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befuddled by new ranges - fancy schmancy or plain jane?

befuddled by new ranges - fancy schmancy or plain jane?
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  • Post #31 - December 25th, 2020, 11:45 am
    Post #31 - December 25th, 2020, 11:45 am Post #31 - December 25th, 2020, 11:45 am
    A contractor will probably know the rules of thumb for exhaust venting (an HVAC contractor definitely will), but they also factor in design or aesthetic practices and might trade off exhaust capacity for, say, moving a vent exit to an eave instead of roof or exterior wall (adding at least one elbow to the flow) or exiting the opposite side of the house to make the vent less conspicuous (adding distance). Also, the contractor might assume you're a typical cook and not factor in that serious cooks generate a lot of smoke. So, explain clearly to your contractor how you want your kitchen exhaust to perform and that you'd like to be able to use all the burners at once. You'd like to have 100 CFM exhaust for every 10,000 BTUs of stovetop burner output, so if I'm reading the Blue Star manual right, it has 6 burners at 15K BTU...by higher math, you want a 900 CFM exhaust hood with ducting that has at least that capacity.
  • Post #32 - December 25th, 2020, 9:08 pm
    Post #32 - December 25th, 2020, 9:08 pm Post #32 - December 25th, 2020, 9:08 pm
    I had a new home built 20 years ago. While not a serious cook, I certainly wanted a showplace kitchen. Sub-Zero refrigerator, granite counters, etc. Shopping at a few appliance stores, I decided that I liked the Viking 36" gas range with four burners and a barbecue grille in the center. I doubted that I would ever need to use 6 burners at the same time but really liked the idea of being able to grille steaks, chops, fish and such over an open flame all year round. I had been watching This Old House regularly and in one episode they pointed out that a remote blower is a really nice feature for the exhaust hood because it is so quiet.

    I left it to my contractor who was building high-end homes along with smaller homes like mine in a golf course development. They worked with Grand Appliance in Libertyville.

    While there was ample room for a larger hood in new construction, they gave me a Viking 36" hood over the 36" range. It vents through a large duct that goes almost straight up thru the attic and roof of my single story home to the fan and motor in a metal box on the roof.

    I'm so glad that I did that. The blower is exceptionally quiet in my kitchen. A friend who up-dated a kitchen in an older home in Beverly was amazed at how quiet my exhaust hood was when I demonstrated by showing it held a page of 24 lb printer paper tight to the filter louvers at less than 1/2 speed. He remarked that his hood, which I think was a Wolf like his range, would hold that paper tight but sound like an airplane in the kitchen.

    The 36" hood works fine over my 36" range. I do have to crack a window in my kitchen when using the exhaust hood, otherwise it pulls air from other parts of the home past the thermostat kicking the furnace on making it uncomfortably hot. I believe it is rated at 900 CFM but I seldom have to turn the variable speed fan control to half speed.

    I did have one problem with the range. After the warranty period, one of the two gas burners under the oven stopped working. The oven was still usable but took twice as long to warm up. I spoke with a salesperson at Grand Appliance who told me he could get me the part and if I was reasonably handy, I should be able to replace it myself. I did and I'm really not very handy. Other than that, no problems with the range or hood. BTW my 20 year old Viking has a gas convection oven.
  • Post #33 - December 26th, 2020, 10:48 am
    Post #33 - December 26th, 2020, 10:48 am Post #33 - December 26th, 2020, 10:48 am
    I have a 1982 GE Standard Range. There is nothing fancy about it. Every three or four years, when one of the appliances need repair, I have the repairman do any needed preventative maintenance on my appliances. When you use a local appliance repairman (as opposed to a place like Sears), they are willing to charge you by the hour as opposed to the appliance. This guy does great work.

    Why so I keep such old appliances? Very simple. They were built to last. I once worked for an appliance components manufacturing. The goal of the OEMs for the past 30 years has been to cheapen the quality of the product so that the consumer is conditioned to replace their appliances every 8-10 years. That is great for the Whirlpools of the world, not so great for the consumer. Also, they know that MOST people will replace a range when a knob falls off rather than spending the money for a replacement.

    If you do buy new, I would strongly advise that you talk to appliance repairmen prior to making a purchase. One day my appliance guy was late and visibly upset. he was working on a brand new Kenmore washer (manufactured by LG in Korea). He contacted Sears because he needed the schematics for the washer to repair it. He waited for two weeks and he finally got what he needed from LG. It was in Korean. Most of the repairmen will tell you which midels are problematic and you should avoid.

