    Try an "Oopsie Roll" for a faux burger bun.
    http://yourlighterside.com/2009/05/glut ... sie-rolls/

    You may enjoy these cheddar jalapeño crackers.
    http://alldayidreamaboutfood.com/2013/0 ... -free.html
  • Post #32 - April 10th, 2015, 7:38 pm
    Post #32 - April 10th, 2015, 7:38 pm Post #32 - April 10th, 2015, 7:38 pm
    Geo wrote:As someone who spent two years living and eating in and around L'ouville, VI's procedure horrifies me. I mean. Really. Horrifies. Me.

    I'm sure that the Hotel Brown doesn't involve *their* sammich so thoroughly with the nuke machine. Yikes!

    And *then*, knife and fork on the sammich...

    I hope that your citing him doesn't signal approval, Stevez!

    Geo


    It signifies that the unusual phrase "knife and fork, euro style" as it relates to a sandwich has stuck in my mind for nearly 11 years. :wink:
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #33 - April 10th, 2015, 9:34 pm
    Post #33 - April 10th, 2015, 9:34 pm Post #33 - April 10th, 2015, 9:34 pm
    Like ^^^^^ :)

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #34 - April 28th, 2016, 7:19 am
    Post #34 - April 28th, 2016, 7:19 am Post #34 - April 28th, 2016, 7:19 am
    Revving this machine back up again - vacation and spring holidays have cancelled out much of last year's progress.

    So here's a couple recent notes:

    Salads for dinner get dull -- not just for eating but also for cooking (yes, I know Salad is Stupid), so I've tried to get clever with things like Bratwurst Salad with Mustard Vinaigrette and Bul Go Gi Salad with kimchi.

    I've found where Shirataki works right: In replacement of rice noodles in Pad Thai. The texture feels much closer to rice stick, although they still won't absorb sauce. Upping the (mild) veg quotient to include shredded yellow squash and carrot helped with that, and with the fact that the Shirataki package is probably half the amount of noodles we'd have had with rice stick.

    Butternut squash has been a hit. It's found its way into stews, I stuffed a small one a couple weeks ago with ground beef spiced somewhere in the Persian-Afghan spectrum. It's probably higher in carbs/calories than I'd like, though.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #35 - April 28th, 2016, 8:31 am
    Post #35 - April 28th, 2016, 8:31 am Post #35 - April 28th, 2016, 8:31 am
    JoelF--

    Give this a look. It's from Leela, and the squash is brilliant.

    http://shesimmers.com/2013/04/stir-fried-pumpkin-with-eggs-%E0%B8%9C%E0%B8%B1%E0%B8%94%E0%B8%9F%E0%B8%B1%E0%B8%81%E0%B8%97%E0%B8%AD%E0%B8%87%E0%B9%83%E0%B8%AA%E0%B9%88%E0%B9%84%E0%B8%82%E0%B9%88.html

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #36 - April 28th, 2016, 1:49 pm
    Post #36 - April 28th, 2016, 1:49 pm Post #36 - April 28th, 2016, 1:49 pm
    Good stuff in this thread.
  • Post #37 - July 9th, 2019, 9:48 pm
    Post #37 - July 9th, 2019, 9:48 pm Post #37 - July 9th, 2019, 9:48 pm
    Jon Favreau and Roy Choi were messing around with cauliflower fried rice on The Chef Show (Netflix, S1-E6) and since I had a couple of heads of romanesco on hand, I thought I'd give it a try. As much as I love cauliflower, I was still skeptical. But I have to say that the results were excellent.

    You can pretty much follow their method if you watch the episode but it starts with ricing the romanesco (or cauliflower) through the large holes of a box grater (or buying pre-'riced' cauliflower, I suppose). From there, I used a pretty standard 'clean out the fridge' build. I heated a little peanut oil in a 12" saute pan and then threw in some diced leftover sausage and roast beef, a chopped onion and a few cloves of minced garlic. After the meats had rendered and browned the onions and garlic, I added the romanesco (along with some leftover sauteed, sliced mushrooms and a little leftover chicken stock) and let it all cook, tossing it around in the pan fairly often, until the stock evaporated and romanesco was just about tender.

    Before I started, I'd pre-cooked a couple of beaten eggs into a thin, flat sheet and had them ready, chopped into ~1-inch pieces. As as the cooking approached its end, I added them to the pan. This differs from how Choi and Favreau did it. They added the raw eggs right to the pan and mixed them in but this is the way I learned to do it. In any case, at that point, I killed the heat and seasoned the mixture with freshly ground white pepper, soy sauce and wee dashes of toasted sesame oil and fish sauce. Mixed it all up and served it piping hot. The results were excellent. It came together way better than the sum of its parts. I was actually surprised how good it was. Definitely worth a try if you're into this sort of thing.

    =R=
    Gardening is a bloodsport --Meghan Kleeman

    Why don't you take these profiteroles and put them up your shi'-ta-holes? --Jemaine & Bret

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain

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