    Like usual, this is a little "off topic." However, when I am going to make a major purchase like an appliance, I want something that is RELIABLE and DURABLE.
  • Post #34 - December 26th, 2020, 1:32 pm
    Post #34 - December 26th, 2020, 1:32 pm Post #34 - December 26th, 2020, 1:32 pm
    jlawrence01 wrote:If you do buy new, I would strongly advise that you talk to appliance repairmen prior to making a purchase... Most of the repairmen will tell you which midels are problematic and you should avoid.

    Like usual, this is a little "off topic." However, when I am going to make a major purchase like an appliance, I want something that is RELIABLE and DURABLE.


    ^^THIS.
    YUP.

    VERY sound advice. I now take this into consideration on just about everything that's supposed to be durable. Lawn mowers, jet skis, last year's new boat engine, all appliances. If repairs are going to be a massive pain, then it might be better in the long run to go with one brand over another. It's not really the same as one brand having a bad track record of reliability. Stuff can break, but if it DOES, then you don't want to have to wait several weeks for the replacement part, and then have the repair person needing to follow some half-assed ikea style instructions in some google translated verbiage.
    We cannot be friends if you do not know the difference between Mayo and Miracle Whip.
  • Post #35 - December 30th, 2020, 3:40 pm
    Post #35 - December 30th, 2020, 3:40 pm Post #35 - December 30th, 2020, 3:40 pm
    Just an "I second that" : Your basement GE, yes! I've had excellent experience with GE ranges over the years. The Profile is a very nice line.

    And Thermidor is tough as rocks. Full stop.

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #36 - December 30th, 2020, 8:49 pm
    Post #36 - December 30th, 2020, 8:49 pm Post #36 - December 30th, 2020, 8:49 pm
    Thanks all for your posts and PMs. Going with the 36” BlueStar RCS. Reviews and serviceability were excellent. No electronics and the only “mechanisms” on the thing are a switch for the oven light and one for convection. The most common repair (replacing the igniter) is actually reliably doable without a tech. Went with a Zephyr 36” hood. Very excited (ask me how I feel about it in March when my house is a mess :))
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #37 - December 30th, 2020, 10:18 pm
    Post #37 - December 30th, 2020, 10:18 pm Post #37 - December 30th, 2020, 10:18 pm
    boudreaulicious wrote:Very excited (ask me how I feel about it in March when my house is a mess :))


    Along the lines of the house being a mess, some rando thoughts on "during:"

    1. You'll gain some lbs from eating takeout.

    2. Figure out how you'll prepare any meals, like crock pots, electric griddles, microwave, etc. A "makeshift kitchen" area, if you will. I'd suggest something like a folding table, with a microwave, an electric burner, maybe an electric griddle, Paper plates and plasticware. Don't be trying to to do any duck confit, or beef wellington. You're looking at KISS method for a while. If you have good friends and family near, ask them to have you over for more meals than usual, and let them know you'll repay the favor when your fancy kitchen is done.

    3. Where will you do dishes? We used the wash basin in the basement, and it got old...FAST. See #1.

    4. Find a spot to keep the old fridge. Living room or something.

    5. Start compiling a list of places in your hood, and what their nightly specials deals are for takeout. Lists of grocery stores with specific prepared foods that you like might be a good idea, too. That pizza place on the corner that has the Tuesday night BBQ chicken dinner for 6.99, and you toss their menu in the recycling bin? You might find a new appreciation for those types of spots. That said, maybe a walk down the restaurant dense area of your hood to grab takeout menus or take pictures is a good idea.

    We has good intentions of making food at home, but with all of the obstacles, it just got old FAST. Our contractor told us when we were planning that we'd gain a few pounds. I did hone a new skill: I can make you a full breakfast in a panini grill tho. Eggs over easy, hash browns, sausage and toast. It'll be good as hell, too.
    We cannot be friends if you do not know the difference between Mayo and Miracle Whip.
  • Post #38 - December 30th, 2020, 11:53 pm
    Post #38 - December 30th, 2020, 11:53 pm Post #38 - December 30th, 2020, 11:53 pm
    seebee wrote:
    boudreaulicious wrote:Very excited (ask me how I feel about it in March when my house is a mess :))


    Along the lines of the house being a mess, some rando thoughts on "during:"

    1. You'll gain some lbs from eating takeout.

    2. Figure out how you'll prepare any meals, like crock pots, electric griddles, microwave, etc. A "makeshift kitchen" area, if you will. I'd suggest something like a folding table, with a microwave, an electric burner, maybe an electric griddle, Paper plates and plasticware. Don't be trying to to do any duck confit, or beef wellington. You're looking at KISS method for a while. If you have good friends and family near, ask them to have you over for more meals than usual, and let them know you'll repay the favor when your fancy kitchen is done.

    3. Where will you do dishes? We used the wash basin in the basement, and it got old...FAST. See #1.

    4. Find a spot to keep the old fridge. Living room or something.

    5. Start compiling a list of places in your hood, and what their nightly specials deals are for takeout. Lists of grocery stores with specific prepared foods that you like might be a good idea, too. That pizza place on the corner that has the Tuesday night BBQ chicken dinner for 6.99, and you toss their menu in the recycling bin? You might find a new appreciation for those types of spots. That said, maybe a walk down the restaurant dense area of your hood to grab takeout menus or take pictures is a good idea.

    We has good intentions of making food at home, but with all of the obstacles, it just got old FAST. Our contractor told us when we were planning that we'd gain a few pounds. I did hone a new skill: I can make you a full breakfast in a panini grill tho. Eggs over easy, hash browns, sausage and toast. It'll be good as hell, too.


    Thanks for the ideas—that’s a great list!! Fortunately, the very first thing the crew will be doing before they start the new kitchen is running a gas line from our utility room to the basement kitchen and moving our old range into it. We already have a full fridge, sink and microwave down there and eat down there quite a bit. I also have an Instant Pot with the air fryer top that we regularly use for full meals, along with a propane burner and an electric skillet we got my son for school (that he never used of course) so that should keep us afloat if needed.

    The basement fridge/freezer is already the home of our Chicago takeout stash —since moving to Valpo 2 years ago, we make regular trips in to stock up on our favorite spots. We have a few places in town that we take out from once in a while but practically no one delivers to us and I work from home so schlepping 20-30 minutes back and forth to pick up food is pretty infrequent.

    I have been giving some thought to where they’ll move the fridge (it’s new and staying in the remodeled kitchen) since I’m hoping I won’t have to empty the freezer—but I have vowed to use as much of what’s in there as possible in the next couple of months before the work starts. And there’s not much storage down there, so we’ll for sure be living amongst boxes for the duration.

    I’m sure it’s going to be a pain in the ass but it will be worth it!!
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #39 - December 31st, 2020, 1:04 am
    Post #39 - December 31st, 2020, 1:04 am Post #39 - December 31st, 2020, 1:04 am
    Hi,

    I never had to overhaul a kitchen from scratch.

    Years ago, I knew a woman whose kitchen was done from beginning to end in about one week. I told her I never heard of anyone having such a fast overhaul. She explained no work began until all the components were present and at her home. This was her contractor's method to assure the job was completed in the allotted time.

    This might be a strategy to consider, especially since shortages are present in all sorts of industries. I read recently of incompletely assembled appliances waiting on parts before they could be shipped.

    I have known enough people doing dishes in their bathtub while their kitchen was being remodeled. I would do anything to keep the process moving efficiently.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #40 - December 31st, 2020, 1:17 am
    Post #40 - December 31st, 2020, 1:17 am Post #40 - December 31st, 2020, 1:17 am
    Cathy2 wrote:Hi,

    I never had to overhaul a kitchen from scratch.

    Years ago, I knew a woman whose kitchen was done from beginning to end in about one week. I told her I never heard of anyone having such a fast overhaul. She explained no work began until all the components were present and at her home. This was her contractor's method to assure the job was completed in the allotted time.

    This might be a strategy to consider, especially since shortages are present in all sorts of industries. I read recently of incompletely assembled appliances waiting on parts before they could be shipped.

    I have known enough people doing dishes in their bathtub while their kitchen was being remodeled. I would do anything to keep the process moving efficiently.

    Regards,
    Cathy2


    That’s exactly our plan. We’re ordering everything now. All have agreed to store for up to a month if needed. Contractor has all info so knows what supplies are needed. And our slot is set for end of February, so we should be able to deal with some delays, if necessary. And they said it should be done in under a month (this is someone who’s done a lot of work on my house and who’s been 100% reliable throughout). The venting of the hood outside is going to be the most difficult part, I think.
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington

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